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Yellowstone monitor. (Glendive, Mont.) 1905-1928, January 30, 1913, Image 8

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GAMDl
F.ETRICC
REGISTER.
ROCKFORD. IA.
CORRESPONDENCE
SOLICITED
'This matter must not be reprinted with
out special permission.]
The house pulms and ferns should
De giveu a bath now and then to rid
diem of mealy bugs and other insects
Uiat may be bothering them.
The present winter season is said to
5c- the first since the St Lawrence
river valley was settled that that
itream has not been frozen over by
fan. 1.
The relative purity and quality of
liffereut grades of gasoline «may be
letermined by ascertaining the rapid
ity of evaporation, the purer oil dis
ippearing the more quickly.
There are over 3.000,000 hired men
that cost the farmers of this country
jver a billion dollars annually. Per
haps this great army is more responsi
ble for the success of the business than
any other one factor.
Up to the 1st of January the folks
living in the Mississippi valley hardly
needed to go to California, Texas or
Florida to enjoy fine winter weather.
However, this statement is subject to
change without notice.
Do not bed pigs on oats, buckwheat
ar other dusty straw, and if the house
be dusty choose a warm day, sprinkle
with moistened sawdust and sweep it
thoroughly. Dust causes coughs, sore
mouths and sometimes death.
The egg selling crusade of the House
keepers' league of Philadelphia was
the means of knocking cold storage
eggs from 38 cents down to 24 cents
per dozen. There should be a sugges
tion in this for long suffering consum
ers in other parts of the country.
In the use of eggs for the table by
boiling in the shell it is well to remem
ber that strictly fresh eggs will lie
without tilting at the bottom of a dish
of water. As the age of the egg in
creases the air space enlarges, causing
one end to tilt and the eggs to rise to
the surface finally.
The other day ten carloads of oranges
were confiscated at a point in Illinois
by representatives of the United States
department of agriculture on the ground
of constituting a violation of the fed
eral pure food law. The charge on
which the fruit was Seized was that it
had been artificially colored to resem
ble the natural ripening process.
The $5,000 prize offered last year by
the Northwest Development league for
the best five bushels of wheat grown
In the American northwest has been
awarded to Messrs. Joseph P. Nash and
Charles Bridgeman, joint owners of a
ranch in Shields river valley, Montana.
The average yield on fifty-two acres
was fifty-nine and one-third bushels?
weighing a full sixty pounds to the
bushel.
Farmers in some sections of^ North
Dakota were up against a pretty stiff
proposition last fall in the shape of a
twenty-five cent potato market, four
dollar a day help and a freight rate
which practically prohibited their ship
ping their tubers to market in view of
the prevailing low price. In many in
stances they invited their neighbors in
and told them to help themselves for
the digging.
A score or more years ago an English
Immigrant to Australia took with him
a pair of hares to help keep him from
getting overlonesome. In time these
multiplied, as is the habit of the rabbit
family, and ran wild, and in the years
following tfce Australian continent has
had a veritable pest of rabbits. More
troduced, which in time also ran wild.
A remarkable flight of a carrier pi
geon is reported from Montreal by
Clarence Robinson, a resident of West
mount a suburb of that city. Some
•*> time ago be imported some pigeons
from England and a short time ?go
received word that one of the birds
brought over and which bad escaped
had returned to its former home in
England. Twelve days were required
to make the passage, and it is thought
for better roads or have such projects
I» tow*
took to the desert and now are said to
prey on newborn lambs.
JO maae tne passage, ana it is tnougnt
the bird must have rested on some s p
or floating object en route.
Road Improvement agitation seems
to be in the air. New York has voted
a second $50.000,000 bond issue. Penn
sylr.nl. will shortly rote a like appro
prtatlon, California Is now expending
an »I&00DXK» fond, while the state oI
Maine has authorized a $2,000,000 bond
with a big bond Issue which Is now be
Ing expended, while Minnesota. Win
cousin. Jowa and several other states
hare either voted large appropriation.
• s.
j It takes about so much fuel in the
shape of food consumed to keep an an
imal's body warm. For this reason it
Is a matter of economy to give the
itock shelter in the coldest weather in
order to reduce the feed bill referred
to to a minimum.
. ,. .
"«» In tong«- of colds or pneumonia
as a result cf overheating than they
Mutton sheep should never be mixed
breeds on the farm. Get one good inut
h>n breed, stick to it and develop to
the highest notch possible. A lot of
mixed lambs never bring the highest
price on the market. It is those of
one breed, uniform in size, shape and
condition, that get the big money.
Louisiana ranks first by a large mar
gin as a sulphur producing state. Nine
years ago sulphur was imported into
the United States to the value of $3,
709,690. During the year just closed
the total value of imported sulphur bad
shrunk to $552,836, and the output
from Louisiana is responsible for the
slump.
