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The Bozeman courier. (Bozeman, Mont.) 1919-1954, April 27, 1921, Image 3

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075113/1921-04-27/ed-1/seq-3/

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Local Comment
All last week the valley was busy.
In every field four horses hitched
abreast tilled mellow, sweet smelling
earth. Here and there a small tractor
did its part in preparing the soil for
the coming crop. Men were every
where working. But the significant
part of the whole farming scheme
was that the women were working
too- Not working around the houses,
not making garden or tending to the
chickens, but actually working in the
-field with their husbands. There is
something big, something grand
about the sight of these country wo
men of the Gallatin who have the
strength and the courage to help their
husbands put in the crop. It is some
thing so far removed from the froth
of life, from short skirts, silk stock
ings and peek-a-boo waists, from
"affinities" and constant bridge part
ies, that a person wonders if the two
belong to the same species. North of
the Belgrade road there is a little
woman with three children, the baby
less than a year old. A nine year
old boy takes care of the other two
youngsters ■while the little mother
runs a tractor. In the next field the
father is driving his team. In other
fields of the valley women can be
seen running disks and harrows, doing
their part, yes more than their part,
to help their husbands make good. We
read tales of pioneer women and their
trials, legend tells of wonderful wo
men in history, but right here in the
Gallatin valley we are face to face
with the same thing. We judge slow.
ly, some of us, confusing values and
grudging honor to whom honor is
due, but we can all pause to do honor,
to think with respect and perhaps
with envy, of these wonderful women
on Gallatin valley farms.
Have you noticed the trend of move
ment in this country. It is worth a
thought or two. Booze is down and
out, officially, though fighting for a
chance to stand again. Tobacco is
an increasingly popular target for
the crusaders, who are determined
that it shall follow booze. Some or
ganizations deny this, but their ac
tive operations belie their words,
Motor cars are flattening out the
churches to such an extent that it is
difficult to obtain an old time Sunday
congregation on a Sunday morning,
Only three count of the many, but
they tell the velocity of the wind and
the way it blows- *
There are those, apparently, who
are ti'ying to make the pool hall an
issue of the new city administration.
Just how' far they can go, whether
or not any chance will come, is too
early to predict. A resort where men
gather to play pool and billiards can
be as respectable as a church or as
tough as blazes. It all depends on
the character of the proprietor and
the regulations prescribed by the city
government. If the proprietor in
sists on good order in his place of
business, then the city authorities
will never be compelled to intervene.
If, on the other hand, the proprietor
of a pool hall or any other place of
business where men congregate for
recreation, is not insistent that his
patrons behave themselves, then he
is not fit to conduct the business and
his place should be closed. The mat
ter of Sunday closing is being more
or less discussed. The pool hall is
the poor man's club. There he meets
his friends, spends some of his leisure
time and gets a part of his enjoyment
of life. If pool halls are run as they
should be, and unless they are they
should not be run at all, there is no
valid reason why they should not be
open on a Sunday afternoon. The
farm hands come in from the country
on a Sunday. With the pool halls
closed they have no place to meet,
to talk, to play. The same is true
of the laboring man. The lodge mem
ber can go to his club rooms and
spend a pleasant afternoon. The
other fellow has no place but the
streets- It is not a fair break. Peo
,ple are coming to look at this in a
more liberal manner in other places,
as witness to the fact that in Butte
the Y. M. C. A. is open in all its de
partments on Sunday, and is proud
of the fact. In a spirit of fairness to
all a bit more liberality in our own
town might not come amiss.
A good suggestion was put up at
the Rotary meeting last Wednesday
evening. There are many men in
Bozeman who have contributed much
to the local Y. M. C. A. It was sug
gested that these men pick out boys
who could not afford to join the "Y"
and make them the benificiaries of
their contributions. This would in
crease the membership of the "Y
and, what is of more importance, in
crease the good it can do in the com
munity. The "Y" should be the gath
ering place of all the youth of
Bozeman who cannot afford to be
long, and there are, the community
should see to it that they have a mem
bership card- That is what we built
the "Y" for and therein lies the great
est field of its work. Get these boys
interested in the institution from a
physical standpoint, get them using
the gymnasium and the swimming
pool and you have started them on
the road to better citizenship, for
there is nothing that makes for a
real man than the participation in
good, clean sport.
