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The Bozeman courier. (Bozeman, Mont.) 1919-1954, September 14, 1921, Image 6

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075113/1921-09-14/ed-1/seq-6/

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OUTLOOK GOOD FOR
PROFIT IN CHEESE
Present Production Far Below Aver
age of Five Years Ago With
Prices Remaining Strong
BL G. L. MARTIN.
The market situation with refer
cheese for the winter of 1922
is not easy to predict. The interna
tional movements in cheese in 21
eouutries of the world since pre-war
tfn-pç, in 1913 have shown f decided
dec terse of about 30 per cent. This
has been due to shortage of feed and
ttv> unsettled market condit'ons in Eu
ence to
rope and to the great reduction in
buying power of the nations, togeth
cr with about a two per cent reduc
tion in general consumption. How-|
ever the cheese consumption in Eu
lia snot fallen off so much as the
imption of butter, for cheese is
used as a substitute for meat while
brft< r is either dispensed with alto
getner or replaced by cheaper substi
tu tes. In the United Kingdom, which
is the greatest importing country of
rope
ci
the world, shows a decrease in the
use of butter in 1920 compared w:th
1913 of 57 per cent, while there was a
24 per increase in tho use of
cheese.
The quantity of cheese coming into
the United States in 1913 praticular*,
ly from Italy and Switzerland, has
piactically ceased, while in 1920 this
country changed from an importing
to an exporting country, showing a
deer asing surplus of about 1,400 tons
1919, and only about 150 tons in
in
These conditions are due to a
lessened domestic consumption and
t< general quiet trade conditions in
both Europe and America.
1929
Both th;- production and consump
tion of cheese fell off in this coun
try the past year, but production
has increased again during the last
three months, due to the closing
down of many cendensaries and the
conversion of milk into cheese.
Prior to the war Canada was the
•rj'ost ehe. s' ox porting country of
g ri
pounds.
{9 - world, but she has no beer, replac
ed by New aland, which in 192° ex
ported about
Cheese production in Canada has n
>ral decreased while the produc
er condensed milk ice cream and
us„ of whole milk and cream in
i v* ho- ie have increased.
Th price of cheese in this country
has followed the general decline of
During the past few months buying
20.000,000
com
tion
flu
:v.
8
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ave You That New Fall Hat or Cap
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We are now showing the latest
styles in men's headwear
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« A WORLD OF CLASS
IN CAPS

/
For general wear and honest to goodness com
fort there's nothing like a cap.
Ours especially made for us are values and styles •
that haven't been offered before.
You will like that nobby little shaped hat as it
is becoming to almost every man.
Our extensive display offers you many patterns
for choice
$1.25 to $3.00
New Prices $ 5 and $6
Holloway's
"If it's new, we have it."
Ray Holloway
Frank Preston
'
-
r
in the cheese markets was rather
slow* owing to the fact that none of
the buyers wish to store on a declin
ing market but now the price is back
to the last winter mark.
The daily market reports would in
dicate that only about 60 per cent as
much cheese went into storage the
past few months as the holdings last
This would indicate that the
year.
price of cheese will remain generally
at a strong price the next few months
in comparison with other farm prod
W T ith the general increase in
ucts.
the USe °f m, dk and cream in trm
home together with the great increase
in the use of ice cream would imk
cate a favorable outlook for good
nr ces for butterfat at the cheese
factory this winter,
Gallatin county is especally adapt
ed to cheese making. We now hav*
several factories in operation with
j plenty of room for more. The Cen
; tral Park factory is making a very
high giade of brek cheese while the
j Sedan factory is making Cheddar,
| Both factories have been able to se
1 cure a ready market in Montana for
everything they put out. Several of
! the large stores in Helena state that
they prefer Gallatin made cheese to
that made anywhere else.
s -
ttttnnnnttttnttUtitlttXt
♦♦
**
;♦
-
Autumn Quarter Beings S**pt. 26
**
«
COLLEGE NOTES.
n n nn nn
« « »
« « « n
••
The autumn quarter at Montana
State college will begin on Septem
hrr 26. with registration of students,
On September first about 150 new
students were registered by mail, tho
j largest mail registration in the his
j tory of the institution. President At
k nson and Registrar R. O. Wilson
both nredirt an usumiaMy large reg
istration this fall in the freshman
class and an increasing percentage of
returns for the three higher classes, j
- j
All Ready for Big Training Camp !
