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The Bozeman courier. (Bozeman, Mont.) 1919-1954, January 19, 1921, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075113/1921-01-19/ed-1/seq-6/

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Local Comment
cutivé officers. President Wilson, be
, Kio u 0 „; 0 , „t
l ; ttle wisdom has been notorious for
One of the chief causes for the la
mentable failure of the democratic
administration, both national and
state, was the poor caliber of the
appointments of the different exe
the^poor^men he haTp^d for of-!
ices, from cabinet ministers to the|
most lowly federal appointees. Cover
nor Stewart, more fortunate in his
choice than the president, has never!™™,
been greatly distinguished for the
wisdom of his different selections.
And now the republican party, by
big majorities in both state and na
tion, comes into power. New appoin
tive officers will take their places all
ever the country. As yet but few
appointments have been made. So
far as state appointments go the only
one that has aroused much comment
in Bozeman is that of Major Charles
L Sheridan as adjutant general, an
appointment which has met with uni-|
versai favor, both in Bozeman and
elsewhere in Montana There are two'
appointments in Bozeman that * 1
ways arouse general interest, that of j
the post office and the land office.
There are several men aspiring to
each of these offices. While party ser
vice should be taken into consideration
ai
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in making these appointments, there
is an even more important qualif
ication which must be made a potent
factor in the selection, that is service
to the general public. Speaking gen
erally, and without personal applic
ation to the present incumbents of
these to offices, the democrats fell
down because they did not appoint
strong men. The republicans should
benefit by their opponents' mistakes
and put in men who will not only
add strength and dignity to these
two offices, but who will make com
petent public servents as well. That
is what these men are, public servents
and in making the appointments, the
republicans should consider first the
general public whose businecs tacoC
men handle. Good men in appointive
offices will pave the way for anothes
republican victory four years from
Strict pai*ty affiliations sould
now.
not be the deciding factor.
It is gratifying to a Gallatin coun
ty man, be he either republican or
democrat, to go to Helena and hear
the comments of the legislators on
.
-allai 'ns representation this year,
The four men whom Gallatin sent to
Im U na this yeai are making good.
T.iey are making friends and distin
guishing themselves by sane, forward
looking, constructive work. In a leg
p âture which is conceded to be the
best for many years, Gallatin's rep
resentation has the name of being one
of the best in Helena,
from another county said Saturday,
.
i ou ia. latin people should be proud
of > our delegation. There isn't a
v ea v man on it, even in this year of
% ti men it stands out as one of the
strong delegations in the assembly.
As a senator
»
POULTRY
Isn't it about time for one of those dandy chicken
dinners? X ou know what a "hit" they always make.
AA e have a fine selection of chickens for you to
choose irom now'—frying chickens, roasting chickens and
stewing chickens.
Or, if you prefer some other kind of poultry—or a
good juicy roast—we can give you just what you want.
PRICES AND MEAT THAT MEET YOUR FAVOR
FOERSCHLER'S MARKET
GEORGE 'FOERSCHLER, Proprietor.
In Robinson-Willson Store.
Telephone No. 196
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:
Life's
i Pleasures
are bestowed by destiny upon those who
have the judgment to practice frugality
and foresight.

i
Don't spend all you
on the passing show. Good things
earn
come
To
Those Who Save Now
I
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Join the growing number of
young men
who have a savings account in our care.
i
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Security Bank ® Trust
Co. I
30 West Main Street.
President: H. S. BUELL.
Cashier: W. N. PURDY.
Vice President; A. G. BERTHOT |
Assist. Cashier: J. L. KETTEREB |
5
Active steps will soon be taken to
submit the proposition of a city man
ager form of civic government to the
people of Bazeman. It will be for the
voters of the city to decide. Hehe is
the proposition in a nut-shell- We
don't know just what a city manager
will be able to do for Bozeman. But
we do know that the city manager
form of government has proved the
best thing for other small cities the
size of Bozeman, It has saved them
money and given them a better gov-1
eminent. W e also know that some
j «■•»* must be done here for the city
! is going further and further into
i debt with ever y P assin £ y ear . despite
'he best efforts of the mayor and
cl 'y "" ncd - Tt l! "m^r an cl council
"• givmg the city their best efforts,
they are honest and able business
but they cannot take the place
" f » <**, manager. They cannot give
the C1 'V s >>usiness the attention is
must have to be a success. Are we
to keep on going further and further
in the hole or are we to try the only
available means of getting out? No
one guarantees that the city manager
!
