OCR Interpretation


The Bozeman courier. (Bozeman, Mont.) 1919-1954, October 26, 1921, Image 6

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075113/1921-10-26/ed-1/seq-6/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

LAND PROBLEMS TO
BE INVESTIGATED
Secretary Wallace has appointed a
committee of six scientists of the De
partment of Agriculture to consider
the entire problem of land utilization,
especially with respect to the coun
try's future requirements.
In appointing the committee Secre
tary Wallace suggested that as the
basis of the work to be undertaken
careful consideration should be de
voted to the country's present crop
production, home consumption and
foreign demand, relating the land now |
under cultivation to present and near
future demands. It seems to the Sec
rotary that this study should be fol-lnot
lowed by a more careful survey and
classification than has yet been made
of lands which can be brought under
cultivation in the future, and the con
ditions necessary to make it profi
table under the plow.
The suggested survey would include
the arid lands of the West suitable
I
for irrigation, swamp lands which can
be reclaimed by drainage, and the cut
over timberlands of the various sec
tions. In studying the cut-over lands
consideration will be given to their
possibilities both for cultivation and
for reforestation.
The personnel of the committee of
six is as follows:
Dr. L. C. Gray, agricultural econ
omist, Office of Farm Management
and Farm Economics, chairman.
C. V. Piper, agronomist in charge
I •
ENLARGING
It is not too early to have choice view r s of your summer
and fall outing trips enlarged for
Christmas Presents
We do Developing, Printing, Enlarging
ROECHER DRUG CO.
Prescriptions a Specialty.
116 East Main
Phone 327
■n
ON NOVEMBER 1st, THE
Oliver-Stout Implement Company
WILL TAKE POSSESSION OP THE
I
*■
OWENHOUSE GARAGE
B Now occupied by the Lund Motor Co. and will continue to
run the business as a garage and service station. We will
take in cars for both live and dead storage. We will ac
■ cept dead storage to run until spring and warm weather
I comes.
The repair department will be in charge of Chas.
Goodrich, a very competent man wTio has been running the
East End Garage for some time past, and he needs
further introduction to the auto users in this community.
We will have a night man and will always be open for
business.
no
;
.* És
J
Oliver-Stout Implement Co.
iman««
I
I
|
=
i
aii«ni:Wrt»»iiHiinJiiniinuniiimnn i inii i i, l „ l „ l i, lll#HIMiMllll s IIMBI(|lltnin|ngni{tiu||n|||J# . |iHfî|illl|niuijii||i|ii|jij(#j
Your Business Partner
It is a good bank's duty to assist its clients
—Whether they be the problems of a
merchant or a farmer. Both are business
men.
In fulfilling this moral obligation, we like
to consider our organization as your busi
ness partner—interested in your success.
CONFIDENTIAL COUNSEL
If you wish sound advice in seeking credit,
making investments, or even the more
personal problems of your business you
will be welcomed here. You will find
talk with our officers helpful.
a
-
s
I
?
SECURITY BANK & TRUST CO.
30 West Main Street
s
E
President: H S. BUELL
Cashier; W. N. PURDY
Vice President: A. G. BERTHOT
Assist Cashier: J. L. KETTERER
I
I
I
forage crop investigations, Bureau of
Plant Industry.
Dr. G. M. Rommel, Chief Animal
Husbandry Division, Bureau of An
imal Industry,
C. F. Marbut, scientist in charge,
soil survey investigations, Bureau of
Soils.
E. E. Carter, assistant forester,
Forest Service.
S. H. McCory, Chief Division of
Agricultural Engineering, Bureau of
Public Roads.
At the present time a little less
than half the total national area is in
j farms, and only about one-quarter of
! the total area is improved land. Many
j persons, deceived by these facts, as
sume that there is an unlimited re
serve supply of farm land. Such is
not the case, however; by far the
greater part of the 1,000,000,000 acres
yet in farms probably can never
be used for the growing of crops, and
that part of the reserve land which
may be regarded as potential farm
land can be brought into use only ac
heavy expense for clearing, drainage,
irrigation, or fertilization.
Population increases; land area does
not. The acreage of improved farm
land per capita, for instance, has de
clined at an ever-increasing rate since
1890. By 1950 the total population,
at a normal rate of growth, probably
will be about 150,000,000. This would
require an addition of 243,000,000
acres of improved land if present per
capita acreage of improved land is
maintained.
This situation presents tfie national
problem of how best to use drain
able, irrigable, cut-over, and lands of
inferior quality that heretofore have
T
been rejected as unsuitable—whether
they should be brought under the plow
or reserved temporarily or perman
ently for forest or grazing.*
The rate of expansion of our na
tional area also is an important factor
for consideration. Despite the im
pending demand for a large expan
sion of the land basis of American
agriculture, there are many reasons
why we should consider most carefully
before encouraging any considerable
expansion of land under cultivation
during, say, the next three
The shrinkage in the volume of farm
exports, the many indications of
probable increase of agricultural im
ports into this country, and the pre
sent depression in developed agricul
years
a
tural areas raise a serious question a
to the wisdom of an immediate policy
of stimulatihg the expansion of farm
acreage.
a FIVE RAILWAY
HEADS HURE DEFI
WASHINGTON, Oct. 26.—"Has
the seat of government been trans
