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The Bozeman courier. (Bozeman, Mont.) 1919-1954, April 27, 1921, Image 2

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075113/1921-04-27/ed-1/seq-2/

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MONTANA NEWS
RETURNS TO FIND
HER HOME STOLEN
Harlem—It seems to be quite a
common thing in this vicinity to have
horses, cattle and saddles stolen, but
some time during the winter Miss
Nellie Holt's house was stolen from
her claim near here.
removed and nobody can give and in
formation regarding its disappearance
Nobody in the neighborhood ques
tioned knew that the house had been
After a diligent search Miss Holt has
failed to find any clue as to the
whereabouts of her heme. There is
not a tva~e of the building with the
exception of a rectangular plot of
withered grass where the house once
stood.
Miss HoU filed on a piece of land
last fall v hich was formerly held by
her sister. At that time it had a very
nice little house on in and she had
visions of Txing up a very comfor
table heme there this spring. But
when she t turned the fore part of
the week to take up Tier residence in
her home th re was none to be found.
MONTANA OIL MEN 1 IN
PUBLICITY CAMPAIGN
Lewistowu- -The Mont »na Oil Men's
issodatipn,.* state orgai aization, after
largely attended dinm x at the Fer
y'.iS hotel her* and an ex ecutive meet
^ as * n >ffh.t. has laun shed what is
by th* présider vit as "what
W1 * have been the clean est publicity
campaign ever initiated ; cn this coun
tr .v in connection
mem of an industry.
P \ l " licit .v matter consist ing of news
th >T *A 1 ^ fields, huit upon
e development and dis* :o varies of
with the develop
e day, will be .forwarded to papers,
0 OI association^ to oil c< >rporations
and to «clubs and individual
.out the United States and
.most dç.Uy,
John M. McGreevy,
York newspaper coiiespon.
organizer and first manage
Western Canadian Industrial
ment
s through -
( Canada al
ity -N»'W
lent -and
r nf the
Dtwelop
ifted to
oat -the
recei
... as ;sociation, was appoi
outline the plans and carry
campaign. J
KEEP men GUESSING
^ A ' S MRS. M, S. HATH/
99
VWAV
Great Fa!l s _"Keep the men ,
IS the recipe for political
women given by Mrs.
r : r y ' State rc P reser, tative
Ravalli county and Democratic x
cader m the lower house of
»ness
mg,
»wer
tggie;
from
1
for
Mi
flooxf
last
pfir a w rC ' a telk to G.
rails vvomen s club.
"If the women want to keep
balance of power in party polit
they must keep the
where they stand,
way.
vote for the best
but if
neat
tee
c$
V
men guessb
" said Mrs. Hath
primaries an
men in your part
your party fails to select th
good men at the primary it is youx
fu.j to go to the general election
c uu elect the good men who
a
Go into the
nmg on the other ticket.
WOMAN HURLED UNDER
A DISC
1 : y sham—Becom ing frightened
unusually foud explosion of a
nearby tractor, a team hitched to a
disc and driven by Mrs. Joe Verse
hatie, ran away. Mrs. Versehatte
thrown under the disc and suffer
ed a broken
She went to the field
at
an
fVr.
1 c*b
arm.
early to as- !
■ lst lle r husband in prepaxing for beet
seeding at their farm
.... near Custer.
' v hen t}ie te& m she was driving came
a tractor in a neighboring field
she lost control of them.
iur left arm was broken in two
places, although there
of disc
are no marks
any other part of her body.
Dr. J. C. Hagen, of Hysham, attended
to the woman's injuries.
on
SHIRTS FOR SPRING
5
,r >
'T
J
- &
Distinctive Shirts for Par
ticular people.
Shirts for—
DRESS
WORK
SPORT
$32,000 TO BE PAID
MONTANA VETERANS
Miles City—As a result of the
cleanup drive in Montana made by
the "flying squadron" of officers of
the American Legion to connect the
ex-service men with the various
boards, bureaus and commissions es
tablished for their benefit by the gov
ernment, $32,000 will run monthly to
ex-service men of Montana as base
pay.
