OCR Interpretation


The Bozeman courier. (Bozeman, Mont.) 1919-1954, March 23, 1921, Image 7

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075113/1921-03-23/ed-1/seq-7/

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Gallatin Valley Lands''
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Bargains
Nice 6 room house with bath. Two
lots, chicken house and sheds, some
fruit and on paved street. $3,000, half
cash if sold soon.
BUILDING SITE
We have some lots at the comer of
Seventh Avenue and College Street. .
an elegant location, that can be bought :
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445 acres 0{ deeded land ' 320 under I
irrigation, good water right, good
right if taken before spring; if you
are going to build, see these lots.
open water the year round; 5 big
springs on piace. Cut 75 tons of hay
HOW ABOUT THIS
in 1920 and cun produce 150 tons )
75 acres plowed ready to seed in the
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spring. One and one helf miles to
good timber. Fenced and cross cenc
cd- -Relinquishment to 160 acres
leading to open range the year round,
where you can grace 2,000 head of
sheep or other stock equivalent. Two
small houses, granery, good bam and
root house. Best black loam soil,
free from frost. A pleasant place
to live and make money. Two miles
to nearest town and dise to public
school and high school. Finest moun
tain water can be piped into house.
$35.00 per acre and adjoining land
has been selling for $75-00 per acre.
The relinquishment will be thrown in
on sale. Will consider town property
to the value of $3,000. See us for
further information.
;
irrigated j
487 acres, 320 acres
about 325 acres good farm land, bal
lance pasture. 75 acres in hay. 8
room house, bam and machine shed
$65.00 per acre if sold soon.
\
MONEY TO LOAN
CiSKfiCO.
(Over Courier Printing Office)
Phne 127-W
GOVERNMENT TO AID
FARMERS WITH SEED
(Continued from Page One.)
and here all the applications would
be acted on. In order to avoid all
possible delay. Mr. Warburton has
his office so systematized that checks
to successful applicants can be mail
ed out within twenty-four hours af
ter the applications are received.
There will be something like $2,000,
000 available for the farmers of the
four states mentioned. The men from
the different colleges spent the en
tire day with Mr. Warburton and all
possible contingencies regarding the
working of distributing this seed
money were gone into so that there
will be no possible chance for delay.
It was recognized that timeliness in
planting is one of the essential fea
* tures in western farming and be
cause of this everything possible will
be done to expedite loans after ap
plications are received. A complete
list of the Montana men who will
handle the seed loans in the different
Montana counties was furnished to
Mr. Warburton by the Montana ex
tension people.
Attending the meeting Monday
were C. W. Warburton of the United
States department of agriculture; Di
rector F. S. Cooley of the Montana
State college extension service; F. B.
Linfield, director of the Montana ex
periment station; Dr. S. B. Nelson,
extention director for the state of
Washington; M. L. Wilson, Montana
ctounty agent leader; J. C. Taylor
and È. H. Lott, assistant county
agent leaders in Montana; J.
Jacobson of the Idaho bureau of crop
estimates; B. F. Sheehan, seed com
of Idaho; County Agent R.
H.
missioner
E. Bodley of Gallatin county; S. J.
Hampton of the Montana state coun
ty agent's office; John F. Ware,
marketing specialist in Montana; A.
J. Ogaard, crop specialist in Monta
na; Carl Peterson, president of the
Sheridan county farm bureau; R. W.
Peper, representing the Farm Loan
sociation of Whitehall; F. W. Bier,
Jr., of the Montana bureau of crop
estimates; Charles D. Green field,
Montana state commissioner of agri
culture and publicity, and Mrs- Gross,
representing the county commission
of Big Horn county.
a
ers
U. S. SEED LOAN
PLAN OUTLINED
At a conference at the State college
extension service officials of Mon
tana, Idaho and Washington, togeth
with C. W. Warburton of the Unit
ed States department of agriculture,
»■r
made plans for the distribution of fed
eral aid seed money.
Farmers of Montana will be able to
make application through the follow
ing men for aid in their respective
counties :
Fallon and Carter counties, J. O.
Hembre of Baker; Fergus and Judith
Basin counties, Carl Peterson of Lew
istown; Broadwater county, Peter Me
loy o? Townsend; Wibaux county, E.
G. Axtel, Wibaux; Musselshell and
Golden Valley counties, F. W. Bier,
Jr., of Roundup; Toole, Glacier, Pon
dera and Liberty counties, Samuel J.
Hampton, of Shelby; Sheridan and
Daniels counties, Nels Christensen of
Plentywood; Valley county, Murray
Stebbins of Glasgow; Phillips county,
P. Stapleton of Malta; Blaine
county, M. A. Thorfinson of Chinook;
Cascade county, F- E. McSpadden of
Great Falls; Custer and Powder Riv
er counties, C. M. Yerington of Miles
City; Yellowstone county, H. S. Bros
sard of Billings; Chouteau county, D.
W.
W. Jones of Fort Benton; Teton coun
. „ . . s 4
Clarkson ot Choteau; Gar
field county, M. A. Cromwell of Jor
dan; Stillwater county. W. H. Jones
of Columbus; Rosebud county, Paul
j C. C. Wagner of Forsyth; Treasure
(county. Paul C- C- Wagner of For
I syth; Hill county, !.. A. Campbell of
Havre; Roosevelt county,
Dan Noble
of Poplar; Richland county, H. F. De
P ue ot Sidney; Prairie county. G. E.
) Lewis of Terr y; Jefferson county, G.
A ' Gustafson of Boulder; Dawson
I A. Gustafson of Boulder;
county, D. W. Mendenhall of Glen
!
dive.
Farmers of McCone county may
make application through the county
farm bureau agents in Richland, Daw
son, Roosevelt or Prairie counties.
BOOTH BRINGS IN
ARK OF COVENANT
On the last day before the close of
the extraordinary session of the Sev
enteenth assembly, the constitution
was brought out for the 'steenth time
to prove that something the legisla
ture wanted was contrary to the
; acred ark of the covenant " Sena
* I
t' r Eddie Booth, when the upper
c'-amber was considering the oil tax
bill, questioned the validity of every
revenue measure passed at the special
s ss i° n , quoting as his authority a
decision of the state supreme court
in which the powers of the legisla
ture are interpreted in the light of
the constitution.
A compilation is now being made
of the number of times the consti
tution has been dragged out to halt
the progress of the various measures
before the lawmakers. Announce
will be made when the compilation is
complete.
■MHMHI

