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The Bozeman courier. (Bozeman, Mont.) 1919-1954, January 19, 1921, Image 2

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075113/1921-01-19/ed-1/seq-2/

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IONIAN A NEWS
LIVINGSTON MAN CUTS
MILK FROM 15 CENTS
-
Livingston—The price of milk has
been reduced by William Schustrom,
proprietor of the Dairy store, from
15 cents a quart to 12 1-2 cents, or
two quarts for 25 cents. He also re
duced the price of coffee cream from
60 cents to 50 cents. Reduced feed
prices and lower labor costs are given
as the reason for the drop.
MAY BE HAD FREE
_
GOVERNMENT TREES
Glasgow*—Free trees for shelter
belts on farms may be obtained from
the government through the Valley
county farm bureau. Shelter belt al
lotments are apportioned to the vari
ous counties, and only five of the Val
ley county allotments are left. Pro
visions under which the trees may be
obtained are set forth as follows:
If no one in the township you live
in has a free government co-operative
shelter belt plant guild, write the
farm bureau office for application
and directions.
"If the board of directors of the
farm bureau approves th3 rp ..V i-'.'on
it is forwarded to the government sta
«*
tion, Mandan, North Lak.la. /lie
government station will tVn r >nd a
man to inspect the place where you
expcct to plant the trees and advise
you how to prepare the land and how
and where and when to plant the
trees that they furnish you free of
charge. Your planting is inspected
each year for three years by govern
ment inspectors who advise you about:
the trees and replace trees that do
not live."
THE RAILROAD CUTS
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Fairfield—Tumble weed blockades
«re latest. A year ago at this time
trains had difficulty on account of
TUMBLE WEEDS FILL
SPECIAL
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We will sell 3,000 sound dry cedar posts at the very low
price of
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$ 13.75
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per hundred. This will be much the best price at which *
these goods will be offered for a long time to come.. \
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Anticipate your post requirements and come while the 5
coming is good. We have too many posts and need the 8
money. Get the price right: 5
100 POSTS FOR $13.75 i
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Time limit January 15th
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IT WILL PAY YOU to let us figure your bills for
Building Material.
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COAL
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Roundup and Bear Creek Lump and Egg—
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We have it.
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VALLEY LUMBER CMOPANY
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Phone 667.
One block north of City Hall,

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Back to Pre-War
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Battery Prices
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PREST-O-LITE BATTERIES FOR ALL CARS
Last to Raise, First to Reduce

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That new storage battery your car needs—can now
be bought at a big and substantial saving. You will think
the good old days have really come back when you see what
the Prest-O-Lite has done to restore the low cost of motor
ing.
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HEAVY REDUCTION IN COST OF YOUR NEW
BATTERY
Yet quality has been rigidly maintained. That unusual
pep and reserve power for which the Prest-O-Lite battery
has always been famous, is greater than ever today.
8
A full powered battery of correct size for your car is
ready, waiting for you at the new price. A Presb-O-Lite
battery in your car will give you a world of satisfaction
fl
a
Auto Electric Station
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Roecoe R. Hull. Prop.
106 W. Main
Phone 812
snow in getting through the big cuts
on the grade near Power- A high
wind that recently struck this region,
gathered up tumble weeds from idle
fields for miles around and bowled
them into the fences. They kept pil
ing up and in many instances the
posts were snapped off, the wires
loosened and then the weed spun
along and piled up in the railroad
| cuts
The day after the big breeze the
j cuts were so chocked with the debris
I that the morning train could not pro
I ceed until the trainmen burned the
i weeds.
!
Considerable damage was done in
! the community to fences and small
1 outlying structures.
j -
j DIXON PROPOSES
JUDICIAL SAVING
Helena—Satisfied that not less than
$10,000 a year can be saved the state
if Jefferson county be detached from
the judicial district which now in
Beaverhead and Madiston
j eludes
. counties, and attached to the First
j j»dicial district, now including only
Lewis and Clark county, Governor
3 (,se Ph M. Dixon has announced he
does n °t intend to name a successor
J u< h» e W. A. Clark who died sud
denlj,* last week.
