OCR Interpretation


The Bozeman courier. (Bozeman, Mont.) 1919-1954, March 23, 1921, Image 4

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075113/1921-03-23/ed-1/seq-4/

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THE FINISHING TOURCHES
Strong, specially selected human hair nets in all shades, jj
5 Resterilized before packed.
15c TWO FOR 25c
Every net guaranteed and, if not sitisfied, just tell us,
and we will replace.
0
g 10 E. Main Phone 128 8
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Cox-Poetter Drug Co.

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GALLATIN POST NO. 14
AMERICAN LEGION ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
ANNOUNCES ITS FIRST

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Athletic Exhibition
f
—AND—
1
BOXING BILL
AT
ELLEN, Thursday, Mar. 24
I
AT 8:30 P. M.
MAIN EVENT—Fifteen Rounds to Decision
135 Pounds
VIC GRACIO
The Fighting Wop, of Spokane
ED. ENGLEHART
of Billings
SEMI-WINDUP—Eight Rounds to Decision
135 Pounds
EDDIE HATHAWAY, Cheyenne, Wyo.
KID AMOS, Casper ...
0
SECOND PRELIMINARY—Three Rounds to Decision
145 Pounds
SCOTTY MACDONALD, Bozeman
ANDY BOLLIN, Belgrade
0
FIRST PRELIMINARY—Three Rounds to Decision
TWO BOZEMAN UNKNOWNS
-O
Reservations at Ellen Parlors, Phone 231 I
Ladies Especially Invited. |
No Smoking
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o
PERSONNEL
Judges—Adjutant General Charles L. Sheridan,, Frank L. Boedecker. I
Announcer—Justin M. Smith. f
Inspectors—A. F. McCune, Roy Keister.
PHYSICIANS— Dr. H. H. Judd, Dr. C. F. Jump. I
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See This Book of
"Cornell Interiors
V
\V e want to show you this new collection of views
that illustrate the variety and charm of paneled inte*
riois so easily and economically obtained by using
MILL PRIMED TRIPLE SIZED
takes the place cf lath and plaster for 'walls, ceilings, and partitions
Come in and see the finished effects that you can re'
produce in your heme, c"ore, ofh
factory, garage or outbuiH'nsn
Cornell 32
__ 0 _ with
ell u.8" widths.
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er dornen
Springtime is repairing time— sa com; to us
for roofing, flooring, fencing, or any other
building materials that you need for making \\
your home or property more at'
tractive and valuable. Phone or
call —we're anxious to be of
service to you.
ill!
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Copeland Lumber Company
We sell everything to build anything
i 1 1 t a i > -rt
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WANTED-Clean Cotton Bags
MONTANA NEWS
MOVIE MAN IN PLANE
ON YELLOWSTONE TRAIL
»
Miles City—Instructions from a pic
torial weekly moving picture concern
to Joseph Leighton, promoter of the
Buffalo Rapid electrical plant pro
ject authorize Mr. Leighton to have
the YelIowstone vall ey from Forsyth
to Glendive photographed from an
• air_plane ' for P ur P° s es of exhibition.
BACHELORS WILL FIGHT NEW
TAX
Miles City—Organization of an as
■ sociation of unmarried, adult males
i was inaugurated here today for the
purpose of raising a fund to em
ploy counsel to contest in the su
preme court the validity of the so
called bachelors' tax. The movement
has met with quick financial re
sponse.
The opposition is based on the fact
that this is a special tax imposed on
one class of the population for the
benefit of another. That those who
pay the tax do not receive the bene
fits of it, which those behind the
movement claim violates the funda
mental principles of all just taxation.
If the state wants a free will of
fering from the bachelors for the
benefit of the widows, they say, that
is one thing, but if it uses its
er to compel what amounts
charitable contribution, that is a dif
ferent matter and an imposition and
a dangerous precedent which they
say every patriotic citizen of the state
should resist by every legal
within his power.
pow
to a
means
CREATE MARKET FOR LODGE
POLE
Missoula—Large
quantities
lodgepole pine, comprising 20 per
cent of the timber supply of the state,
will find an increased sale because
of the estblishment of a $300,000 tie
treating plant by'the Union Pacific
at Pocatello, Idaho. The forest ser
vice sees the disposal of large quan
tities of lodgepole in this district. The
annual cut of this timber is less than
a million feet
of
at present. Two
thirds of the lodgepole is owned by
the government, the remainder " by
private lumbering interests.
It, is said the Milwaukee had in
view at one time the building of a
tie treating plant in this vicinity,
but nothing definite has as yet been
done in the matter.
Already a tentative application
30,000,000 feet on the Madison forest,
in central southern
been filed at the district headquart
in Mjssoula, with prospects of
further utilization as the supply is
consumed. Extensive sales of lodge
pole pine will also be made from the
Beaverhead forest in the same region,
and by district No. 4, south of Po
catello, when the plant is opened for
work.
or
Montana, has
ers
STATE UNIVERSITY
GLEE CLUB TO TOUR
BITTER ROOT VALLEY
Missoula—The
State University
Glee club will make a tour of the
Bitter Root valley March 24, 25 and
26, showing Thursday night in Cor
vallis, Friday .evening in
ville, and Saturday afternoon in Vic
Stevens
tor. The trip will be made in auto
mobiles.
The sate-wide glee club trip will
start March 31, It includes Livings
ton. Big Timber, Red Lodge, Laurel,
Billings, Roundup, Harlowton, Lewis
tewn. Belt, Great Falls and Helena.
It will appear in Missoula April 12.
A special trip will then be made April
15, 16 and 17 to Butte, Anaconda and
Deer Lodge.
YOUNG TEDDY WILL TOUR
ROOSEVELT.
„ rru j *
Ga.sgow—Theodore Roosevelt, Jr.,
w 11 tour the Roosevelt trail this year
if plans made by the Roosevelt High
way association prevail, it was learn
cd by L. E. Jones of Glasgow, secrc
tary of the Montana division of the
trail.
u haS returned from 'Devil's
Lake, where he attended a meeting
of the North Dakota division.
TWO COMMISSIONERS
ARE APPOINTED
Roundup—George W. Handel of
Musselshell and H. R. MacDonald of
Roundup have been appointed mem
bers of the Musselshell county board
by District Judge Horkan. They suc
ceed C. A. Henninger and John Sol
wick, who have resigned. There were
about 20 applicants for the vacancies.
Both appointees vfll serve two years,
when an entirely new board will be
electçd.
FARM BUREAU MAKES
1,000 MEMBERSHIP
Hamilton—A campaign for mem
bers is the first thing being taken up
this year by the Ravalli county farm
bureau. Th e membership of 1920
was 545- It is believed by the of
ficers that the campaign wiH bring
the list up to 1,000. Meetings are
being held in the various localities
in the county to explain the
of the bureau.
purposes
I
t
GOPHER POISON READY j
- I
Malta—Forty thousand pounds of
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40,000 POUNDS OF •
gopher bait have been prepared this
month and preparations are being
made to distribute it throughout the
county. The Phillips county farm
bureau h d-tcrrr.*-rc' tc do all it can
, this year toward extermination of the
1 gopher pest in the county.