It would be interesting to know to
what extent milk and its products and
fruit and vegetables have increased in
value due to the large number of
householders the country over who
have given up or not taken up the
practice of keeping a cow and a gar
den. It seems to be largely a question
of more consumers and fewer pro
ducers.
A long suffering and overcharged
public is now getting considerable
chunks of satisfaction out of the fact
that the express companies of the
country have got some competition in
the shape of the parcel post and will
henceforth have to come across with
cheaper rates and more prompt service
if they expect to hold their own in the
package carrying business.
The small birds that spend their win
ters in the northern portions of the
United States should receive the en
couragement of a little grain scattered
for them, and some pieces of suet or
other meat scraps should be put out
where the snow will not cover them.
A good deal of pleasure during the win
ter months may be got by watching
the birds during their regular visits to
these feeding places.
Trees are spoken of as getting ripe
by the expert forester. He means by
this that they have arrived at an age
when they are at their maximum value
and when the process of growth is so
slow that it hardly more than offsets
the influences tending to disintegration.
When trees arrive at such an age they
should be removed to make room for
younger trees that may be growing or
might be grown in their stead.
We wonder what kind of an effect it
would have upon railroad accidents if
laws were passed in the several states
which would put in the category of
manslaughter the deaths of passengers
in railroad accidents resulting from the
carelessness or indifference of train
men and bolding equally responsible
for murder the officials of steel mills
that allow defective rails to leave their
shops. It is a fair assumption that if
laws of this kind were passed there
would be a noticeable decrease in rail
road fatalities.
It is well to keep in mind in con
nection with the new parcel post sys
tem, which became effective Jan. 1,
that seeds, cuttings, bulbs, roots,
scions and plants may be carried in
the parcel post mail under regulations
as to size and weight prescribed for
other merchandise, but at the former
rate of 1 cent for two ounces or frac
tion thereof, regardless of distance.
All other merchandise must be carried
by parcel post, and for this purpose
special stamps have been printed. Ac
cording to instructions from the post
office department, parcels bearing ordi
nary letter postage will be considered
as "held for postage" and not mailable
until the special parcel post stamps
have been affixed.
Householders as well as janitors of
public buildings, and what is said re
fers to the former even more than the
latter, would confer a great service to
those who gather as their guests if
they would take pains to see that their
houses are not overheated on such oc
casions. This "stoking up" of furnace
or stove is without doubt done with
t'ie best of intentions, but it is at great
risk to one's guests, who are vastly
may prevail at the time of their ar
rival . The tem perature should not reg
ister above 70 degrees F., and if it is
66 degrees there is far less danger than
if it is 75 or 80 degrees, as is too often
the case.
The writer would not unduly influ
ence any young fellow from following
a mercantile career, but he somehow
has the idea pretty well fixed that the
farm lad who gives Tip the chance to
take up scientific farming on the old
home place for the easier work to be
city clerkship, with an
fonnd in a
elght or ten „ lary . u makltlg g
nna , „nod sized mistake. True, lie
pretty good sized mtstake. True, he
can keep his hands softer and whiter
behind the counter, but he will earn
not a great deal above expenses. One
young fellow who comes to the writer's
Q _
^ T ?
**" *"* **"£"* or •**
" "EJ?™,.J" .'"l.ïfïT L!
■ «<«. op portunity, as he, but are still
th * ^° Un ''
* rituatlon above outlined Is one
WjMJM * toJTmS
may well - take
THREE MORE PRIZE WINNERS.
The second $200 gold prize appor
tioned to 'he state of Kansas in the
Kansas City Star's boys torn growing
contest was awarded to Lester Robin
son of Decatur county, within seventy
five miles of the Colorado state line,
who raised seventy-eight bushels and
thirty pounds of corn ou an acre in a
section the average annual rainfall of
which is but twenty-two inches. The
land that produced this acre had been
Id' pasture, was fall plowed to a depth
of eight inches, was cross plowed and
harrowed in April and plauted'early in
May with a lister, the rows being two
and a half feet apart and the kernels
twelve inches apart in the row. Dur
ing the season the crop was cultivated
six times. An interesting feature iu
connection with this acre of corn is
that home grown seed was used aft
er having been given a careful germi
nation test.
The third award of $200 iu gold went
to William Boone. Jr., a resident of
Doniphan, the extreme northeast coun
ty of the state, who raised 107 bushels
and forty pounds. The land which
produced the prize yield was rich sec
ond bottom. It was fall plowed and
given a coating of barnyard manure
and double disked in the spring before
plowing. The seed, which was home
grown Boone County White, was plant
ed with a planter in rows two and a
half feet apart and the kernels twelve
inches apart in the row. One deep and
five shallow cultivations were given.
