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The Bozeman courier. (Bozeman, Mont.) 1919-1954, August 31, 1921, Image 12

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075113/1921-08-31/ed-1/seq-12/

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(Continued from Page One).
has been so successfully persued
there, he stated, could also be put in
to effect here in Montana. There, he
stated, when a man writes or makes
inquiry about the land, he at once
IRRIGATION TO SAVE
finds the state interested in him.
receives communications from
He
the
This
various state officials, giving him
all the information needed,
covers the nature of the land, the
equipment needed to work the farm
land, the cost of clearing the stump
age. and many other details it is so
necessary for him to know. He is
warned against the swindler, and told
thaE unless he has the strength, the
inclination to work hard, and the de
sire to devote several years to hard
labor, he should not take up any
land
The truth is what is needed," said
Dr. Newell, "and when that is told
there will be less disappointments
..
and fewer failures on the farm lands
of this great state of Montana-' We j
must overlook the sins of „ omission j
and commission which we have done I
in the past in Montana and start
anew by going before the people and
telling them what we have here. We
must show that we have cheap land,
which w U produce good crops with j
water, the water must be secured at
a high •;.rice, but when once secured
and used properly, failure will he !
something very unusual. To you busi- j
ness men, you who have the welfare !
of the people to guard, I commend ■
the future of irrigation and the fu-1
ture prosperity of Montana. It is
your duty to see that the proper
methods are persued in securing set
tlers m the future, and also in know
ing the calibre of the settlers who are
induced to come here to live."
United State., reclamation service for
Dr Newell was at the head of the
seven years, and connected with the
department from 1886 until recent
ly. He is at the present time in Mon
tana to attend ch© international con
férera e' to be
tembor 15th, at which time the div's
Cninook
Sep
al
KO
ion uf the wot. of the Milk liver
wdl be di-u-s d He will represent
the United Stab's at the coni' rmce.
Dean Hamilton made a very xlover
talk when introduring Dr. Newell
and refemd to the matter of fail
uro> in farming in Montana as the
ro nit of the people of the- state not
toll ng the f* ut v * to the incoming set
tlers. He expressed the hope that in
the future there would be less of th°
hurrah
used hv thoi
d more of common sense
who rre
busine ss to s< li land in the state.
Tk ?t'. nant Governor Nri-c-n Story,
Jr., also discussed the situation and
stated it as his opinion that ali Mon
tanans were to blame for the situa
tion. Ho recalled to the minds of
those who had 1 ved in Gallatin val
rnakin
it a
ley for n any years, the hardships un
dergone by those who had first start
ed to irrigate the valley.
"One of the great
made in Montana was when the peo
ple of the state voted down the meas
ure last fall which was intended to
help those who are right now suffer
ing," said Mr. Story, "and it is just
such action as this which has given
this state a bad reputation from an
agricultural standpoint. That meas
mistakes
ure, had it been passed by the peo
ple. would have made it possible for
the irrigable land in the state to re
•ceive the financial aid it needed. It
would not have added one cent to the
taxes of the people of the state, but
would have made it possible to pro
duce many millions of dollars' worth
of products and in that way the state
would be in a position to help the
worthy farmer.
•>
Those present at the dinner were
Dr F. H. Newell, J. M. O'Gorman, A.
A. Braten F. B. Linfield, J. M. Ham
Lieutenant Governor Nelson
Jr., E. B. Norris, A. C. Hall,
W. R. Plew, H. S.
Ium,
Nci-/,
Carl Widener,
Buell, W. R. C. Stewart, F. C- Cool
y. J. C- McCarthy, Edmund Burke, J.
A. Harader, Don Anderson and S. C
Moore.
Dr. Newell spent Tuesday as the
ruest of his daughter and husband,
THE KIWANIS CLUB
-
J. M O'Gorman, departing in the aft-
for Helena.
; muon
MANY ACTIVITIES FOR
(Continued from Page One).
< lub n any way they can be of as
• w? It also stated there would
n large delegation of Great Falls
''embers at the State convention,
dembers of the Bozeman Club are
also to attend and it is expected to
bo a huge success.
Assisting the college students to find
employment was considered, Mr, R. O.
Wilson, Registrar at the College,
spoke of the need of assistance for
those who desire the higher education
but who do not have funds necessary
to carry them thrugh the year.