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ROAD SIi*.
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Great Falls.—. k >
l r $1,125
McKinster sued for $1,810 for the
^ oss head of cattle in shipment
^ rom Craig to Great Falls and thence
to Vaughn, claiming that the ship
nient Ç at tle from Great Falls
was unauthorized, during cold weath-J
was given Harry M Ilmster against
j the Great Northern Railway company
' by a jury in district court.
er.
In the controversy over the valuç
of the cattle, the jury apparently ac
cepted a compromise on the demand
of McKinster. W. R. Armstrong
foreman of the jury.
was
BUTTE TAXI DRIVES
MAY INSTAL LAYETTE
Batte— Escorting babies into the
world in his taxicab is one of the
pleasant features of Jerry Shyne's
job, and it is becoming so frequent
he i s thinking of installing a layette.
"It's service that we give," explains
Jerry.
Shyne is a drives &>r the Butte
company. Last
August he was called to a certain j
home in this city and engaged to
drive a passenger to one of the local
hospitals. When he arrived at his
destination a second party piled out.
A similan experience was enjoyed by
Jerry yesterday.
Cab and Transfer
SEED COMPANY PLANS
TO SELL WAREHOUSE
Livingston.—A. L. Stone, represen
tative ox* the Alfred Brown Seed
pany, owners of the seed warehouse
on the Northern Pacific right-of-way,
just west of Livingston, announced
while transacting business here that
his company is planning to dispose
of the warehouse and withdraw from
this field.
com
- "Failure to obtain the
necessary con
tracts for seed growing is given as
the reason for the contemplated with
drawal. According to Mr. Stone the
According to Mr. Stone the
Brown company obtained a greater
acreage before it established its ware
house here than it has enjoyed since
the construction.
Other seed
companies, without
warehouses here, have increased their
business extensively.
DIES FROM EFFECT OF
MOONSHINE POISON
Anaconda—Adois
known
after the
Leader, better
as Gus Linder, died shortly
noon hour Monday in the
^yjail from what the authorities
think was moonshine poisoning. He
was first noticed about 10:30 o'clock
Monday morning staggering down the
alley between Comercial and
Park
avenues in the direction of Cedar
street.
He was so intoxicated that
. dld not appear to know in what
direction he was wandering and ran
or k-iaped into buildings and tele
8 ra I ^ poles a number of times. On
reac F-ingr Cedar street he fell full
len S th cn the pavement and members
the file department
I , department went to his
a ssistance and picked him up. Thev
J Placed him in the municipal repair
shop, and then, thinking he might
contract pneumonia there, transfer
red him to the jail corridor.
Thinking
u- " he might recover from
his stupor and frighten some of the
women emp.cyed in tlie city hall Chief
of Police 0'i.rien and Officer O'Neill
placed him on a cot in one of • the
cells shortly before
. On his
return from lunch, Mr. O'Neill went
into the cell to ascertain the man's
condition and discovered he Was dead,
—.—- __
noon.
INSURANCE MAN WILL
HOLD STATE MEETING
Butte—The executive committee of
the Insurance Federation of Montana
has decided that the
convention of the Insurance Federa
tion should be held early in April,
instead of July, the month in which
the annual meetings have heretofore
been held. The committee has a 1 so
1921 annual
that the convention this year
will b e held in Butte on April 6 and
7, according to an dficial announce
ment.
V/e believe,
says the report of.
the committee, "that the detailed re
port of our accomplishments at Hel
ena will covince all members that the
federation has eminently justified its
claim on insurance men of Montana
and will make them want to attend
the 1921 convention, „
The committee and officers have
outlined a splendid
speeches and papers, by men rep
resenting all lines of insurance from
Montana, Spokane,
Francisco and Salt Lake.
..
program . of
Portland, San
' ■
MUCH LAND IS LEASED
IN DILLON VICINITY
Dillon—The number of oil leases
filed in during the last few weeks
is the subject of much comment in
The leases are mostly on
land that had been generally consid
ered to be worthless for oil prospect
This land is mostly north of
j Dillon, towards the center of the val
I ley and near the Beaverhead river. It
18 re P orted that drilling is to start
I soon on several sites in Beaverhead
1 county.
Dillon.
mg.
ACHING TOOTH DROVE
BUTTE MAN TO DRINK
■ Butte—Accepting at its face value
I the story by a defendant before him
j on a charge of drunkenness, Police
GALLATIN VALLEY
Ranch For Sale
T t ■ m —tmi —mussssam
MY ENTIRE TRACT OF LAND CONSISTING OF
ONE THOUSAND AND FIFTY ACRES
ONE MILE WEST OF BOZEMAN
$150
AT
PER ACRE
j
GOOD WATER RIGHTS AND IMPROVEMENTS INCLUDED
H. /. BORDER
5^
If Your Engine BalKs

