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The Bozeman courier. (Bozeman, Mont.) 1919-1954, April 20, 1921, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075113/1921-04-20/ed-1/seq-4/

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THE BOZEMAN COURIER
PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON
By REPUBLICAN COURIER CO. Inc.
Established 1871
IN THE FAMOUS GALLATIN VALLEY
H. P. GRIFFIN
Editor
SUBSCRIPTION IN ADVANCE
$ 2.00
$ 1.00
One Year ....
Six Months .
Three Months
Single Copies
.60
.05
Entered in the Postoffice at Bozeman, Montana, as Second Class Matter
GET DOWN OR WAIT.
The International Harvester company's re
duction of 10 per cent in the price of steel made
machinery which it hopes to sell next year is a
joke. Wheat has dropped from $3 to $1 and com
from $1.50 to 40 cents. The farmer who must sell
at one-third of his war price will not rush to mar
ket for new machinery at 90 per cent of the war
Manufacturers and builders might as well
face the situation as it is. When our department
of labor at Washington reports the average cost
of living down 3 per cent the construction trades,
for instance, cannot stimulate building by a cut
prices.
of only 10 per cent in their wages. People simply
will not build until costs come down some more.
It will be so with farm machinery. Farmers
will not buy until the price breaks again and
again. It is true that manufacturing costs have
not come down very much hence the harvester
trust can't reduce the prices very much more
than it did. Its material is only slightly cheaper
and its labor cost has not come down very much
yet. Its profit of 13 per cent last year leaves only
a slight margin from which to cut prices out of
profits.
There must be a buyers' strike and starvation
of the market for farm machinery before its price
can get down to an equality with the value of the
dollar which the farmer receives for his goods.
The farmer being half of the people with a little
more than half of the buying power of our popu
lation his enforced wait for other prices to get
down to his prices is going to make slow business
for all lines that are not yet able to get down to
normal prices. Labor adjustments, which are al
ways difficult to negotiate, and hence are defer
red until necessity enforces them, must come
down before industry can find a buyer for its
wares.
'
Therein lies much of the trouble of the whole
scheme of things. The farmers represent half of
the population. Farm prices went back to nor
mal in a hurry. And farmers are going ahead
planting wheat and oats and barley this spring
the same as usual. Railroad wages, garment
worker wages, carpet weaver wages, wages with
out end among the strong unions of the country
are still at or near what they were at the peak
of high prices. It is not fair and the farmer for
one is not going to stand for it. He is putting off
buying things like machinery, making improve
ments on his ranch and everything else save the
purchase of food and clothing, just as long as he
can. In the line of food and clothing, prices are
• nearer normal than in other lines mentioned and
consequently farm business can be booked for an
increase as soon as there is money in the coun
try with which to buy.
Mr. Gary of the steel trust said that steel
would not come down, but it did, and it will come
down again before there will be much business
for the mills. The harvester trust defers its 10
per cent cut until next year, but it will have to
cut on this year's goods and cut more than 10
cent before there will be much business in
farm machinery.
per
THE PRISON WARDEN.
Governor Dixon has been severely criticised
by democratic and anti-administration papers for
dismissing Frank Conley from his post as warden
of the state penitentiary and putting Mr. Pot
ter in his place. These papers have made capital
of Frank Conley's personal popularity in their ef
forts to injure Governor Dixon.
Etc., of the Bozeman Courier, pub
iished weekly at Bozeman, Montana
required by the Act of August 24,
1912. ' '
Manager, T. H. Sears.
Editor, H. P. Griffin.
Owner, H. F. Sears, estate.
Known bondholders, mortgagees
and other security holders holding
1 per cent or more of total amount of
bonds mortgages or other securities
—None.
T. H. Sears, Manager.
Subscribed and sworn to before me
the 18th. day of April, A. D. 1921,
Geo. C. Davenport.
Notary Public for the State of Mon
tana, residing at Bozeman, Montna.
My Commission expires April 27,
1923.
Locals
Mrs. C. L. Stevens and three child
ren have returned ta the city and re
sumed their residence on South Grand
avenue.
Many of the college students went
for hikes on Sunday, most of them
spending the entire day in the moun
tains. Bridger canyon and Sour
Dough claimed a majority of the
walkers.
Parker Stone came in (from Us j
ranch near Belgrade to attend the j
Sigma Chi dance and spent the week
end here.
Mrs. J. A. Devine of Great Falls,
who has been visiting her sister-in
law, Mrs. O. E. Myers, left Thursday
morning for her home.
Hollis Holloway of Townsend, Bro
ther of Ray Holloway, came to Boze
man Saturday to attend the funeral
of John Work.
Sunday gave opportunity for many
Bozeman people to get to the moun
tains in their cars for the first time
this spring and apparently everyone
who had an auto used it.