In telling of the good done in as
sisting the students at the college
Mr. Wilson gave out some figures
covering the earnings of students
He stated that a record kept showed
that $65.000 had been earned by
while attending the Montana
students while attending the Montana
State college in Bozeman This sum,
it was figured, was practically all
spent right her© in the city so that
in helping the student by giving emp
loyment, the money was returned to
the employer.
At the conclusion of his remarks
Mr. Wilson distributed cards to the
members asking them to fill them out
and IX unable to use them to pass
them on to someone who might need
help. The cards are for the purpose
* ; I 'jj (>' , , , ,
of listing the name pf the * firm or !
person who can employ a student, )
the kind of work and the approximate;
1 length of time they will be required j
to work. The Club members voted
to assist in every way to secure work
for all students possible,
A rising vote of thanks was tender
; edMr. George Dier for his kindness in
tendering the use of his cottage on
West Gallatin for the preliminary
training of the Montana States col
lege football team. Thanks was also
voted to Mr. Pete Karst for his of
fer to furnish cottages and grounds
for the team, which offer was accept
ed. The secretary was instructed to
write both men and convey the action
of the club to them.
In the absence of President Green
the meeting was presided over by
C. E. Bunker.
CHARLES ANCENEY WON
RIBBONS LONG AGO
_ (Continued from Page One),
itably filling in those efforts, Untill
we _ hastily inspected his fine stock
- x h'-bit at the Territorial Fa.r recent
y held Helena. It was not only
remarkably varied, . and extensive,
hut many of the animais# were equai
no ^ superior to the finest and best
m exhibition, for that matter, ever
imported the territory,
Looking over our memorandum
' as ^ ^ jotter down at toe time we
*' nt ^ *he following: —
P°H e< \ Angus thoroughbred
hubs, one year old; very large, line
-inimah-; jvcond premium
One Polled Angu > pedigreed bull
ree yea?s oid; very fine annual;
-h
ond pi
Two
äl. 11 urn.
three-year-old
bulls; first and second premiums.
One fine large Shorthorn, less than
v. C
Shorthorn
two years old; not entered for prem
ium.
Ore twe -year-old Shorthorn bud.
warded fixest premium; sold to Louis
Romaine of Dry Creek, Gallatin
county.
One three-year-old Shorthorn im
ported bull; second premium.
On? Shorthorn graded heifer and
•:Polled Angus yearling- Short
u r, awarded first premium.
Two yearling Shorthorn heifers;,
t'hvt and second prem iums.
Two two-year-old Polled Angu r
rr.ded ht fers, not entered for prem I
ium.
Polît l Angus two-year-old h fer
with calf at side; f5 »st and second
premiums.
Two Shortrorn graded cows, high
ly bred; second premium for both.
One Shorthorn four-year-old cow;
. -vied eff fir^t prem 'um and sweep
e over all exhibit"on. Con Kohrs
•renounced her the best and flne-t
cow in Montana
Thoroughbred Durham cow, five
years old; second*premium.
A pen of seven yearling Polled An
gus and Shorthorns; remarkably
'arge and well bred. '
'•Lubin," a fciacks four-year-old
tailion: second premium. Came with
in a hair of winning f'rst. Was im
ported from France by W. Durham
of Illinois, and sold to Mr. Anceney;
said to be the best driving animal in
Montana.
One iron gray American mare,
with one of the finest colts imagin
able, from "Lubin.
Bay mare five years old with colt
from "Lubin " Mr. Anceney ha?. 30
tf
or 40 colts from the same horse.
Colt first premium and mare second.
Thus is briefly outlined a few sam
ples from Mr. Anceney's herd, and
our reader must agree with us that
the exhibit as a whole vrould be very
creditable to any stockgrower in any
country on the face of the globe.
MANY ENTRIES FOR
FAIR AT BELGRADE
(Continued from Page One),
made there will be a big livestock pa
rade which will be one of the big fea
tures of the fair.
In the domestic scitnce depai'tment
here will also be a very fine exhib-
; t. The canning demonstration is to
he in charge of Miss Emily iLnhoff,
assistant club leader for girls, and
she will be assisted by Miss Marjory
"Jnvgess, who has been coaching the
h'ams. Mrs. Brennegan will judge
v« v/ork and it is predicted the job
will be a difficult one due to the high
noy of the girls in the work.