Judges of this acre report the stand
too thick and that a larger yield could
probably have been produced if the
rows had been three and a half feet
apart and the kernels from eighteen to
twenty-four inches apart in the row.
The fourth $200 gold prize in the
same contest for Oklahoma was won
by seventeen-year-old Esta Beaman, a
young lady living near Meeker, in Lin
coln county. She succeeded in getting
a yield of ninety-five bushels and ten
pounds on a type of land pronounced
bv the judges to be the best suited to
corn growing of any in Oklahoma. The
acre was manured, plowed eight inches
deep in April and harrowed twice.
Boone County White seed was used,
and by careful testing of seed a perfect
stand was secured. The seed was
planted with ;» planter with furrow
openers attached. It was harrowed
after it came up and was cultivated at
intervals of teu days thereafter with a
spring tooth cultivator to kill weeds
and maintain a dust mulch. This
young lady did all the work of tending
the corn and raised a larger yield un
der adverse conditions than any of the
several hundred who took part in corn
growing in this and several other con
tests.
THOSE LAST THREE MILES.
A good old friend who is close to the
eighty year line and who for the past
forty years or more bas lived on the
old homestead, some six miles from
town, told the writer the other day
that if he had his life to live over again
he would do at least one thing differ
ent from what he had done—buy
a farm not more than three miles from
town. Being of a naturally social dis
position, our friend and the members
of his family have found that these ad
ditional three miles have served as a
sort of bar to keep them from enjoying
a good many privileges the town af
fords. They have meant a long drive for
the children to the town school, a late
return home after evening entertain
ments. in stormy weather the staying
at home almost entirely, while the ex
tra distance has resulted in a good deal
of extra hauling expense. And our
friend dwelt upon the fact that these
last three miles meant a good deal
more to an elderly person, whose vital
ity was low. than to one who was
young and vigorous. The writer be
lieves the point is well made and that
more should take the facts noted into
account when choosing a country home.
GOOD ROADS DEMONSTRATED.
A very definite demonstration of the
value to town aud country people of
smooth and hard roads has been given
during the past few weeks in the high
way conditions which have prevailed
in a number of northern states during
the interval mentioned. The dry weath
er and scant fall of snow, coupled with
the fact that the roads froze up smooth,
have converted them into virtually
paved highways. Over these smooth
roads farmers have been able to haul
just as heavy loads as It was safe to
put on their wagons, while the wear
and tear on motor power and vehicles
have been reduced to a minimum. This
has meant a greatly reduced hauling
expense. Moreover, town and country
dwellers have used their autos unin
terruptedly and with greatest satisfac
tion. A policy of permanent road build
ing carried out would give forever
on all buiit roads just the conditions
described. Wouldn't such a condition
of the highways be well worth while?
A COSTLY EXPERIMENT.
A South Dakota farmer with whom
the writer was talking the other day
stated that he got badly soaked the
past season as a result of planting a
considerable area to imported seed
corn of an unknown pedigree. It was
some southern variety and, although
growing to a great height, produced
not even nubbins—nothing but leaves
The experiment cost him a good round
sum. and he'll know better next time.
His experience proves nicely what is
coming to lie viewed as an important
point in corn growing—that seed
should be used that has been produced
near home.
A LE3AL CUR1CSITY.
Poetic Title Deed That Stood the Tort
of th« Courts.
A deed for the conveyance of a
piece of laud that is one of the great
est legal curiosities in the world was
Irawn up in 1881 by J. Henry Shaw a
awver at Beardstown, 111. The curio
•oniplies with every requirement of
aw aud has more than once been de
D-u-ed by the courts of that state to be
entirely valid. It reads as follows.
I J Henry Shaw, the grantor herein.
Who live at Beardstown. the county with
For seven hundred dollars to me paid to
(Jay
Rv Charles Wyman do sell and convey
Lot two (2) in block forty (40). said coun
ty and town,
Where Illinois river flows placidly down,
And warrant the title forever and aye,
Waiving a homestead and mansion to both
a goodby,
And, pledging this deed is valid in law.
I add here my signature, J. Henry Shaw.
[Sea.1-1 Dated July 2o, 1881.
I, Sylvester Emmons, who live at Beards
town,
A Justice of peace of fame and renown,
Of the County of Cass, in Illinois state,
Do certify here that on the same date
One J. Henry Shaw to me did make known
That the above deed and name were his
own, .
And he stated he sealed and delivered the
same
Voluntarily, freely and never would claim
His homestead therein; but, left all alone,
Turned his face to the street and his back
to his home. [Seal.]
S. EMMONS, J. P.
Dated August 1, 1881.
—St Louis Republic.
DO FLYING FISH FLY?
Science Thinks Not, but Many Ob
servers Say They Do.
The much mooted question, "Do fly
ing fish fly?" is discussed by William
Allingham iu the Nautical Magazine.