This was the statement of E. C.
Hardy, eligibility officer, with the
squad which has just completed its
work in this state and has disbanded
here. Other data given by Mr. Hardy
in connection with the work are; Dur
ing the month about 1,500 men ap
peared before the squad for various
claims.
BILLINGS FARMERS VOTE
DOWN DRAINAGE DISTRICT
Billings—Because, they said, farm
ers could not tolerate additional tax
imposed with products at present
prices 100 farmers gathered here Sat
urday and voted almost unanimously
against the creation of a 20,000 acre
drainage district west of the city un
der a law passed by the recent leg
islature. This law provides for the
issuance of bonds and the appoint
ment of commissioners.
EASTERN CAPITALISTS
IN WINNETT REGION
Winnett—A deal involving $30,000
is reported to have been entered into
between Walter Brahs, a local resi
dent and an Eastern capitalist, hav
ing two 40-acre tracts of land as the
other consideration. The one tract
is located in section 25-17-26 and is
valuable from the fact that it is held
as being very likely oil land as is al
so the other forty located in section
3-13-27.
option to buy but it is likely that it
will be closed in a few days.
The deal so far is but an
ONLY ONE PINT IN 10 DAYS
ALLOWED
Here is an explanation of the fa
mous Siegfriedt law, permitting phy
sicians under certain conditions to
prescribe red liquor for sick patients.
If anyone has an idea that it will be

easy to get a drink under this new
aw they are sadly mistaken,
Physicians who have filed applica
tion on form 14004, and obtained per
mits to prescribe intoxicating liquor
as provided in article 3, may pres
cribe distilled spirits, wines or such
alcholic.'medical preparations fit for
use for beverages as authorized to be
; manufactured by section 60, for pen
's ou s upon whom they are in atten
dance, if aftm- careful physical
amination of such persons, or in cases
..where such examination is impracti
cal)'e, upon the best information ob
tainable, tb« physician believes that
tb< internal or external use of such
V
a
à
ex
i:
1
Uquor as
a melicine by such persons
s.uc cessary, and will afford relief to
from . Æop e known ailment,
hyfciuians who.ic'o not hold permits
*®hv\e may nclt issue prescriptions
'-'intoxicating' öyuor.
k» prescription _ may be issued for
»fcater quanity of intoxicating li
Ithan '
j
t
P
as
samt person-, by efcz> orl
physician b. ^Furtht» Wneit'
*«- liquor is .«being adimais-J
J " "*«"
ecrenate .»uactity so admin
fox
I
a g
quor
médit
scribt
mere
spirltu
tered ti
er phya
71, the i
xs nece« ary for UBe MS a
the person for whom nre
tL ft?' the
the qumt ty prescribed
person me y not excetl
àHhin any
istered s
for any s
one pint x
days. Phj
to write pi
their own i
procured upc
Intoxicating .
for medicinal purposes by* tfee person
for whom pres ^hed and uaaf not be
sold or otherwi. ^ disposed of.
Period of » tjp
S* iats are> net permittee
fcS)fi)itions Jo? liquor for
or to nasj.any liquor I
b .proFcripliioifc- by them
tynor may only be used
The law also
prescription may
prescribes . tbit
V filled more than
no
provided free by ^ govex *«*ent.
These blanks are ni »'bered an«| btth
the physician and the store rauyt
keep a record alphabe ^ iajly arra uged
of eveiy prescription i ^ ihtoxicating i
liquor issued by him, the date, the»
kmd, name of the patiex. % purpose orl
ailment and directions fc » use there-(
including the amoun t a®d fre
quency of the dose."
once and must be
«bxde out on: blanks
of,
Retail phannacists
naay sell liquors on prescrip tion not
truggjfits
or %
to exceed on® pint of spiritx Vms lt
quors at one time. They shoi tld re
•fuse to fill any prescription t'oi* li
quor if they have reason to b«.4icve
that physicians are prescribing -for
other than medical purposes and .'lot
to exceed one pint in 10 aays. The
druggists must report to tha
ment a complete report of sale»- The
druggists must pay special tax C* 8 li
quor dealers under the internal t* 9V -
enue law?.