it needs attention apd this is
the repair shop to bring it to.;
We pride ourselves
on our auto
;
repair work, and can take
of all makes
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care
equally well.:
Prompt service and moderate
charges.
WELDING, MACHINE WORK
RAYFIELD CARBURETOR
SERVICE
AUTO REPAIRS
mt'.*
'
Fransham Bros. ^ Needham *


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More farmers arc wearing Goodrich Rub
ber Footwear today thaii ever before.
j
_ he reason for this tremendous ii crease
in userais simple—Goodrich v/cars
longer than other footwear, and farmers
have found it out. Naturally, when a
man buys a pair of Goodrich "Hi
and they last so much longer end are so
much more comfortable, and o mate
rially cut down that 'big footwear bill—»
he's going to tell his friends.
A, *°re and moie farmers are finding out
that Goodrich won't leak, peel
1J — it can't, for it is made in One
Solid Piece—that's the Goodrich
or come
opart
way.
Look for the Red Lins 'round ths Top
when, you buy. 00,000 dealers are now
selling Goodrich.
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The b. F. Goodrich Rubber Company
Akron. OHIO
113 King Street, SEATTLE
-
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Goodrich.
Hi-Press
Rubber Footwear
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Judge Grimes dismissed the case
against the man. He explained he
was frantic with toothache, and not
being able to reach a doctor he took
several drinks of moonshine. The
moonshine, he admitted, knocked him
out, and it also
toothache.
knocked out" the
...
HUGE GOLDE NEAGLE
HIT BY SPEEDING CAR
Winnett.—A huge golden eagle met
an unpoetica Ideath here when it
swooped in front of a speeding auto
mobile driven by R. I- Barton. It col
lided first with the radiator and was
hurled to the ground, where the fatal
injury was inflicted by the hind
wheel of the machine passing over
the great bird's body.

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