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The Bozeman courier. (Bozeman, Mont.) 1919-1954, July 06, 1921, Image 4

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THE BOZEMAN COURIER
•j®
PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON
By REPUBLICAN COURIER CO. Inc.
Established 1871
IN THE FAMOUS GALLATIN VALLEY
Editor
H. P. GRIFFIN.
SUBSCRIPTION IN ADVANCE
$2.00
$ 1.06
One Year ....
Six Months .
Three Months
Single Copies
Ent« red in the Postoffic« at Bozeman. Montana, as Second Class Matter
ROSE AND HER KASHA BOWL
Rose Pastor Stokes, in a recent issue of the
so-called "Liberator," breaks out, like Mr. Wegg,
In the course of tjie "poenC she
into poetry.
wails "O, Russian proletariat, my comrades! How
I long to share your meagre bowl of Kasha.
Some longing, we'll say, some longing, kid.
Whatever kasha is. The suspicion is that kasha
has a kick to it. That being the case the longing
for it isn't confined to Rose and ke"
bring five a pint when slipped to the "longer,
right hexe in the U. S. A. where moonshine finds
a ready market,
of Rose's alleged longings.
• y
a would
v
That would be one explanation
But it is possible that Rose is mistaken about
the longing? Maybe she has something the
She mistakes the symptoms. If she
matter with her like indigestion or unrequited
love, lack of occupation or something. It will be
recalled by those who read Carlyle that he once
thought he had religion and later discovered that
it was stomach trouble.
The chances are that Rose needs exercise.
She isn't really longing to share the lot of lier
comrades.
got up in the morning and got breakfast for one
of the American proletariat who must be on hand
with the seven o'clock whistle, dressed three
yy
* 4
school time, did the dishes and cleared up the
sitting room and then got out last year's dresses
to see how much of the organdie she could use on
a summer gown, ordered her groceries, gave the
children their lunch at noon and went down to
children and washed their necks and ears before
the meeting of the ladies' aid from two to four,
lust so my boy with the rules of the long
supper ready at 6:30, sat on the porch a while
after supper and then went to bed before 10 like
a human and one of the great American people,
she'd feel different about the comradeship and
prefer an ice cream cone to a bowl of kasha, what
ever that Russian mess may be. There's nothing
like two or three young ones and a home to keep
up without a hired girl to hold the mind off that
longing" to be in Russia raising hell with an
obscene mob of mixed ignorance and intelligent
viciousness.
Bowl of kasha
nothing. Those bowls ofi
kasha sound fine with an ocean between them
and the morning grape-fruit, cereal and the rest
of a good breakfast, a breakfast by the way pro
vided to such parlor levines and trotskys as Rose
u
by the laws of an enlightened freedom. It would
be interesting to follow Rose after she had her
check for the poem and w r atch her spend the
money. Don't you believe for an instant that she
ordered a bowl of kasha or bought cotton sox.
There are a lot of Roses, male and female,
who "long" in this country. Most of them "long
for the luxuries of life without labor, for power
without responsibility, for wage without work.
Some of them are neurotics, some are fools, some
are lazy and some are keenly and sordidly vicious.
Hey, you American proletarian, what's your
order, kasha or roast beef with American fried
potatoes and a piece of pie? How's your "long
yy
mgs.
RULES OF THE ROAD
Road rules are the result of experience. They
are intended to establish safety and advance
traffic. The reason the traffic cop in the city
halts you are several. Your safety is involved.
Not only yours but that of hundreds of others.
If you run by you are or should be pinched and
fined. That's because a large number of persons
besides yourself have rights on the road.
Just so my boy yith the rules of the long
road you must travel until you wear out or go to
the junkpile through accident or misfortune.
Those rules of this long road haven't been made
in a minute. They have grown. They are the
result of experience. Most of them were born out
of calamity just as the road rules at the street
corners came about through injuries and deaths
and destruction, of property. Every one of those
rules of conduct, road rules of life, was paid for
by bitter experience. The moral rules are guide
posts showing the best and safest route.
Drive by the signs, kid, drive by the signs.
Observe the rules of the road. Obey the signals
of the man in front.
Traffic experience has been a thousand gener
Signal the one behind,
îrcion» working out those traffic rules on the big|^
highway,
mZZ may think it is up to you to "show
speed." Nothing to it. The only applause you
will get is from thé scorcher. The general traffic
will remark, "That fool will kill himself or some
A
body else," "ought to be pinched." The worst of
it is that the general prediction comes true.
You'll find that you'll get farther on the
journey by observing the rules of the road.
You'll have more mileage and more friends.