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$50.00 $40.00 $30.00
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SUIT SALE
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COMMENCING FRIDAY, APRIL 29TH, WE WILL OFFER OUR EN
TIRE LINE OF MEN'S AND YOUNG MEN'S HIGH GRADE SUITS AT
PRICES YOU CONNOT AFFORD TO MISS—JUST ABOUT HALF
PRICE. THESE SUITS ARE HART SCHAFFNER & MARX, FASHION
PARK, OXFORD HAND TAILORED AND SOCIETY BRAND. OUR SE
LECTION IS BY FAR THE LARGEST IN THE CITY, AND WE FEEL
SURE IF GIVEN A CHANCE WE CAN PLEASE YOU. COME EARLY
AND GET YOUR SELECTION WHILE THE STOCK IS COMPLETE.
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Suit Values to $100
NOW $50.00
Alteration Extra
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Suit Values to $80.00
NOW $40.00
Alteration Extra
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Suit Values to $60
NOW $30.00
Alteration Extra
Spring Top Coats
Values to $65
NOW $32.50
Spring Top Coats
Values to $45.00
NOW $22.50
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Just Think of ft—High Grade Suits as Low as
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WESTPHAL'S
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Quality Corner
Home of Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes
A BACHELOR'S PRAYER
Backward, turn backward, O Time in
your flight,
Give me a maiden with skirts not so
tight;
Give us a girl whose charms, many
or few,
Are not so exposed by much peek-a
bo.
Give us a maiden, no matter what
age,
Who won't use the street for a vau
deville stage; *
Give us a girl not so sharply in
view, 1
Dress her in skirt» that the sun won't
shine through. *
Then give us the dances of days long
gone by,
With plenty of clothes and steps not
so high;
Oust the turkey-trot capers and but
termilk glide,
The hurdy gurd twist and the wig
gle-tail slide.
Then let us feast our tired optics
once more
On a genuine woman as sweet as of
yore;
Yes, Time, please turn backward and
grant our request,
For God's richest blessing—but not
one half-dressed.
This is said to have been found
in a tennis court near St. John.
A MALE OBSERVER.
MARRIED THURSDAY
POPULAR COUPLE
On last Thursday afternoon M. J.
Blish and Mrs- Vera Buell Callaway,
two of Bozeman's most popular young
people, were married in the Cal
vary Presbyterian church in San
Francisco, California. The wedding
] the social life of Bozeman and is
took place at four o'clock in the after
noon and was attended only by a few
intimate friends of the couple. Mrs.
Walter Reeseman, a friend of the
bride and wife of Dr. Walter L. Reese
man, former Bozeman resident, was
bridesmade and Walter Powell, for
mer coach at the college, was best
man. Those present at the wedding
were all former Bozeman people. Fol
lowing the ceremony a wedding din
ner was servd at th St. Francis hotel.
After a short wedding trip to vari
ous parts of California Mr. and Mrs.
Blish will return to Bozeman and will
make their home in the Blackmore
during the summer months.
Mrs. Blish is a daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. H. S. Buell and has lived in
Bozeman for the past fifteéh years.
She has taken a prominent part in
well known and very popular here.
For the past two years she has work
ed in the ofice of the county treasurer
and for two months this spring was
deputy county treasurer.
Mr. Blish or "Tony" as he is bet
ter known, is assistant chemist at
the experiment station and is well
liked by both students and faculty of
the local institution. Last spring he
was of material assistance to Coach
Powell in coaching the baseball team.
He is well known in musical circles
through his mastery of the violin. -Mr.
Blish graduated at the University of
Nebraska and is a member of-the
Phi Gamma Delta fraternity.
ROTARY CLUB IN
ANNUAL MEETING
The Bozeman Rotary club held its
annual meeting at the Bozeman hotel
last Wednesday evening and -elected
directors for the coming year. The
five men elected were John Lovelace,
J. R. Chambers, J. M- Hamilton, Fred
F. Willson and Rev. R. P. Smith,
Fred West gave the talk of the
evening, taking up his own profession
of undertaking, telling of the origin
of the profession and the different
steps it has passed through to the
present day. Although the subject
was rather an unusual one, Mr. West
handled it in a most interesting man
ner.
Following Mr. West's talk the elec
tion was held. Votes of appreciation
for the work of the retiring board of
directors were taken and the man
agement of the Bozeman hotel was
also warmly thanked for their cour
tesy to the club and the excellent
meals they have been serving.