ferred from Washington to Cleve
land? Have the lines of cleavage
that have separated the legislative,
executive, and judicial branches been
obliterated, and the powers hereto
fore exercised by congress, the presi
dent and the judiciary merged under
the control of five individuals?
These gentlemen assert that in their
hands, and in theirs alone, rest the
fate of 110,000,000 ! American?! A
proclamation has gone forth from
the Cleveland capital that unless the
tribute exacted by these dictators is
not laid at their feet by 6 o'clock
on the morning of October 30, the
rest of the nation will forthwith be
cut off from is sources of food and
fuel and other necessary suplies.
That embargo is to continue until
I the terms of the decree have been
} met to the satisfaction of its pro
j mulgators.
t_ * , ,
In anticipation of the refusal of
., . j , , , .
their demands, a careful campaign
, , , , -
has been planned for assault on the
-, j . tt -i
social and economic Me of the Unit
rri, „* 4 . i h u a
ed States. The attack will be made
, .,, ^
in waves, in accordance with the
highly successfu methods employed
in the world
u
have been divided into groups. They
are to follow each other at 48-hour
intervals in striking, until the entire
transportation system of the country
is tied up. But if, in the exercise of
a charitable dispensation, the Big
Five should decide at the last mo
ment not to inflict this disaster upon
the nation, they will be able to call
off the strike by means of a code
telegram. Each of the subordinate
officers in the attacking army has
been provided with the code key,
which will enable him to recall his
troops if the mystic words are re
ceived from the grand headquarters
at Cleveland.
The railroads of the country will
»be at a standstill as surely as the
sun will rise," says one member of
the oligarchy. "Nothing but a mir
acle can stop this strike," calmly
announces the master mind in the
conspiracy. He means, of course,
that nothing but a miracle can pre
vent the American people from starv
ing and freezing unless his terms are
met. Such colossal impudence was
never before directed at a free peo
•ple. In the midst of wealth of food
and fuel and other * supplies that go
to make life endurable, the country
is not going to be denied the'tr use
by a small minority of its citizens.
"The merits of the controversy
between the employer« and the em
ployes of the railroads have little to
..
do with the present situation. Re
gardless of the relative justice of the
contentions of either party, there
can be nothing in them so detri
mental to the interests of either as
to warrant the infliction of a scourge
of suffering and death upon millions
«L« xtnnnnnnnnnn&
\ •
n '
«
BRIDGER CANTON
»
»
'nnnnnnnttnnttnn&
Mrs. Walter Campbell was a guest
Friday of Mrs. Ole Oma.
Mrs. Alfred Nickles and son Fred
die were guests Wednesday of Mrs.
Nellie Craig.
Mrs. Vincent Baker of Josephine,
is visiting in the canyon with -her par
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Alex Swanson.
Miss Christina Marston of Butte,
spent last week visiting with Mr. and
Mrs. Ole Oma.
Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Esgar of Boze
man were guests at dinner Sunday of
Mrs. Sadie Rabe.
The Papke brothers are now busy
delivering baled hay to Bozeman from
their fathers ranch in the canyon.
Mrs. T. E. Vander Endie was a
guest last 4 week of Mrs. Sheridan at
her ranch home near Sedan.
Mrs- Swan Johnson of Bozeman
vis'ted a few hours Thursday with
Mr. and Mrs. Hyrum Diesen.
Mrs. C. P. Manry was confined to
her home several days last week suf
fering with blood poison in her foot.
Mrs. Alex Swanson spent several
days last week in Butte consulting
physicians regarding her health.
Julius Nickles who is ranching near
Toston visited Thursday evening and
Friday in the canyon with his bro
ther Alfred Nickles and family.
Miss Hazel Rabe left the first of
the week for Missoula to resume her
schoolstudies.
by the death of her father John Rabe.
Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Gray and
family of Bozeman were week end
guests of Mr. and
Christie.
Ray Reichman of Sedan drove his
herd of milch cows to Central Park
last week where he expects to leave
them for the winter.
Mr. and Mrs. Ole Oma entertained
She was called home
Mrs. Donald
at dinner Sunday, the guests
Mrs. Mary Hoff and family and Mrs
Elizabeth Whittman and family.
Y E. Vander Endie, cheese maker
for the Sedan factory is spending a
' . day ® in , Bill j n S s and Balentine
a , te ^ Usine ® s affairs -
M ° St °* the / anchers near Sedan
"°, W ,^ USy d f 1 1 Venn?: ^ rain
J Sa aa ta advantage of
*1 'ÎJf er and good roads *
, . V * Wll " amson who has made
, 13 ? me m ® canyon for a num
T" ° year ® Saturday for Ohio,
wh ^ re h ® ^ 1 J ISlt relatives.
. rs * Campbell and son Jim
j ^ ° i*? 6 lag tbed> bome
s ? h .°°^ Wlth the former's father
^ted Friday with Mrs. Nellie Craig,
0 E ° Cal F< f este i r ' EcL Porem an left
' a . ay f ° r the Cinnamon
statlon where he ex P ects to remain
***** tlme huntin ^ bi ~ me
, „ and Mrs * R * Kay accompanied
C. eir ^ ues ^ ^ rs- Boe and son Jack
° visited . a fe w hours Tuesday
W1 * Nellie Craig.
* ' s £ar and Elmer Barthol
emew of Bozernan motored thru the
canyon and down Brackett creek Sun
da y morning to their ranches
ni,« u xi. . ,
Chadboum where they spent the dav.
n ,
Mr. and Mrs. George Rammel and
.t.,, , T T , - _
two children, Vera and Jack of Boze
. .. , , , _ ,
man vlslted a few hours Sunday at
, ... , *
the ranch home of Mr. and Mrs- G. P
^
were
up
ranger
near
Cash Bargain Sale
i lid You Ever See A Lumber Yard
Sale? Well Here Is One