There will be one team from Man-
hattan anti one from Bozeman, and a
jelly making team in the contest. The
-iris are all ready for the event and
'ach team feels confident of bemg the
In this department also the
will be sent to the state fair
ty.
winner
winner
at Helena to represent Gallatin coun
The grain .exhibits will not be so
the garden products. In the
large as
latter division there will be an excel
lent showing of what the boys and
girls can do and it will be a very
commendable showing.
The fair will be the windup of a
"year's efforts upon the part of the
boys and girls of Gallatin county and
the exhibits will all be of a very high
quality. They should receive the very
best encouragement possible"trom the
older folks. The parents should all
make it a special occasion and attend
tht showing. Not only the parents,
in the county who
;ounty.
fronts, and the extranoe to the ex
hibit hall wall all be handsomely dec
but every grownup
possibly spare-the time should go
to Belgrade and see the work of the
future citizens and producers of this
can
Belgrade will pot on a gala attire
or the two days, the streets, store

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In Suits, Coats, Furs,
Dresses, Skirts and Waists
At the New Low Prices
nfo
I
PECO PLUSH COATS WITH LARGE
FUR COLLARS
NEW SLEEVELESS DRESSES IN JERSEY
AND SERGE
$19.98
$5.75
FUR TRIMMED S13TS IN NAVY AND
SÎLK JERSEY PETTICOATS IN ALL
* COLORS
BROWN
r
I
!
»
<
$27.50
$2.98
*
*
V PATTERN HATS IN MANY SHAPES
AND COLORS
NEW
SILK GEORGETTE WAISTS, SILK
EMBROIDERED
*
i
$4.98
$3.98
Î
SMART STYLES TRICOTINE
LINS
CHILDRENS HOSE
RIBBED/
DRESSES
N
l
I]».
$19.98
25c
'
!
orated by the commercial club of the
city. The decorations will be of agri
cultural products and will in itself
be a fine demonstration of the var
iety and quality of grains and
grasses produced in the county .
Everything starts promptly at 9:30
in the morning on next Friday.
MARY CURL BECAME
BRIDE ON TUESDAY
(Continued from Page One),
activities.
Mr. Ingram studied electrical en
gineering at the State college, where
he graduated and has since become
ployed by the General Electric Co
>f New Haven. Conn. He. was bom
and grew up at Helena, where he re
sided until taking up his studies in
Bozeman. He is a member of the
8igma Alpha Epsilon and the Bouf
fon fraternities and was a very pop
ular member of the college student
bodies.
MARKETING METHODS
USED BY CREAMERY
(Continued from Page One).
porations. As a rule the stock com
■ any creameries purchase the butter
fat from the farmers outright at a
price based on a recognized whole
sale butter markets like Chicago and
New York. Sometimes they will pay
the farmer the average price for but
ter less a fixed manufacturing charge
of from two to four cents per pound.
It is the general custom among the
these
creameries in
Mates to recèive the raw materials
hen manufacture sell and the finish
ed product at the best possible price.
At the end of the month the cost of
manufacturing and other operating
expenses plus a small sinking fund
deducted from the gross'return °*
,ales. The net returns are then pro
rated among the patrons on the basis
of the number of pounds of butter
fat delivered'. This plan is perfectly
fair to all patrons but is not so satis
factory as the more modem plan of
paying market prices for the cream
each day and then at the end of the
year pro-rate back to each patron the
surplus they may accumulate each
month. This plan enables the farmer
to realize on the product that may go
onto storage for a short period
It is customary for local co-oper
ative creameries to require the farm
er to deliver his milk and ceam or to
pay the cost of collecting. Pamers'
Bulletin No. 690 shows that reports
from 126 creameries in Wisconsin in
dicate that 71 creameries include the
cost of collecting in the operating ex
are
prfcnse, while 54 charged the costs of
collecting to the patron. The cost of
collecting varied from half a cent to
4-6 cents per pound of buttefat, with
an average of about 1-7 cents. The
patrons of many local creameries in
Minnesota have organized "rings" of
two or more farmers in wh : ch each
takes his turn in hauling. This plan
gives each member full benefit of a
delivered price. At about 20 per cent
of the creameries, all or pai*t of the
cream is gathered by routes, the av
erage length of which is about twen
ty-three miles at a cost averaging
2.7 cents per pound of buttefat.
In transporting of cream by rail
way to 40 centralizing creameries the
average express cost is reported to
be 1.6 cents per pound of butterfat.
However, this does not include the
cost of the farmer of getting the
cream to the railway station, which
would naturally be about equal to de
livering the same cream to a cream
ery.