The new board of directors met
with the retiring board at the Tea
Cup Inn Monday evening and elected
their officers for the coming year
John Lovelace was chosen president
of the club with J. R. Chambers vice
persident and Roy M. Keister secre
tary. The president and vice presi
dent were chosen from among the
directors and the secretary selected
from the body of the club. The re
tiring board consisted of Alfred At
iknson, A. C. Roecher, H. H. Howard,
Chas. Vandenhook and C. W. Sweet.
is
in
TILLERY FARM HOME
DESTROYED BY FIRE
The ranch home of Thomas L. Till
ery near Josephine was completely
destroyed by fire last Friday and the
house and its contents were a total
loss. Mr. Tillery was away from
home when the fir- occurred and has
no idea how it started. While the
ranch house was not particularly a
commodious one it has been Mr. Till
ery's home for many years. The
house, furniture and all Mr. Tillery's
clothing with the exception of the
su it he had on were completely de
stroyed.
FARMERS FRAME
RELIEF PROGRAM
Bureau Opposes Sales Tax and Re
peal of Excell Profits Tax—
Seek Lower Rail Rates
Washington, April 25—Repeal of
the guaranty section of the transpor
tation act, reduction in rates, equal
protection for agriculture under the
tariff, and adequate credit facilities
for agriculture is announced as the
executive program which the Ameri
can Farm Bureau Federation will rec
ommend to congress as an aid to
farmers. The program was formulated
by the executive committee of the
federation after a two weeks' confer
ence here.
Strong opposition was expressed to
any sales tax, to repeal of the excess
profits tax, and to any tariff on lum
ber and fertilizer. Another recom
mendation proposed the submission of
a constitutional amendment prohibit
ing the issuing of all tax free securi
ties as "more than $16,000,000,000 in
securities now escape federal tax.
The federation reaffirmed its stand
for packer regulation vested in the
department of agriculture and op
position to any federal excise tax on
land,
The attention of congress was call
ed to the "important and differing
factors affecting food products from
the American farm in their relation
ship to imports of like products from
foreign countries, in considering the
labor cost in making up the tariff
law. Attention of congress also was
directed to the "center" of food pro
duction of the United States as being
"somewhere" in the Mississippi val
ley while the center of consumption is
in the populas areas of the East
"many hundreds of miles away.
Ocean freight rates from competing
countries to the consuming centers
were declared to be lower "than are
the exorbitant and increasing freight
rates from our farms to our own
M
consumers
After setting forth that "recent ex
periences" have shown that the farm
ers are not "adequately financed" and
that their welfare is jeopardized when
they avail themselves of the present
short time commercial credits, the
federation recommended legislation to
provide proper authority for commo
dity and cattle financing and for per
sonal rural credits secured by proper
insurance features. It also asked that
profits from the federal reserve banks
be used as a revolving fund to pro
vide working capital during the in
terim between requests for money
and the sales of the debentures.
Recommendation was made that
such debentures be made eligible for
sale in federal reserve banks or on
the open market. Increase of the
maximum amount which may be loan,
ed to a single borrower from the fed
AUCTION SALE
AT MORGAN HITCHBARN, BOZEMAN
SATURDAY, APRIL 30
1 P.M.
Two good young saddle horses.
One sorrel, four years old, weight 1250.
One black mare, six years old, weight 1200.
Two good cows, one three-year-old white face.
. One good two-horse Galloway manure spreader.
One set new Ellis & Brandley harness.
Lot of collars, one single harness, two good bicycles,.
Three dozen chickens (White Leghorn and R. I. Red).
Twenty sacks potatoes (10 sacks pedigreed Green Mountain
seed), vegetables.
Work bench and lot of carpenter tools; also small tools, etc.
Household Goods
Practically two complete outfits of household furniture, in
cluding dressers, heating stoves, barrell churn, hand and water
power washing machines, good Monarch range, dining tables, and
chairs. Several double and single beds, springs and mattresses;
good sanitary couch, refrigerator, book case, two lawn
garden tools, and large list of other household goods too
ous to mention.
mowers,
numer
TERMS:—Cash, except livestock ,and liberal terms will be
given on them.
Consigned to:
l
TOM GILKERSON, Auctioneer.
A YERGEY, Clerk,
j oral banks from $10,000 to $25,000
was suggested,
A- A. Braten, who has been ill with
la grippe for several days at his home
in the Blackmore, is again able to be
about.
home on South Third avenue for sev
eral days but is now impriving.
Prof. Edmund Burke, experiment
station chemist, has been ill at his

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