Miss Grace Sackett, who has been
visiting her sister Nona Sacket at
the Phi Gamma house, left Sunday
with her father, A. N. Sackett for
their ranch in-the upper Madison.
P. M- Gross, well known Hereford
auctioneer of Kansas City spent
Tuesday in Bozeman visiting W. O.
Matthews and family. Mr. Gross was
on his way to Helena to cry the Mon
tana Hereford Breeders' association
sale, which will be held tomorrow.
XT, J »X A TJ 04. e-e A
Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Stafford are
spending the week in Helena attend
ing the stockmen's convention. Mr.
Stafford's brother. P. B. Stafford,
. , , '
president of the livestock exchange
cf Chicago, was one of the speakers
convention,
In asking for Mr. Conley's resignation Gov
ernor Dixon speaks no word of criticism. He
merely states that he must have a man in the
post who is in hearty sympathy with the admin
istration. And in this he is right. In the past
four years the state prison has cost the state in
the neighborhood of a million dollars. Presum
ably the next four years will see no reduction in
this expense, at least they would not under Mr.
Conley's management. In spending this vast sum
of money Governor Dixon must have a man who
is in full and hearty sympathy with him and his
policies, for Governor Dixon is the man respon
isible for it all.
|
The opposition papers likewise make capital !
| of the fact that Frank Conley is a republican,
With all due deference to Mr. Conley's republican
ism, it is not reasonable to suppose he could ever
have advocated it very strongly and still retain I
his office under Governor Stewart. Someway !
Governor Stewart was never very partial to those
who have strong republican leanings,
| justified in removing Mr, Conley, after over three
Governor Dixon is governor of this state. He
has the right to make his appointments as he
sees fit and apparently he is doing so. I? he felt
months of trial, he should not be censured until
his appointee has a chance to either make good or
f a jh
THE TRAILS OF THE EARTH.
Since the earliest days of history, back into
the time when history itself was mixed with leg
endary folk and our early forefathers traced their
kinship to the gods of Norse mythology, the An
glo-Saxon race has been the foremost to tread the
trails of the earth. From the ice-bound hills and
fjords of northern Europe they spread to the
milder dines of England and northern France,
thence to send their sons to new worlds. The
early settlers in our own country pushed ever in
the lead, seeking new homes nearer to the setting
sun. And there lies the secret of the Anglo-Saxon
race ; they traveled not for conquest alone, but for
homes. The new lands they found they more
than conquered, they tilled and cultivated and
developed. And when the time came for them to
take the last trail, that trail not marked on earth,
they left the land better than they found it.
We Americans nowadays can' find few new
trails to tread. There is no more unknown west.
We are living in a time when the last of the trail
blazers are leaving us one by one, but we can see,
as can no succeeding generation, the benefit of
their lives. Because we have lived with them,
known them, loved them, we have a better per
spective than those who come alter us, ana we can
fittingly do honor to whom honor is due.
In the passing of John Work, Bozeman lost a
solid and useful citizen, a good neighfor and i
a fine man. Those of us who knew him best will
keenly miss his familiar figure, his kindly face
and the kindly greeting he had for everyone.
But his death marks more than the passing of a
more
good citizen, it is the disappearance of a type of
which too few are left. Those early pioneers,
the men who guided this state through all the
travails of its infancy, whose far-sighted accomp
lishments made Montana what it is today; their
like will not be seen again. They were a credit,
not only to their state and nation, but to the An
glo-Saxon race from which they sprung. They
trod the trails of the earth,, nor hesitated because
they found the going difficult or dangerous.
We gather together to do their memories,
what small honor we may, but the real reward is
not within our giving. It comes to men who Hved
as John Work lived, to see the wilderness a gar
den, the barren prairie a valley of farms and
homes, the old time camping ground a beautiful,
modern city, and to know that these things came
as the work of their hands; it comes to men who
died as John Work died, surrounded by their loved
ones and content that life had given as it had, of
competence, happiness and honor. %
The regular meeting of the Boze
man Rotary club will take place this
evening in the form of a banquet. At
this meeting the officers and direc
tors for the coming year are elected.
Jerome Williams, editor of the Big
Timber Pioneer, who was in the city
Saturday to attend the funeral of
John Work, made a pleasant call at
the Courier office,
buried his own mother, Mr. Work'*»
sister, Friday afternoon in Livings
ton.
< ►
j
Mr. Williams
► OPEN NOSTRILS! END ;;
A COLD OR CATARRH ;;
1
How To Get Relief When Head i [
, and Nose are Staffed Up. j ,
Count fifty! Your cold in head or
catarrh disappears. Your clogged nos
trils will open, the air passages of your
head will clear and you cau breathe
freely. No more snuffling, hawking,
mucous discharge, dryness or headache;
no struggling for breath at night.