While the governor has not ofiicial
fr c ' a H ed the attention of the as emb
fr the matter, he has d scuss< d the
I m atter informal y , end i - expected
1 a w '^ be nrtrotfnr d ; • ttach
Jpff^i'- S °n county to this d s
CLEAN CARBON ON MANY EVILS
I
Red Lodge—County Attorney C. C.
Rowan is engaged in securing evi-
i dcnce from every part of the county
in an effort to stop all further trif-
! fic in moonshine and liquors, to
close all houses of ill fame and also
to prevent the use of punchboards
with a view of securing jail sentences.
He said that he will also try to size
all property used in violation of the
laws.
In discussing the campaign, Mr.
Rowan said:
I have no desire to either play un
fairly with any one or to cause any
undue persecution, but it has come to
my notice that in many points in
Carbon county there are flagrant vio
it
lations of the laws being practiced
every day. These must stop. It I
find it necessary I will prosecute to
the limit. Cash fines will not suffice.
I intend to insist on jail sentences
for gamblers, persons engaging in
illicit liquor traffic, and questionable
resorts.
NEW COUNTIES COSTLY
70 PEOPLE WORKING
Lewistown—Seventy persons are
being employed at the court house
here in transcribing and transferring
the records for the new county of
Judgith Basin. Some of these em
ployes belong to the regular force of
County Clerk and Recorder Lehman's
office. The work is going on as rap
idly as conditions will permit. The
county commissioners are not allow
ing a night shift to be worked, as this
would require too much expense for
light and heat
R 0U ndup--Several hundred tax
p a y ers G f this county have signed
a petition asking for a grand jury in
vestigation of the seed grain dealers
an{ | a j 80 the expenditure of county
SEEKING GRAND JURY
ON SEED GRAIN DEAL
funds by the commissioners. The pe
tition has been sent to District Judge
Horkan, Judge Horkan has asked
County Attorney Maris to investigate
the matter and save the county this
expense and on the results of Mr.
Marie' investigation he will determine
whether or not he will call a grand
jury.
ALL TAXES ARE MET
BY FARM BORROWERS
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Kalsipell—The Kalispell National
Farm Loan association finished 1920
with all taxes paid by all of the 149
members. In addition, none cf the
amortization payments went delin
quent on a total of $417,500 loaned
in this district.
The association has le^n able to ac.
cumulate a fund of $2.997.50 from its
profits, to b"! used, in helping the
members meet the'r payments in lean
years
At the annual meeting the directors
were re-elected. They are W. S. Mc
Cormick, Michael Greig, E- L- Kelley,
William Cusick. Louis Fehlberg, and
J. E. White. The secretary-treasurer
is I. D, Rognlien.
PIONEERS OF PARK
COUNTY NAME DATE
Livingston—The second Wednesday
in October has been designated by the
Park County Pioneers as the date
for the annual meeting of the as
sociation. A formal constitution and
by-laws, drafted .by a committee, re
ceived unanimous approval. George
W. Husted presided at the meeting.
LOYALTY OATH DRAWS PROTEST
Livingston—A protest against the
passage of the bill to require all
teachers in the schools of Montana
to take an oth of allegiance, has been
made by Professor B. A. Winans,
superintendent of the Livingston
public schools in a letter to Senator
C. S. Hefferlin.
Professor Winans says that disloy
al teachers will readily take the oath
and continue teaching their doctrines.
The proposed law is a reflection on
the teachers of the state, according
to his view, and while he does not
question the motives of the author of
the bill, he questions the wisdom of
such a law.
He believes better results would
be obtained by reporting disloyalty to
the board of education employing a
teacher or to the state board of
education.
DECLINES TO BEG
A NEW BONUS BILL
Livingston—Ernest W. Shaw, sup
ervisor of the local forest reserve,
refuses to "beg my friends or ac
quaintances to in turn beg congress
for a living wage for its employes.
If congress withdraws bonus many
of us will have to quit, but we'll step
out of government service proudly
with our heads up.