! form of government will be a cure
all for every civic evil, but at least it
offers our only hope. Shall we take
it or not? That answer lies with the
voters at the spring election. We
believe that most of them think as
do that it is far better to take
j
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?.' ha " ce than 10 ke ™ on * omg down
I
we
The agitation which is going on
throughout the country over the pro
posed Sunday blue laws is causing
some comment here in Bozeman. The
advocates for these laws find little
sympathy here. There are too many
independent thinkers here, too many
who love the great out of doors and
who spend their Sundays there, to
make many advocates for Sunday
blue laws. As one man put it,
I believe in it.
belong to a church.
work for it and contribute to its sup
« port. But in the summer time I spend
| my Sundays in the canyons, under
the pines or along some rushing creek
where everything is clean and fresh
and sweet. A man can worship, no
I
».
matter where he happens to be and
to my mind these everlasting hills
are just as grand, just as much of a
temple, as any edifice erected by hu
man hands. The question of how to
spend Sunday is one that every man
must decide for himself, as for me, I
prefer to spend mine in the open,
nearer to nature and perhaps nearer
to God.
M
FARM BARN DESTROYED
BY FIRE SATURDAY
The bam on the Walter Beck farm
northeast of Belgrade was destroyed
by fj re Saturday morning and quite
a i oss suffered- It fs thought that
the fire was caused by sparks from a
Northern Pacific engine, the tracks
being not far from the barn. Two
calves were burned to death and a
number of sets of good harness, some
hay and grain and other supplies
were lost- The strong wind prevented
any attempts to save the barn from
being successful, though
buildings were burned. There was
i SO me insurance on the property but
whether or not it will cover the loss
no other farm
,
is not known.
CAMPAIGN AGAINST
OLEMARGERINE STARTED
The creameries of the state are
putting on a campaign to secure leg
islation raising the tax on oleomar
i day.
this product in preference to butter
as they can make more money on it.
gerine in order to save the dairy in
dustry and those engaged in it from 1
complete bankruptcy. More and more |
oleomargerine and kindred products
are being used in this state every t
Many merchants are pushing j
| Margarme sells at 3« to 31 cents
wholesale, and unless something
done, butter will have to meet that
price within a very short time,
IS
It is not the intention of the cream
eries to raise the price of butter, as
this cannot be done in Montana in
competition with butter from other
states. It is their desire, however,
to protect the dairy industry, to be
able to sell their product, and secure
protection against ruinous competi
tion from cheap vegetable oil imita
tions.
A tax on these imitations will cur
tail their use and stimulate the use
of more butter. Besides, it will pro
vide a neat income for the state. The
situation is critical, and everyone in
terested in the dairy industry should
make it a point to sign one of these
petitions at once- No time can be
lost as we must get this thing before
the legislature now- The petition will
be at your creamery from Jan. 15th.
to 22nd. Do not neglect to drop in
and sign it. Your support is neces
sary. If you neglect it you will have
yourself to blame if conditions grow
worse instead of better.
ARTISTS TO ASSIST
BOZEMAN LIBRARY
Lillian Briggs Peterson, whose
singing has delighted Bozeman audi
ences a number of times this winter,
_ , , ,
will make her last public appearance
} here in a concert to be given the
evening of January 2o at the Presby
tenan church for the benefit of the
Bozeman public, library. Assisting
Mrs. Peterson will be Miss June Hart
man, piano; Tony Blish, violin artist
fith the sympothetic touch and
Rev. H. C. Klemme, organ. The con
cert will be given under the auspices
of the Bozeman Woman's club with
the idea or raising enough money to
keep the library running through the
balance of the year- Owing to nec
essary repairs and other expendi
tures the library fund is completely
exhausted and with the city running
on a new financial basis there will
be no money available to keep the
library open unless it cames from
other than municipal sources. With
this idea in mind the Woman's club
has gotten behind this concert and ex
pects a good attendance.