1 hysicians can obtain not more than *
goverxx
six quarts of liquor during any calen
dar year to be administered to their
patients only in the quantities neces
sary to afford relief at the time of
administering and may not sell or
furnish the same to such persons or
to any other persons.
PECULIAR CASE UP
IN DISTRICT COURT
One of the most peculiar cases that
has been heard before the district
court in some time was heard before
Judge Law Thursday and was continu
ed over until May 5, when the argu
ments will be heard. The case in
question is the suit of the Peck-Hills
Furniture company of Minneapolis
against the Farmers' State bank of
Wilsall,
The furniture company is suing the
bank for payment of $1,496 with in
terest since May, 1917, the amount
being the sum due them on a $2,000
bill of furniture sold in April 1917 to
F. Landis, proprietor of the Wilsall
hotel at that time. When Landis pur
chased the furniture he made a pay
ment of $500. Mr- E. T. Gruell, who
was president of the bank at that
time wrote the Peck-Hills company
stating that the bank was behind
Landis and would see that the furni
ture company received its money, and
on the strength of this letter the fuxi
ture was shipped. On May 29 Landis
died and the hotel property became
pai't of his estate, which was found
to be insolvent. The next year Gruell
sold his interests in the bank and re
moved to Portland, Oregon.
At the hearing yesterday Sam
Working, one of the bank directors,
took the stand and stated that Mr.
Gruell never brought the Landis mat
ter before the directors and that the
bank never received any benefit from
the transaction; that Gruell had no
authority to commit the bank. On
the other hand the conmpany claims
that the letter they hold from the
president of the bank is equivalent to
elgal assurance that they will get
their money. Walter Hartman is ap
pearing for the plaintiffs and Miller
and O'Connor of Livingston for the
Wilsall bank.
Frank J. Robertson,
Lew Green and J. K. Liquin, directors
of the bank were also present at the
hearing but did not take the stand.
McCORMICK GETS ON
IMPORTANT COMMITTEES
Washington, D. C., April 26th.—As.
signment to more committees than
any other new members of congress
is the honor that has been bestowed
upon Washington L. McCormick, rep
resentative from the first district of
Montana. First appointed to the Co
mittee on Committees, he took an im
portant part in selecting the person
nel of all the committees that will
guide the house in disposing of the
legislation to come before the Sixty
seventh session.
In addition to this importantcommit
tee, Mr. McCormick has been appoint
ed to the Committee on Public Lands,
Indian Affairs and Expenditures in
the department of justice. The first
two assignments are particularly ap
propriate in that Montana comprises
an important part in their jurisdic
tion. The assignment to the Commit
tee on Expenditures in the department
of justice is an honor which is gen
erally conferred upon veteran mem
bers.
FORMER GALLATIN MAN
• DIES IN IDAHO FALLS
Samuel P. Robinson, a former rest
dent of the Gallatin valley, died at
his home in Idaho Falls, Idaho
Friday, April 22, following an illness
of some three months duration.
Robinson's body reached Bozeman
a " d funeral services were held in the
eSt clïapel Tues day afternoon, in
the Bozeman cem_
on
Mr.
jVIr ' Robinson was a native of Ten
ne ssee and lived in the valley for
sev vrai years. He was married in
191a* to iMss I Y a Littleton of Bel
grade- -and his wife and
one son,
( Frank * seven years old, sur-vive him.
j ^ wo t fathers, J. C- Robinson of Idaho
' n d Horace Robinson of Salt
I kake b antl one sister, Mrs. C.