You'll keep the repute of a sensible and law abid
ing citizen. ,
'
The fellow that insists on breaking the moral
road mica goes to the ditch. Sometimes folks are
sorry for him. Usually they forget him and
mention as they go by the place "That's where
Soandso went into the ditch." Kill him?" "No,
not quite, but left him a cripple." There are many
moral and business cripples crawling about be
cause they insisted on making their own road
rules.
Drive a decent gait. Watch the signs. Keep
an eye on the traffic signals. Remember this,
that when you wreck the car you are not the
only sufferer. Others suffer,
family dies under the wreckage.
The rules of the road have been growing
Sometimes the
since the first man. They are the essence of
human experience, the consensus of the common
sense and wisdom of 5,000 years. Stick to the
rules.
CANDIDATES FOR TROUBLE
In this connection it is not always the fault
of the one who breaks the traffic rules of life.
There's everything in the training to be a good
driver. A Courier representative was going home
the other night between the hours of 11 and 12
o'clock and he noticed several boys ranging in
years from 11 to 16 prowling around on the
streets. Now where were the parents of these
youngsters? More than likely at some so-called
social function," or maybe acting the part of
exhibit one at some lodge doing where tinsel and
braid gave them momentary authority. Now*
when these youngsters are hauled upon the car
pet as candidates for the reform school what will
i the parents do? No. boy or girl of the ages above
j mentioned, is safe roaming around the streets
towards midnight. If they are not looking for
trouble, trouble will be looking for them. There
u
will be a hint of suspicion that something is
wrong and probably everybody will hear it sooner
than the father and mother and will hear more
of it than the parents do when the parents finally
get wise. Parents who permit their offspring to
run the streets with no more restraint than if
they wore so many tom cats should h|ve a
| guardian placed over them. At night devils seek
j prey and the vast arm/ of men who go astray
must have their ranks recruited from some
source,
THE NEW GOVERNMENT
By a slight majority of the small vote cast
the citizens of Bozeman adopted the commission
manager form of government at the elections last
week. There will be more preliminary steps in
the election of three commissioners, but in the
course of due time the positions of the mayor
an d the council will be vacant and there will be
but the one head to the city's affairs,
For many years the Courier has been an ad
vocate of this measure. At a time when we were
opposed by the balance of the local press and
substantial majority of the citizens, the Courier
worked for this end. We believe it to be the
only sensible way of running a city and it is with
a great deal of interest that we watch the new
a
regime.
Bozeman is by no means unanimous in favor
of the change. That this is true is shown by the
closeness of the vote. There will be among those
who voted against the measure some who will
take pleasure in knocking every mistake made
under the new form. That mistakes will be made
there is no doubt.
But we are going to have a
city manager and we are going to give him, and
Bozeman as well, a square deal. That is the at
titude to take on the question,
mitted ourselves to the change. Let's
through, let's give it a square chance—if it don't
work we can always return to the old aldermanie
way of running civic affairs.
We have com
see it
We believe that the new form of
■ i. h h ■. government
will give the city a chance to get out of its pre
sent depressing financial difficulties. We hope
so, anyway. And to that end, when the
manager comes to Bozeman, let's all pitch in and
show him what community cooperation can do.
new
We've all got to ride in the same boat, let's each
takç our turn at the oars and see if we cannot
make Bozeman the model city of Montana, in
government and finances as well as in beauty.
We each of us count in making up this little
munity—we can put over this city manager busi
ness in good shape if we give it the right cooper
ation, or we may be able to knock it to death.
Let's work for the good of Bozeman. We have
the chance. Make the most of it.
com
We have reached the first of July and all's
well. Never have the crops looked better than
they do now, after the recent storm. True, the
winter wheat is lodged, but little appears to be
injured and the spring grain is wonderful; and
he seas °n has been ideal for pastures, meadows
*ànd for the newly sown grass. If a Montanan
wishes to look upon a pleasant landscape full of
the most abounding potentialities, he need not
leave the Gallatin.
The rain on Tuesday evening helped some»
only wf want more of it ; we will have to hàMe
more if the Crop carries out its early season prom
ise. The north end of the valley needs the rain
the most and there it got the least. It is a gen
eral rain, not local showers that we want, a good,
old fashioned soaker.
MONTANA CROPS
IN FINE SHAPE
(Continued from Page One)
on the range is smaller this year than
it has been for a number of years.
Haying is well along in practical
ly all of the counties of the state
where livestock is one of the big in
dustries. In Lewis and Clark, Mad
ison, Ravalli, Stillwater, Custer and
Yellowstone counties haying is well
under way and a heavy first cutting
of alfalfa is reported in each of these
counties. In Hill, Gallatin and Rose
bud counties a heavy growth of al
falfa is reported and haying is ex
pected to start this week. Prairie
county reports that recent rains have
improved range grass considerably.