THIS STOCK ON SALE FOR TEN DAYS ONLY
Average value
.. % .16
. 1.00
Sale price
% .13
500 cedar split posts..
100 bunches standard cedar shingles
15 storm sash.
50 transoms—one light.
12 windows ■
3 doors, fir
4 used glass doors—one light
2 used plate glass doors.
25 porch posts :.
100 porch brackets .
20 six-inch drain tile .
25 cement blocks.
.75
4.00
2.00
1.25
.50
two lights
3.50
1.75
4.00
2.00
6.00
2.50
15.00
9.00
1.50
.50
.15
.06
.16
.05
.35
.15
IN ADDITION TO THIS WE HAVE ACCUMULATED THE
FOLLOWING L UM BER PRICED PER 1000 FEET
Average value
$ 30.00
. 85.00
. 125,00
. 60.00
Sale price
$ 20.00
42.50
75.00
30.00
5000 feet of grade lumber...
250 feet 1 x 3 fir flooring. . .
2000 feet 1x4 short maple flooring.
1000 feet 6-inch short clear cedar lapsiding.
Take it all or part of it
WITH EACH $50.00 ORDER — 1000 POUNDS LUMP COAL FREE.
COME EARLY WHILE STOCK IS COMPLETE
WE DO IT; OTHERS THINK ABOUT IT
Copeland Lumber Compan
PHONE 82
PHONE 82
ins
re
Mr. Brown has
been having his eyes treated. They
have been in a very serious condition
since he had the small pox last spring.
Otto Wicker who has been visiting
for some time in the canyon with his
brother W. E. Wicker and family left
the first of the week for his home in
Iowa.
Mrs. L. E. Rogers of Edmonton,
Alberta Canada is visiting with Mr.
and Mrs. Ed Foreman at the Bridger
ranger station. Mrs. Rogers and Mrs.
Foreman being cousins, and this is
their first meeting for 25 years.
Mr. and Mrs. Will Francis who
side near Belgrade spent last week
visiting with the formers parents, Mr.
and Mrs- J. L, Frances and brother
Clarence and family who live near
Sedan.
Mr. and Mrs. George Brown and
daughter Miss Mae returned to their
ranch home in the canyon Saturday
frorii Bozeman where they have been
for several months.
I The Natural Choice Of g
I Women Of Taste
I
«
>
<
<
For the woman who takes the same pride in the ap
pearance of her letters as she does in her home and her
frocks, w r e recommend
Crane's Linen Lawn or Eaton's
Highland Linen j
Two, papers of style and quality, with an air of refine- J
ment— always in keeping with, and reflecting the taste of \
those who use them.
50c and up
Now on display in a variety of styles
I
COX - POETTER DRUG COMPANY
10 E. Main
Phone 128
Supt. W. T. Thompson returned to
his home at the hatchery Thursday •
after spending several days at the
Glacier National Park, Kalispell and
other points looking after government
business. He was joined at Helena by
J. H. Bruinson Supt. of the State
fisheries who made the trip with him- •
Among the Bozeman visitors dur
ing the week were Miss Cressie and
Will Conz, Miss Opal Riley, Alfred .
Nickles, Mrs. Ole Oma, Mrs. Walter
Campbell, Mr. and Mrs. George Wil
liamson, Mrs. William Ross, Mr. and
Mrs. P. McMahon, Peter Dambres,Ed, *
Foreman and R. G- Gallup.
Prof and Mrs. W. T. Scott and two
children of Butte who came to Boze- .
man to attend the ball game Saturday
spent a few days visiting with Mr.
and Mrs. A. Paul Thompson and fam
ily in Bozeman and with Mr. and Mrs.
Butte.
W. T. Thompson at the fish hatchery
before returning lo their home in

xml | txt