Despite tho illness of Coach D. V. \
Craves cf Montana State college, ar
rangements have been carried ahead
for the fall football training camp at :
+ he Karst Cold Springs ranch, in the
West Gallatin canyon. About thirty |
football players have written to the ;
i coach that they will report for squad,
practice at the camp.
It is planned to take the players
from Bozeman to the camp on Sep
tember 15, motor cars for tho 45-mile
journey being furnished by Bozeman
business men Cooks have been em
ployed to work at the camp and the
cabins and the cabins for the squad
are ready for the players' arrival.
Unusual interest is being taken in
Bozeman in the camp and the effect
it w 11 have upon the season's football
record.
Ex vacation Work Started
Exvr.cation work for the new
biology building at the State college
was begun this week. The cement
work on the foundation will begin
within 10 days, the contractors say.
Excavation for the new negineering
building foundation and for the gym
nasium is expected to start within an
other week.
Workmen are busy rebuilding the
drill hall on the site formerly occu
p ed by the "log house," an old col
lege land mark w r hich has been torn
down. This drill hall will serve one
more year as a gymnasium and then
will be converted into a stock judg
ing pavilion.
Exhibits at State Fair.
Many of the faculty members of
Montana State college are in Helena
at the state fa r this week, in charge
of State college, experiment station
or extension service exhibits. The ex
hibits from the institution are more
pretentious this year than for many
years.
^
Some of the choicest of the State
college and experment station live
stock is in Helena for the exhibit.
carload of sheep hogs and cattle left
members of tho animal husbandry de
partment in charge.
Prof. C. N. Arnett, who is a '
tor of tho State fair, left early this
v.-ctk for Helena. Dr. W. E. Joseph,
j n charge of the swine division at
the fair, left last week to get his do -1
partment lined u.p
The big exhibits from the institu
tion were shipped to Helena last
week. The largest exhibits is the
University of Montana map, which is!
electrically operated and lighted]
lato last week for Helena with two
Workmen have been busy for two j
months on this big exhibit:, and it
will be one of the features of the
fair. The farm management depart
rient took to the fa : r a model farm
tend, on a platform eight feet square,
Model buildings are arranged in mod
cl fashion on a model faiun. It is one
| of the most unique and attractive ex
; Mbits over prepared at the institu
tion.
-
Lower Rates Promised.
F. S. Cooley, secretary of the Mon
ter state
tana farm bureau and director of the
Montana extension service, has re
ceived assurance from tne American
Farm Bureau Federation that the in
is
commerce commission
working to have the railroads reduce
livestock rates in western territory
to about 80 per cent of the present
rate, where the rate is over 50 cents.
The saving would amount to about
$36 per carload on. stock from Mon
tana to Kansas City or Chicago, it is
said. The American Farm Bureau
Federation is working hard to get the
new fate declared in effect by the
railroads.
Contracts have been awarded for
the varioue departments of the state
schools by the state board of examin
Among those awarded was one
ers.
for the excavation and foundation for
the new gymnasium building at the
Montana State- college. This contract
went to the firm of Nelson and Peter
son of Butte, who submitted a bid of
$7,891.85, which was the lowest of
fered.
Thi ; work will be started at once
so that there will be no delay in the
completion of the building next year.
It is expected that the foundation will
be completed this fall, and this will
enable the building contractors to be
gin work early in the spring.
ABOUT TOWN.