A large number of creameries have
recognized the relation of first grade
cream to the securing of a high grade
butter so have tried to encourage the
cooling of cream on the farm and to
encourage more frequent deliveries
by paying a lower price for off fla-
vored. second grade cream. Two
grades are usually employed with a
cut of prevailing market prices of
two to five cents per pound of butte-
fat on all second grade cream. The
results from eight creameries that
grade the cream and churn the
grades separately show an average
increase in price of 3.6 cents per
pound /or# the butter churned from
the first grade creame. This is the
only safe and proper way to conduct
a creamery in these days of keen
competition on the butter markets.
There are 811 co-operative cream
cries in Minnesota. About 80 per
cent of them pay their patrons once
a month and 16 per cent pay twice a
month, while the frequency of pay
ment varies with others. In Wiscon
sin reports from 250 creameries show
48 per cent paying monthly, 35 per
cent paying semi-monthly, and the
rest daily or weekly. The more mod
ern way is for the co-operative
creamery to pay market price for
butterfat daily then at the end of the
year apportion the extra dividend to
each patron on a patronage basis.
The advantages are the elimination
'of delay in sending out the checks
as it is not necessary to wait for re
turns on the butter then it gives
the manager more range in changing,
prices to meet competing buyers in
the same locality.
MANY NEW NAMES AMONG
FACULTY AT STATE COLLEGE
(Continued From Page Six)
Utah Agricultural college, is appoint
ed instructor in agronomy.
James R. Barker, a graduate of
the Utah Agricultural college, is ap
pointed instructor in Irrigation.
Warren N. Christopher, who has at
tended Yale university, is appointed
bacteriology. »
Raymond G. Church, a graduate of
the University of Cincinnati, is the
new instructor of physical plant at
the State college.
It is believed that a few more ap
pointments will be announced before
the opening of the autumn quarter
on September 26.
"TUBBY" GRAVES IN THE
HOSPITAL
Sunday night Coach D. V. Graves
was operated upon at .the Deaconess
hospital for appendicitis. He is re
ported to be recovering very nicely,
due to the fine physical condition he
was in when taken to the hospital
He was suddenly taken ill Sunday
morning and upon an examination be
ing made by the doctor it was decid
ed an immediate operation was nec
essary.
football fan in the both
of the college students and men about
the town, felt a shock of surprise at
hearing the coach was in the hospital.
NEW ISSUE OF MONTANA
BOOKLET
The "Montana" 1921 issue from tho
office of Chester C. Davis, commis
sioner of agriculture, reached this of
fice Monday. It is a very-handsome
edition and contains a great deal of
valuable information. It is called the
Tourist Edition and contains useful
information fo^ them, besides con
taining routings of all the national
highways, mileage and locations
Bozeman is designated . on all the
routes.
One of the features of the booklet
are the many beautiful halftones
showing the many interesting points
that are attractive to the tourist. Of
these there are six showing various
scenes in Gallatin valley. The West
Gallatin river, along which the Gal
'atin Way travels, is shown, as are
some of the other many interesting
locations. A Gallatin wheat field is
also shown, and there is quite a good
amount of space given to the agri
cultural development of the county.
It is an edition that the commissioner
and the state can wuU take pride in
showing.
Gallatin Valley Lands
BARGAINS
FOR SALE—Six room modem
house, corner Lamme and Fifth;
good garage and bam; two lots; $3,
250; $1,000 cash; balance easy terms;
taxes and^ assessments paid for this
year.
We can locate you in a modeirn bun-
galow on the south side of town at
prices that will suit your purse.
FARMERS—Have you taken out
hail insurance? We represent two
Come in and let us tell you of some
of the claims we have paid and the
satisfaction given in adjustments.
Don't wait till you are hailed out an4
then regret not haviny any insurance^
If you have property you want to
sell, list it with us now and we'll
advertise it and push it this fall; if
you want to buy, come in and see us.
Nice 6 room house with bath. Two
lots, chicken house and sheds, some
fruit and on paved street. $3,000, half
cash if sold soon.
Special Mention—Nice eight-room
modem house for sale, nicely fur
nished; three lota, stable, garage and
sheds, and on a paved street close to
business section. The price is so low
and the term so easy on this place
that we would rather tell them to
you personally than to advertise
them because we do not wish to be
little the true value of the property
MONEY TO LOAN
(Over Courier Printing Office)
Pha* 127-W '

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