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MEN'S DEPARTMENT
Have you your new Easter Suit ?
A
N
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Mens and Young Men y s All Wool
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Hand Tailored Suits $30*00
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m
Either made to measure or from our stock
Wi
SUITS FROM $20 UP TO $60
Our stock suits are the Stein-Bloch, than which there are no better
made, and the Irving System clothes.
The made to measure suits are the well known "Shayne-Brun
make, which are famous for their fine tailoring and all wool fabrics of
high class patterns.
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HATS FOR SPRING
Newest models and shapes
$5 to $7
—O—
NEW SPRING TIES
In knitted silk and cut silk
$1 to $3
—O—
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mi
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.jr-.v.-.;
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SPRING TOP COATS
Thoroughly well tailored
$30 to $32.50
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Silk and fine madras shirts
r
Fine linen and silk handkerchiefs
Silk, lisle and high grade hose *
Right grade shoes for men
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OUR COBBLER KNOWS HIS BUSINESS
r •
Willson Company
The
I 1921
1866
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The opinion quoted is that in the
case of State ex rel Bennett, as re
ported in the 40th. Montana reports.
According to Booth, the opinion holds
that the powers of raising revenues
can be exercised only at regular ses
sions of the legislature. The opinion
says, in part:
For ordinary purposes, the legis
lature may not convene offener than
U
once in two years. It can be conven
ed by the governor at other times
for extraordinary purposes. (Const.
Sec. 6, Art. V. Sec. 11, Art. VII.) It
is vested with the power, and is re
quired to provide the necessary rev
enue for the support and mainten
ance of the government, and for this
purpose to levy a uniform rate of tax
ation upon all property in the state,
except such as is exempted by ex
press provisior# of the constitution
itself- (Const. Sec. 1, Art. XII.) Its
power in this behalf is to be exercis
ed in regular session and not at oth
er times, because provision for its
support and maintenance is one of
the ordinary functions of government.
That 4his power should be so exercis
ed is clear from the fact that the
legislative body must convene only at
stated times, except when called in
foreseen
session by the governor to meet un
__i emergencies.
The conference report recommend
ed that the senate recced from its
amendment reducing the tax from 3 !
to 1 per *-ent on oil and that the tax
be made 1 per cent in 1921 and 2 per
cent thereafter. Larson insisted the
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1 per cent tax this year would only
benefit concerns actually producing
now. Booth asked if the conference
committee had eliminated the clauses
for the taxation of gas, and when
advised it had not, expressed regret
up<5n the grounds that this was a
new subject, and would be affected
by the constitutional provision. ;
then cited the Bennett case.
Hg
ed of on a substitute motion of Ed
wards that further consideration of
the measure be indefinitely postpon
ed. It carried 28 to 20.
The conference report was dispos
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GOVERNOR DIXON SIGN 5 BILLS
Governor Joseph M. Dixon has ap
proved five more bills passed by the
special session. The most important
of these is S. B. 9 by Hazelbaker and
Paul, correcting the omission in the
| original bill relating to the registry
( and interest on state warrants.
The original bill provided that all
registered warrants from March 1.
1921, to January 1, 1922, shall bear
interest at 7 per cent. No provision
was made for calling in such regis
tered warrants, but a clause covering
this has been inserted in the amended
bill.
Tuesday in Bozeman on business
Other bills signed are H- B. 16, de
ficiency claim arising out of operation
of law for establishment of terminal
elevator; H. B. 18, appropriation for
purchase of aditional land for the
state school at Boulder; H. B. 20 re
lating to the levy of taxes against
land in irrigation districts having con
tracts with the U. S. reclamation ser
vice and H. B. 22, a corrective meas
ure relating to legal holidays.
Locals
Harry W T hite of Manhattan spent
Colonel Taylor Trent went to Lib
ingston Saturday and called a suc
cessful market day sale at that place,