Bma ^ ^y' 8 Cream
Balm from your druggist and apply *
jj^tle of this fragrant antiseptic cream
in your nostrils. It penetrates through
«very air passage of the head, soothing
ani heali "* *5° BW ° n ? n 01
mucous membrane, giving you matant
Head colds and catarrh yield
like magic. Don't stay stuffed-uo mà
miserable. Belief is ear«.
ODD FELLOWS AND REBEKAHS
PLAN ANNIVERSARY MEETING
Plans for celebrating the one hun
dred and second anniversary of the
Odd Fellows lodge are being formed
by committees from the local Odd
Fellow and Rebekah lodges, the cele
bration to take place on April 29 in
Bozeman. All the other Odd Fellow
and Rebekah lodges in the county will
be guests of the Bozeman lodges at
this meeting. The meeting will take
■Hi
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irs
Springtime
Clean-up
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WIPE OUT THE DUST AND DIRT ACCUMULATIONS OF
YEARS WITH A NEW COAT OF PAINT. GIVE NATURE—
YOUR LAWN, TREES AND FLOWERS—AN EVEN BREAK
DO YOUR PART WITH PAINT.
f A
SKILLED WORKMANSHIP IN INTERIOR DECORATION.
3 THE BEST STOCK OF WALL PAPER IN THE CITY. WE DO
I OUR WORK TO PLEASE YOÜ.
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Dixon & Dodson
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Phone 120-J.
130 West Main
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aaan h'M wti
SS3=
i.
Knicker and Long
for Boys and Young Men at
the New Lower Prices
i mmers
WOOLWEAR AND WAMAKIN SUITS FOR BOYS; CLASS
MATE FOR YOUNG MEN, IN CASSIMERE, TWEEDS AND
SCOTCH MIXTURES, IN BROWN, GREEN AND BLUE HEATH
ER MIXTURES; ALSO NAVY SERGES.
re
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1
1

Young men's long trouser suits
in form fitting, double breasted
models at $25 to $32.50.
Knicker Suits, for ages 6 to 17, at
$10, $12, $15 and $18.75.
> •
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y
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LITTLE CHAPS' TOP COATS
Marked down; sizes 2 to 6 years;
$12.50 shepherd check coats for
$8.00. $15.00 Navy serve coats
for $10J)0.
BOYS' SHOES
Brown and black*, new low
price on every pair in the house
—$3.95, $4.50, $7.50.
x
I
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O
BOYS' CAPS
Big choice; all snappy new
patterns in the new shapes ; 75c,
$1.00 to $1.50.
EXTRA KNICKERS
In cassimere and corduroy for
ages 6 to 17 years at $3.00 to $4.50.
KUPPENHEÎMER AND ARTCRAFT
* CLOTHES
For men and young men—$19.75, $29.75,
$47.50. > %
DEPENDABLE LUGGAGE
The finest and most complete line we've
ever shown. - Trunks, suitcases, overnight j,
cases and bags, Gladstone bags, portfolios,
etc., of fibre and solid leather in black and
tan—a brand new line, just unpacked.
o
MEN'S GLOBE UNION SUITS
All weights, $1.75 to $2.50
BOYS KAYNEE BLOUSES AND SHIRTS
BOYS' SPRING UNDERWEAR
Short sleeve and knee length style for
ages 4 to 16 years in ecru and white ; both
knitted and barred nainsook materials.
Prices at 75c to $1.50.
Patterns and colors that are guaranteed
to launder and wear without, fading—a
to replace any one that does not
hold up to this guarantee.
Madras, percale and chambray in the
stylish stripes and plain colors of
1
new one
a
new
blues, grays and khaki.
SILK AND KNITTED TIES
Four-in-hand and Windsors, 50c
Blouses $1.25, Shirts $1.50
I @MBERS-FÎSHER& I
1 "W' -ALWAYS RELIABLE;— 1
ft:
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the place of the regular bi-monthly
meeting of the county lodges, and as
this is Bozeman's turn, the meeting
wil be held here. Committees have
been appointed by both the Odd Fel
lows and the Rebekahs and one of
the largest and best meetings of the
year is expected. An effort is being
made to have State Grand Master W.
D. Bennet of Anaconda and State
Assembly President Trena Ross of
Great Falls present at the meeting
and visitors are being invited from
other lodges ir the state.
Twin babies, a boy and a gril, were
bom to Mr. and Mrs. R. B. Bowden
at their home on South Third avenue
on April 17. Mrs. Bowden and the
babies are reported as doing very
nicely. One youngster weighed 4 1-2
and t v a other 4 3-4 pounds. The boy
named John Child and the girl
was
Mary Joan.
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