A large crowd of friends and neigh
bors went to the home of Mr. and
Mrs. Harry Harlan on South Tenth
Monday evening to charivari and con
gratulate the bride and groom
Dir. and Mrs*. Bryan Harlan. There
was plenty of noise made by the mer
ry-makers, but a decidedly cool le
eeption was piven, instead of being
' nv ^ tc * n an< ^ treated, as ls cus t°*
maI T on suc occasions, frtoom
* cav,n £ he ailf * als bride would be
kidnaped. nia< ^ e his escape out the
t>ac ^ : c ' oor an< ^ turned a copious
tr ? ara 01 c<wa ^ cr on .
wou hl have been enjoyed had
^ le keen a httle warmei.
0011 *.?® t ' lc * excuse " lor * e
cor ^ ia ^ reception, for times are hard
for ^ orest range 1 * 5 -
Of
(Contributed)
MRS. SUVERLY DIES
\ After suffering for three weeks
from ptomaine poisoning, Mrs. D. A.
Suverly passed away last Sunday
night. She leaves a husband and one
daughter to meurn her death. Mrs.
Suverly has made her home on
Fourth avenue north until taken ill,
and since then has been at the home
of her sister, Mrs. C. F. Krause, 119
Eighth avenue north, where her
death occurred. Relatives out of the
city have been notified and arrange
ments for the funeral will not be
made until they arrive.
Charter No. 7441—Reserve District No. 9
REPORT OF THE CONDITION OF THE
NATIONAL BANK OF GALLATIN VALLEY
at Bozeman, in the State of Montana, at the close of business Sept. 6, 1921.
RESOURCES
Loans and discounts, indu ing rediscounts (ex
cept those shown in b and c).
Total loans ____
$628,524.61
628,524.61
Deduct:
Notes and bills rediscounted with Federal Reserve
• Bank (other than bank acceptances sold)
Overdrafts, unsecured ____
U. S. Government securities owned
Deposited to secure circulation (U. S. bonds par
value) ___
Total ..
Other bonds, stocks, securities, etc.:.
Banking house ...
Furniture and fixtures...
Lawful reserve with Federal Reserve bank.
Cash in vaults and amount due from national
banks ....
Amounts due from state banks, bankers and trust
companies in the U. S., other than included
in items 8, 9 or 10 .
Checks on other banks in same city or town as
reporting bank (other than Item 12).
Total of Items 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13.
Checks on banks located outside of city or town
of reporting bank and other cash items.
Redemption fund with U. S. Treasurer and due
from U. S. Treasurer.. .
22,050 00
295.27
606,474.61
295.27
15,000.00
15.000.00
41,107.93
26,319.00
2,697.65
29,01665
31,169.85
63,038.25
2,126.61
1,593.14
66,758.00
396.84
75000
Total.
$790,969.15
LIABILITIES
Capital stock paid in..
Surplus fund .
Undivided profits .
Less current expenses, interest and taxes paid....
Circulating notes outstanding.
Net amounts due to State banks, bankers, and
trust companies (other than included in
Items 21 or 22) .
Cashier's checks on own bank outstanding.
Total of Items 21, 22, 23, 24 and 25.
Demand deposits (other than bank deposits) sub
ject to reserve (deposits payable within 30
days):
Individual deposits subject to check.-.
Certificates of deposit due in less than 30 days
(other than for money borrowed).
Total demand deposits (other than bank
deposits) subject to Reserve, Items 26,
27, 28, 29, 30 and 31.
Time deposits subject to Reserve (payable after
30 days, or subject to 30 days or more notice,
and postal savings) :
Certificates of deposit (other than for money
borrowed) ...
Other time deposits .
Total of time deposits subject to reserve,
Items 32, 33, 34 and 35.
$60,000.00
30,000.00
6,82028
13,250.00
$16,238.71
* 9,118.43
14,367.69
19,755.24
34,122.93
283,174.66
10,895.24
294,069-90
209.990.98
142.715.06
152,706.04
$790,969.15
Total...
State of Montana. County of Gallatin
I. H. R. Greene, cashier of the above named bank, do solemnly swear
the above statement is true to the best of my knowledge and belief;
ss
H. R. GREENE, Cashier
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 10th day of September, 1921.