Bon ' °* B° zeman » also survive
Wm * ** was with her broth -
when h o flîied .and with Mrs. Robin
50/1 and . ber ^on, accompanied the
body back t * Bozeman.
f OR SALE
rates, also
-Betting eggs, reduced
Line prize B. C. R. I.
also
Red Cock.
Fbone 401-R
WANTED To RENT—^ lK -nitured
modeni home, s «3rinning '
June. No childi w - Reply i^ca "
Courier Office.
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*
ALL RUGS REDUCED
In Price At D. D. Smith's
The manufacturers of RUGS and CARPETS have just announced
reduced prices of about 25 per cent from the reduced prices quoted last
December and we have immediately reduced our retail prices to correspond.
We believe the lowest prices on rugs have been reached for many months
to come, for it is generally known that if the new tariff bill, which places a
tax on carpet wools, is passed (as many manufacturers believe it will be),
the cost of rugs and carpenis will be increased. ..Therefore we recommend
. that you buy now while prices are at the bottom and while our selection
is at its best.
Below we list new reduced prices on dependable qualities.
9 x 12 RUGS
Last Year's Price
.$ 16.00.
. 22.50.
. 27.50.
,. 27.50
.. 60.00
. 70.00.
. 152.50.
. 195.00
Today's Price
.$ 11.50
. 18.00
. 20.00
. 21.50
. 51.00
.53.95
. 105.00
. 125.00
MAUSCO GRASS RUGS .
DELTOX GRASS RUGS .
KOBE JUTE RUGS.
TREMONT WOOL and FIBER
KLEARFLAX LINEN .
SEAMLESS AXMINSTERS ...
HEAVY WEIGHT WILTONS .
IMPERIAL SAROUK .'..
8-3 x 10-6 RUGS
DELTOX GRASS .:
KOBE JUTE .
TREMONT WOOL and FIBER
KLEARFLAX LINEN .
KASHGAR WILTONS .
HERATI WILTONS .
.$ 20.00.
25.00.
. 25.00
...56.00.
145.00.
185.00.
$ 16.00
19.00
. 20.00
47.25
95.00
115.00
BEAUTIFUL ORIENTAL RUGS
World's most renowned reproduction of ORIENTAL rugs. Woven in one
piece
Size 4x7 ..
Size 3-6 x 5-6
Size 2-5 x 4-6
$ 55.00
. 45.00
. 25.00
$ 40.00
30.00
. 18.75
Dependable qualities in the smaller sixes of
WILTONS, AXMINSTER, KLEARFLAX, GRASS AND RAG RUGS
W ilton Rugs
Last Year's Price
.$ 18.00
. 25.00
Today's Price
.$ 12.50
. 16.50
Size 27 x 54
Size 36 x 63
Axminster Rugs
Sixe 18 x 36 ........
Size 27 x 54 .
Size 36 x 72 .
$ 4.50.:.
$ 2.65
9.50
6.00
17.50
10.00
Klearflax Linen Rugs
Size 27 x 54 ..
I 5.50
$ 4.00
Deltox Grass Rugs
Size 27 x 54 .
Size 30 x 60 ..
Size 36 x 72 .
$ 2.75
2.oo
4.00
3.00
4.50
3.50
Rag Rugs
Size 24 x 36
Size 36 x 72
$ 2.25
$ 1.35
$ 5.40
3.25
Chenille Bath Rugs
Size 24 x 36....
Size 24 x 48 .
$ 5.00
$ 3.25
6.00
3.85
Wilton and Velvet Hall Runners in all wanted sizes
lust a few short lengths of Armstrong Linoleum at
6 x 9 Armstrong Linoleum rugs, were $15 ; priced to sell at
* . -
.One-third Off
Half Price
.$9.50
NOW AND SAVE
w.
I).
7,16 Ho W
6 ° f the Hoog;
1er
Kitch
I*

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