Mrs. Peterson, whose husband has
been stationed at the college as a
vocational man, will leave for Min
neapolis after the concert, hence this
will be the last opportunity to hear
her in public appearance. She has a
most delightful voice and has been
most favorably commented upon by
local critics, a* well as by well known
musical authorities in the Twin Cit
ies, her home, and other places where
she has sung.
HELENA BESTS BOZEMAN
IN VOLLEYBALL GAME
Helena came off with the long end
of the score in a volleyball match
with the Bozeman team in the Helena
Y. M. C. A. Saturday evening. New
to the Helena floor and nervous in
their first matched games of the sea
son the Bozeman men played far be
low form in the first two games and
the Helena team had no difficulty in
annexing the first two of the three
games necessary to win the match.
In the third game the Bozeman team
picked up and played some real vol
leyball, winning that game and the
one following. The final and deciding
game of the match was hard fought
throughout, both teams taking their
j opponents' service time after time.
Helena's steadiness finally won ount
and their team took the game 15 to 11.
Following the game a very pleasant
little banquet was enjoyed by the
members of the two teams and talks
were made by Captain Donaldson of
Helena and Captain Holms of Boze
man. Dr. E. O. Holm, captain, J. R.
Parker, R. O. Wilson, E. L. Currier.
H- P. Griffin, Chester Morton and
Frank Stone played on the Bozeman
team. The local aggregation are by
no means satisfied with the outcöme
of the match and hope to hove a re
trun match in Bozeman before the
time for the state tournament in
Butte,
NEW INSTRUCTORS FOR
MONTANA STATE COLLEGE
Announcement has been made of
the addition of two members to the
extension staff of the Montana State
college. R. B- Millin, formerly con
nected with the University of Idaho,
has been engaged as livestock exten
sion specialist, to begin work this
month. Mr. Millin graduated from
the Pennsylvania State college, work
ed for a time as sheep and wool in
vestigator for the federal department
and later took his master's degree at
Idaho.
Miss Anna M. Turley a graduate
of Purdue university who took special
work at Columbia and nas been con
nected with the extension department
at the Oregon State college has been
appointed state leader of the home
demonstration agents in Montana.
Miss Turley was on the program for
Farmers' Week.
HOT-SHOT GASOLINE
I
The premium that is paid for a QUALITY product is REFUNDED
again and again in the cash value of the increased SATISFACTION
it gives.
OUR HOT-SHOT GASOLINE
GIVES YOU THIS SATISFACTION AT A LESS PREMIUM
It has the snap and pep that you appreciate these cold mornings.
Why not get the best for less money?
STORY MOTOR SUPPLY, Inc.
HOT SHOT GAS AT BOTH STATIONS 35c
4
J. R. Cochran, Mgr.
Phones 390 and 476
33 1-3% OFF ON OLDFIELD TIRES UNTIL FEBRUARY 1st
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
IS TONIC AT BANQUET
Friday evening the Hi-Y club stag
ed a most successful banquet, the
dinner being served by the ladies of
the Presbyterian church. This is the
first of a series of monthly Hi-Y
banquets, the next to be held on Feb
ruary 4 and at which the "father and
son" movement will be fostered.
Christian Fellowship was the topic
at Friday's meeting and it was most
ably discussed by Rev. R. P. Smith
and Prof. W. M. Cobleigh of the col
lege. Warren B. Maddox of the "Y"
acted as toastmaster and made a very
good impression. Rev. Smith pointed
out the ideal relations of friendship ;
and told what cou.'d be accomplished
by it and through it
Prof. Coblicgh talked on "Christian
Fellowship and the Student
pointed out that the state was not
supporting the higher educational in
stitutions that the students might
earn larger salaries after they were
through, but-that they could better
serve humanity
end
JOINT INSTALLATION
HELD FRIDAY NIGHT
A joint installation was held in the
American Legion hall Friday night
by the Western Star Lodge No. 4
and the Norma Rebekah lodge No. 9. j
of the Independent Order of
Fellows. The feature of the evening
was the bestowal of decorations and
Odd
was
jewels upon two local members
B. Streets of Helena, department com
mander, conferred the decoration of
chivalry, the highest local order, on
Phil Dodson for 35 years service as
recording secretary and the lodge
gave him a jewel in recognition of
his services. W. E- Rider was given
a jewel by the Rebekahs in recogni
tion of 25 years service.
R.