HUBERT D. BATH.
Notary Public for the State of Montana residing at Bozeman, Montana. My
commission expires April 3, 1922.
Correct—Attest :
AMOS B. HALL, O. A. LYNN, W. P. KNOWLTON, Directors.
Charter No. 4968—Reseiwe District No. 9
REPORT OF THE CONDITION OF THE
COMMERCIAL NATIONAL BANK
at Bozeman, in the State of Montana, at the close of business Sept. 6, 1921.
RESOURCES
Loans and discounts, including rediscounts (ex
cept those shown in b and c)..
Total .:.
Notes and bills rediscounted with Federal Reserv e
Bank (other than bank acceptances sold)....
Overdrafts, unsecured .....
U. S. Government securities owned:
Deposited to secure circulation (U. S. bonds par
All other United States Government securities.
Other bonds, stocks, securities, etc.
Banking house .-.-.
Lawful reserve with Federal Reserve bank.....
Cash in vault and amount due from national
Amounts due from State banks, bankers, and trust
companies in the U. S., other than included
in Items 8, 9 or 10.—.
Total of Items 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13.131,336.26
Checks on banks located outside of city or town
of reporting bank and other cash items.
Redemption fund with U. S. Treasurer and due
from U. S. Treasurer..
$1,398,526.26
1,398,526.26
50,000.00 $1,348,526.26
80124
801.24
62,500.00
257,000.00 •
319,500.00
217,178.64
327,094.05
77,824,6»
85,436.40
45.899.86
8,335.29
3,125.00
Total_
$2,433,721.42
LIABILITIES
$150,000.00
100 , 000.00
270,444.95
252.389.59
61,400.00
2,979.86
Capital stock paid in.
Surplus fund ..-.--
Undivided profits ..
Reserved for depreciation on U- S. Bonds.......
Less current expenses, interest and taxes paid..
Circulating notes outstanding.
Amounts due to national banks...
Amounts dut to state banks, bankers and trust
companies in the United States and foreign
countries ( other than included in 21 or 22)
Certified checks outstanding.-.
Cashier's checks on own bank outstanding
Total of Items 21, 22, 23, 24 and 25.
Demand deposits (other than bank deposits), sub
ject to reserve (deposits payable within 30
days):
Individual deposits subject to check.-.
Certificates of deposit due in less than 30 days
(other than for money borrowed)...
State, county, or other municipal deposits secured
by pledge of assets of this bank.
Total of demand deposits (other than
bank deposits) subject to Reserve, Items
26, 27, 28, 29, 30 and 31...
Time deposits subject to Reserve (payable after
30 days, or subject to 30 days or more notice,
and postal savings) :
Certificates of deposit (other than for money
borrowed) -
Other time deposits
Total of time deposits subject to reserve
Items 32, 33, 34 and 35
United States deposits (other than postal sav
■ mgs) •
252,064.14
18,380.81
18,055.36
5,599.85
828-25
15,214.18
24,622.14
679,887.04^
137,882.82
10 , 000.00
827,769.86
339,460.06
282,259 31
621,719.37
including War Loan deposit account and de
posits of United States disbursing officers
Bils payable, other than with Federal Reserve
bank (including all obligations representing
money borrowed other than rediscounts.u...
Bills payable with Federal Reserve Bank.
t
820.46
200 , 000.00 *
196,000.00
Total..
State of Montana, County of Gallatin—ss.
I, J. H. Baker, casMer of the above-named bank, do solemnly swear
that the above statement is true to the best of my knowledge and belief.
J. H. BAKER, Cashier
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 10th day of September, 1921.
(Seal) „ JOHN KOUNTZ,
Notary Public in amd for the State of Montana, residing at Bozeman. My
commission expires March 4, 1921.
Correct—Attest:
GEORGE COX, CHAS. VANDENHOOK, JOHN WALSH, Directors.
$2,433,721.43

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