M
He so advised Dorr Skeels, of the
forest service at Missoula, who wired
Shaw to request the Chamber of Com
merce and individuals to wire the
Montana delegation to have the bonus
section restored to the appropriation
bill.
FLATHEAD WINTER
LIKE SIX YEARS AGO
■- '.n
Poison—The nearest approach in
mildness to the present winter in the
Flathead country was in 1914-1915
when the lake boats ran all the time,
according to F. P. Brown, local weath
er bbservor. For eight days that
winter the boats broke ice. So far
this winter, however, there has been
no ice sufficient to bother the boats
and the lowest temperature sof ar
recorded has been 14 above. Six
years ago the minimum record was
two above.
MANY FARMERS IN GRAIN PACT
Lewistown—Contracts for over 1,
000,000 bushels of wheat have been
signed up in the Judith Basin district
by the Montana Wheat Growers' as
... j m» oi
sociation, announced C. M. Strawman
of Moccasin, secretary and treasurer
of the organization- The growth of
the association and the success of the
movement has astonished even the
BUTTE REPORTS SPUD SURPLUS
most sanguine boosters
_
Butte—With the decent of a flock
of potato peddlers upon the residence
regions of Butte, at least one factor
in the high cost of living received
what is known in some circles as a
solar plexus blow. Housewives were
able to buy the best spuds from the
vendors' wagons at $1.25 to $1.50
per 100 pounds, depending on the dis
tance hauled and on the business
ability of both buyer and seller. More
stored in regions near Butte which
than 40,000 sacks of potatoes are
stored in Butte warehouses, dealers
say, and at least an equal number are
depend upon the city for a market,
Thus Butte has at its disposal 80.
000 sacks and perhaps more to last
until the new crop comes in. This
is almost equal to a year's supply.
If you like the Courier come in,
and pay your subscription.
Everyone Should
Drink Hot Water
in the Morning
Wash away all the stomach, liver,
and bowel poisons before
breakfast.
. . __. . ,_._. . J
to feel clean Inside; no sour bile to
coat your tongue and sicken your
breath or dull your head; no constipa
tion, bilious attacks, sick headache,
colds, rheumatism or gassy, acid stom
you ba°thoTutsidetevistlymoro
important, because the skin pores do
not absorb impurities Into the blood,
while the bowel pores do, says a well
known physician.
To keep these poisons and toxins
well flushed from the stomach, liver,
. kidneys and bowels, drink before break
fast each day, a glass of hot water
with a teaspoonful of limestone phos
phate In it. This will cleanse, purify
and freshen the entire alimentary tract,
before putting more food Into the
stomach.
Get a quarter pound of limestone
phosphate from your pharmacist. It
Is inexpensive and almost tasteless,
except a sourish twinge which Is not
unpleasant. Drink phosphated hot
c-ory morning to rid your sys
tem of these vile poisons and toxins;
also to prevent their ^ formation.
To feel like young folks feel; like
you felt before your blood, nerves and
muscles became saturated with an ac
cumulation of body poisons, begin this
treatment and above all, keep It up?
As soap and hot water act on the skin,
cleansing, sweetening and purifying, so
limestone phosphate and hot water be
fore breakfast, act on the stomach,
liver, kidneys and bowels.
It's a cinch
to figure
Camels
why
sell!
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N||f You should know why Camels
are so unusual, so refreshing, so
satisfying. First, quality— second,
Camels expert blend of choice Turkish
and choice Domestic tobaccos which
you'll certainly prefer to either kind
smoked straight !
Camels blend makes possible that
wonderful mellow mildness—yet all the
desirable body is there ! And, Camels
never tire your taste!
You'll appreciate Camels freedom
from any unpleasant cigaretty after
taste or unpleasant cigaretty odor l
For your own satisfaction compara
Camels pu ff by puff with any ciga~
rette in the world at any price /
iM pmcke&na of70 dg»~
Wi
C.