Carl Widener has returned home
from a business trip to Deer Lodge
and other points.
Mrs. B. T- Stanton of Helena is
spending a few days visiting old time
friends in the city.
Lester Cowan was in Bozeman Sat
urday afternoon from his ranch north
of Manhattan.
Mrs. Peter Karst was in Bozeman
the latter part of the week from the
upper West Gallatin.
Mr and Mr? Al Dior raturnad
j «£' fr„ms^ndin°a STSj. '
1 Helena
Eugene Martin publisher of the
Havre Plaindealer' spenV Sunday and I
Monday in the city.
Mrs. Otto Batch of Trident is spend
ing a few days visiting her mother
Mrs. J. L. Hartman.
Mi\ and Mrs. John Rabe were visi
tors Saturday from this ranch in
Bridger canyon.
Most of the churches In the city are
planning special services for next
Sunday ,Easter, and several good mu
sical programs are being offered.
Mrs. F. Colloden, wno lias been in
Bozeman for the past two weeks as
th^ guest of Mrs. T. B. Story, has
returned to her home in Glendive,
C- F. High, who has been spending
the winter at Hot Springs, Ark., has
returned to the Gallatin for the sum
mer.
Albert Schlechten, Thomas Quinn,
Guy Henderson and Alverd Corbly
have returned from Butte, where they
took part in the state bowling tourna
ment.
Mr. and Mrs. George Axtell were
visitors in Bozeman Saturday from
their ranch near Springhill. The roads
were so bad they came in on the "Tur
key Red" special.
FOR SALE
One trio of purebred Rouen ducks
H. P. Griffin, Courier Office.
Mrs. J. E. Armstrong went to Liv
ingston Tuesday to visit with her
mother, Mrs. George R. Nichols, who
is recovering from a surgical opera
tion in a Livingston hospital,
Mr. and Mrs. Joïm Berlinger are
the parents of à son, born March 16
a t the Deaconess hospital. Mr- Berg
linger is a vocational student at the
college and gets his school of agri
culture diploma this week.
Mrs. Jack W r hite has returned home
after spending four months in Cali
fornia. She stopped at Long Beach,
Pasadena and other points and re
turned
change in climate.
greatly
benefited by the
a verdict was returned in favor of
Kiefer for the fur. amount claimed,
$578.
In the case of John Kiefer against
R. A. Hunter in the district court
Mrs. J. N. Kelly served a surprise
cn her husband on the occasion of his
■ vcnty-seventh birthday last Sat
urday when .she arranged a big fami
lv birthday dinner for his benefit. Mr.
Kelly received the hearty congratu
lations of his family and numerous
I friends.
Mrs. M. H. Spain has returned to
! Bczcman after spending a few weeks
1 vicitin B her son Marvin Spain at
! Rounup and her eldest son Whitfield
s P ain at ranch near Pass Creek,
I Mrs * s P ai n is with her daughter, Mrs,
Walter Davis and family.
yW^WAWAW/AW.VAV.V.V.VW.VMWV.V.VWW^
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTISTS, Bozeman, Montana
Announces a Free Lecture on
' CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
in the
MUNICIPAL THEATRE
THURSDAY EVENING. MARCH TWENTY- FOURTH
by
CHARLES W. CHADWICK, C. S. B. *
of Omaha, Nebraska
Member of the Board of Lectureship of the Mother Church, the First
Church of Christ. Scientists, in Boston, Mass.
YOU AND YOUR FRIENDS ARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO
ATTEND. LECTURE BEGINS PROMPTLY AT 8:30
Ray Pitts, former captain for the
Bobcat basketball team, who has been
attending Leland Stanford university
at Palo Alto, Cal-, has returned home
and will assist his father on their
ranch near Elk Creek during the sum
mermonths
Mr. and rMs. J. E. Murphy, former
residents here, have veturncd form
Bilings, where they have made their
home for some time. Their daught
er, Miss Lala Murphy has entered
the senior class at the high school.
Frank Hoey, Jr., and Miss Hermina
Henke, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G.
W. Henke, will be married in Helena
today. The young couple expect
to be back
of the wet':. Mi
j emplqyed by the local telephone com
pany.
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M. B. Huffman, one of the pioneers
of the valley, celebrated his eighty
thrid birthday at his home on North
Tracy last week. Mr. Huffman came
across the plains in '64 and farmed in
the valley until some 10 years ago.
j A birthday cake and appropriate pro
| gram featured the day.
Mrs. George D. Pease left last we dc
j for an extended trip to California.
, JS . S ..P*„ . ,
where she will visit with friends and
j relatives. Her daughter.Miss Muriel
, graduates from Stanford in Jv. le and
j Mrs. Pease expect to remain south
[ until that time. Mr. Pease accompan
ied him wife as far as Butte.

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