The officers installed by the West
ern Star lodge were: Noble grand,
Nie Aakjer; vice president, O. E. Keyes;
secretary, W. D. Bell; treasurer, J.
Lew Gracey; warden C. P. Nunnelly;
conductor, John Aakjer; right suppor
ter noble grand, J. N. Pratt; left
supporter noble grand, H. A. Bolinger;
right supporter vice grand, F, H. Ca
ven; left supporter vice grand, J- W.
McLees; right seal supporter, William
Sterzik; left seal supporter, George
Card; inner guard, Frank Gray, out
er guard, Francis Walker; chaplain,
William F- Cowan. .
The Norma Rebekah lodge installed
the following officers: Noble grand,
Osa G. Westlake; vice grand, Mrs.
J. W. Labertew; recording secretary,
Minnie Knodler; financial secretary,
Della Pike; treasurer, Ida Truman;
warden, Alice Nunnelly; conductor,
Pete M. BeU; right support noble
grand, D. E. Moser; left support noble
grand, Ellen Moser; çight support
vice grand, Mrs. Barker; left support
vice grand, Nell K. Andrews; inside
guard, Mrs. M. L. Stevens; outer
guard, J. M. Holderby; chaplain, Min
nie Brandriff.
COLLEGE ASSISTANT
MARRIED IN FORSYTH
Howard L. Seamans, a graduate of
the college and at present an assist
ant in the entomology department
was married in Forsyth on January
to Miss Mildred Eckles, a former stu
dent at the college. Mr. and Mrs.
Seamans are now settled in their
home at 904 South Grand
REBEKAHS ELECT OFFICERS
At the regular meeting of the oux
iliary of the Rebekahs, held Tuesday
afternoon in the social room of the
I, O. O. F. hall, the following officers
elected; President, Mrs. Martha
were
Stevens: vice president. Mrs. Minnje
Brandriff; secretary, Miss Ida Tru
man: treasurer, Miss Alice Nunnelly.
There was a large attendance at the.
meeting and several hours were
pVasantly spent. At the close of the
afternoon refreshments were served
bv Mrs. H. A. Bolineer. Mrs. M. Hold
erby, Miss Alice Nunnelly and Mis?
Etta Gracey.
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EXCELLENT VALUES
IN JEWELRY
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You will find your desires for big values in jewelry
realized at Pease's. We want just as much as you do to
protect the buying power of your dollars. Only by such
a policy can we progress in business
And as jewelry is such an important detail of style
in both women's and men's attire, we make a feature of
the new fashions in rings, bracelets, necklaces, cuff links,
watch chains, and other articles, offering values that
extra good even in these days when prices have been gener
ally lowered.
are
CUFF LINKS $1.50 to $25.00
H. A. PEASE & CO.
Jewelers and Optometrists
West Main Street
THE HALLMARK STORE
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Patronize Our Advertisers
There Will Be No Regrets
i
AUCTION SALE!
I WILL OFFER FOR SALE TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER AT
THE RESIDENCE OF P. W- WEISMANDEL.
515 SOUTH 7th AVENUE ON
Saturday, January 22
AT 1:15 P. M. THE FOLLOWING
1—Fine Kimbal Player
Piano.
1—Fine Oak Dining Table.
6—Fine Oak Leather Seated
Chairs.
1—Fine Large Phonograph.
1— Brass Bed, Mattress and
Springs.
2— Iron Beds, Mattress and
Springs.
1—9 x 12 Rug.
6—Smaller Rugs.
Tubs, Fruit Jars, Cooking utensils, Pictures, Dishes and other
• articles too numerous to mention.
1— Good Vacuum Cleaner.
2— Rockers.
2—Arm Chairs.
6 Sectional book case.
200 Volumes of Fine Books
1— Oak Dresser.
2— Sanitary Cots.
2—Enameled Wash Stands.
1—Laundry Stove.
1—Sewing Machine.
1— Mirror.
2— Hand Sleds.
1—Washing Machine.
St
_ ïljr , rsâ . imr i
f. W, WEISMaWDEI ,
* Awrxr»n
OWNER
TERMS;—Cash, unless you make other arrangements with
owner prior to sale. Free Buss will leave Tracy and Main at 1:00
p. m. sharp- - .♦* >
TT
. TOM SILKERSON
■ AUCTIONEER

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