Ravalli county made its first ship
ment of grass beef this week.
Custer, Fergus, Gallatin. and
Wheatland counties report that the
winter wheat is heading out and that
good crops are expected in these
grains. Chouteau reports that the
winter wheat crop is recovering from
the previous drouth, and in Yellow
stone county although the wheat is
iata they expect a good crop.
All counties report that the spring
crops are in excellent condition, es
pecially the spring wheat, in several
counties this wheat is starting to
head out. Big Horn is the lone coun
ty that reports crops are burning a
little in some localities. They add
that local showers have made grow
ing conditions much better.
Grasshoppers and other insect are
reported in portions of Gallatin, Big
Horn, Chouteau, Dawson, Hill Madi
son, Prairie, Teton, Valley and Yel
lowstone counties. The following
counties report that the crops have
been damaged by these insects: Daw
son, Chouteau, Hill, Prairie, Wheat
land, Valley, and Yellowstone.
xx xx xx xx
xx xx xx xx xx xx xx
♦♦
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n
DID YOU KNOW THAT— XX
xx
:: :: xx
♦♦
XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX XX
A certain dark haired lady, the
wife of a prosperous sheep man of
our valley, wears much beribboned
garters. She claims they are to keep
her hose from twisting, but she sits
in a position to show them—We won
der?
In some families we are returning
to the old custom of early engage
ments. Of course we're not sure, but
it is rumored that the young daugh
ter of a well known singer has given
her word. They keep the family mu
sical, too, for he's a "drummer."
Bozeman's young set are growing
Plenty.
of Organdie
Now
THE FINEST PERMANENT FINISH, SWISS QUALITY,
46-inches WIDE
$1.00 Yard
< •
WHITE, OLD ROSE, LEMON, NAVY, COPENHAGEN, HENNA,
FLAMINGO, WITH PINK ORCHID AND NILE
TO COME IN AT THE END OF
THE WEEK
/
A QUALITY THAT IS AS, PERFECT WITHOUT STARCHING
A^FTER LAUNDERING AS BEFORE
-
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s
-FISHER®
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LWAYS RELIABLE^
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MtttiwiitHdtflMmnmimnisHmtiMniiKituaiitiHiNwianaHauctt»!«
.
/
up—out of the age of chaperones. A
group of our prominent ladies who
still desire to be termed as "Boze
man's popular girls" astonished us
by planning a trip through the park
without a chaperon who, according to
Hoyle, is necessary unless the parties
are married or old maids. These girls
aren't married so—?
I Times have changed since the days
of our grandmothers—nay since those
of our older sisters. It is customary,
if we are to judge from recent events,
It seems to be the latest fad to
have summer boarders, that is if we
are to judge by those who have re
turned from the more effete east.
Miss Maurine Plew entertained a
few friends at an informal gathering
Sunday for Miss Ollene Anderson,
who is visiting her for the summer.
The guests were Marion Sikking,
Frances Leston, Mayo Story, A. M.
Schneider, Ben Chestnut, Bruce Hol
lister, George Finley and Joe Sween
who do not care to walk. ,
—Bozeman Chronicle.
This may look like a misprint but
those who have cars know it to be
more truth than poetry.
ey.
»
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Just
Arrived
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SOME NEW SPORT OXFORDS FOR LADIES
1
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MEN'S AND LADIES' HIGH BOOTS
Dressy and fit the foot. Just the thing for
Park Trips
1
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1 T
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j
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1
1
The
1
i
Exclusive Shoe Store
LANG BROS.
to spend a few days at a resort with
your "to be." Rather hard on him
paying bills "before" and "after.
—THE PEST.
>•
WILLOW CREEK WOMAN
DIES AT HER HOME
Mrs. Mae Dahl, wife of Alfred J.
Dahl, died at her home in Willow
Creek at 12:30 p. m., July 1, after a
lingering illness.
Minneapolis on September 24, 1888,
being a daughter of MY. and Mrs. E.
She
Painesville, Minn.,
where she received her education.
On September 23, 1909 she was
married at Billings to A. J. Dahl,
who survives her, as does also a
daughter, Audrey May, three years
old. Three sisters survive. She is
also survived by her father in Maus
ton, Wis., and by a brother in Cal
gary, Canada. Her husband is agent
at the Northern Pacific depot in
Willow Creek, where he and his fam
ily have lived for the past six years.
Mrs. Dahl was an earnest worker in
the Women's club of Willow Creek,
in the Methodist Episcopal church
and the Ladies' Aid society. She and
hèr husband have been among the
most highly esteemed citizens of the
community.
She was born in
A. Hearnes of Mauston, Wis.
was reared in

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