41
iWi
&
ant »olé m*mrywh*r» in »cmaHéonl
ntt— tor 30 «MI t»; or torn pmck*#e* ( 3 — ____
ypr • cornrmd cmrton. Wm ntrongiy neonmnnd thin omrton tor flw
aoom or offlo* mmpptj or whon you t—L
It J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO CO, WlasKm SaWn», N. C,
BLEND m
«to 9
DEINE. HOT TEA
FOE Â BAD COLD
_ , . n • .
hfrmacv Take a
Breast Tea at any pharmacy. ia«e a
iMtmpoaai ^ ot the tea, put a cup of
boding water upon it, pour through a
sieve and drink a teacup full at any
time during the day or before retiring,
It is the most effective way to break a
cold and cure grip, as it opens me
pores of the skin-, relieving congestion.
Also loosens the bowels, thus driving a
cold from the system.
Try it the next time you suffer from
a cold or the grip. It is inexpensive
aBd en ti r ely vegetable, therefore safe
and harmless,
LUMBAGO RIGHT OUT
Eub Fain and Stiffness away with
a small bottle of old honest
St Jacobs Oil
When your back is »ore and lame or
lumbago, sciatica or rheumatism has
you stiffened up, don't suffer! Get a
36 cent bottle of old, honest ''St.
9* 1 " at 'inti,
tfce • in OT ^ by the time you
c(nm t fifty, the soreness and lameness
is gone.
Don't stay crippled! This soothing,
penetrating oil needs to be used only
once. It takes the ache and pain right
out of your back and ends the misery.
It is magical, yet absolutely harmless
and doesn't bum the skin.
Nothing else stops lumbago, sciatica
and lame back misery so promptly!
TOO MANY ADMINISTRATORS
There are too many men desiring
to be administrators of the estate of
Sarkus Joseph, the Willow Creek
merchant who was recently killed in
an automobile accident and as a re
suit a legal battle is likely to develop.
Alford Yergey, public administrator
has applied for letters of administra
tion on, Joseph's estate. Eugene
Thorndike, the Willow Creek banker,
has also applied for letters and now
comes word that relatives of the de
ceased in Butte are objecting to both
of these men. The hearing will be
on January 24. '
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ALMONDINE
A preparation for chapped hands, face or lips, or
any roughness of the skin.
It is not sticky or greasy. Indispensable to gentle
men after shaving.
25c the bottle
Roecher's Drug Store
Phone 327
116 E. Main
Prescriptions a Specialty
OLD TIME RELIGIAN
BISHOP BURN'S CURE
Roundup—Old fashioned religion is
what the world needs, Bishop Charles
Wesley Burns, head of the Helena
area of the Methodist Episcopal
church told the Roundup Commercial
club at a banquet here.
He stated that the ideals of Ameri
ca have been lowered since the close
of the war and a period of pessimism
and suspicion tainted the atmosphere
of business. He blames capital, la
bor and business alike for these
things and urges the strong support
I of organized religion by business
I men as a business measure to cor
rect the evils resulting from past war
extravagances.
! KLEINSCHMIDT WILL
SUCCEED SCHMIDT BROS.
Announcement is made that E. H.
Kleinschmidt has purchased the iiw
terest of his former partner OttV
Schmidt in the cigar and candy busi
ness formerly conducted under the
name of Schmidt Bros, and will in
the future conduct the business alone
The firm has been in business for
several years and has enjoyed a most
satisfactory trade. It is Mr. Klein
schmidt's intention to make some al
terations and changes in the store
and to enlarge the business in a num
ber of ways. The business will re
main in the same location, where Mr.
Kleinschmidt has been doing business
for nearly 14 years.
VESPER SERVICE STARTED
AT PRESBYTERIAN CHURC H
Last Sunday afternoon marked the
inauguration of a new-vesper service
at the Presbyterian church. The ser
vice included a good musical program
consisting of vocal and instrumental
solos and choir singing. A short ser
mon was delivered by the Rev. H- C.
Klemme- An unusually good attend
ance was present, the church beina
practically full. It has been announc
| ed that vesper services of this na
ture will be held the first and third
Sundays of every month and that
there will be no evening services on
the days when the vesper service is
held. '

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