The orthodox scientific opinion is that
the "wings" of the flj r ing fish merely
serve as a parachute to sustain the fish
for a brief period in the air after he
has launched himself out of the water
by a powerful screwlike movement of
his tail. According to this view, the
fish has no power of directing his
flight after he has left the water.
However, Mr. Allingham, who is a
nautical expert attached to the British
meteorological office and Is in constant
intercourse with seamen, reports many
observations that tend to controvert
this opinion. Certain observers claim
that the wing fins are in constant rapid
vibration and seem actually to serve
the purpose of flight. One vessel mas
ter watched a fish that had attained an
altitude of twenty feet above the water
and was flying toward the mizzen rig
ging of his ship when, apparently
noticing obstruction, it changed its
course about 60 degrees, crossing the
vessel's stern to regain the water.
Many other similar observations are
mentioned.
A series of cinematograph pictures
might solve this question once and for
all.—Scientific American.
The Turk In Constantinople.
Terrible scenes w T ere witnessed in
Constantinople when Mohammed II.
captured the city in 1453. When the
conquerors entered they slew 7 2,000 and
made slaves of all w r ho took refuge in
the sanctuary of St Sophia. Gibbon
records the fate of the 60,000 prison
ers: "Male captives were bound with
cords, the females with their veils and
girdles. The senators were linked w r itb
their slaves, the prelates with the por
ters of the church and young men of
a plebeian class with noble maids
whose faces had been invisible to the
sun and their nearest kindred, and in
this common state of captivity the
ranks of society were confounded, the
ties of nature were cut asunder, and
the inexorable soldier was careless of
the father's groans, the tears of the
mother and the lamentations of the
children."
Purifying the Air In Rooms.
To purify the air of offices or sick
rooms soak a few 7 pieces of brown pa
per iu a solution of saltpeter and allow
them to dry. When desired for use
lay a handful of flowers of lavender,
which can be got at any drug store,
on a tiu pan with a few pieces of the
paper and light. The aroma is re
freshing and agreeable and drives
away insects. If hot water is procura
ble a few drops of oil of laveoder in
a glass of very hot w r ater is good. It
purifies the air at once and effectually
rids the room of flies and insects of
all kinds.—Scientific American.
Motorist's Luck.
"Well, Blithers, what luck did you
have with your new car?" asked Jar
roway.
"More than 1 ever expected," said
Blithers. "Just three minutes after
the darned thing blew up another car
came along with a busted tire, and the
owner bought my old tires for $10
apiece."—Harper's Weekly.
No Help.
"I admit that the architecture of this
house is something fierce," said the
agent, "but just see how bandy the
place is—only à stone's throw from the
station."
"I see it is," said Tomkins wearily,
"hut I'm such a rotten shot it wouldn't
be any satisfaction to me."—Harper's
Weekly.
Bit of a Wag.
•Tve bought a bulldog," said Parsniff
to his frieud Less up. "and 1 want a
motto to put over his kennel. Can you
think of something?"
"Why not use a dentist's sign. Teeth
Inserted here?' " suggested Lessup.-St
Louis Globe-Democrat
Talent Is that which is in a man's
power; genius Is that in whose power
a man la.
Married And Gone
A quiet but pretty wedding took
place yesterday afternoon at the
Episcopal church, when Miss Lulu
Lucas of Glendive and Dr. Guy
ward O'Neill were united in mar
riage. The ceremony was performed
by Rev. W. W. S. Raymond. Miss
Lucas is the daughter of a merchan
of Glendive and Dr. O'Neill is the
leading dentist of Roundup. A ter
a wedding supper as the guests o
C. B. Ingham, the happy couple lelt
for Roundup, where they will re
side.—Miles City Journal.
G. D. Hollecker left Monday even
ing for the east. _______
Methodist Episcopal Church
Class Meeting.............. 9: *^ a '
Public Worship............10:30 a. m.
Sunday School............11:45 a.m.
Epworth League............6:45 p. m.
Evening Preaching Service. 7:45 p. m*
Notice of Contest
Department of the Interior, United
States Land Office, Miles City, Mon
tana, Jan. 9, A. D., 1913.
To John Haider of Paxton, Monta
na, Contestée:
You are hereby notified that Eu
gene Zimdars, who gives Bloomfield,
Montana, as his post-office address,
did on Jan. 9, 1913, file in this office
his duly corroborated application to
contest and secure the cancellation of
your Homestead Entry No. G8599,
made April 26, 1912, for Si Section
2, Township 20 N. of Range 50 E., of
Montana Principal Meridian, and as
grounds for his contest he alleges
that the said land has not been culti
vated, improved or fenced, or resided
on since filing thereon, but that the
same has been wholly abandoned, and
that the absence is not due to your
employment in the U. S, army, navy
or marine corps in any capacity, .in
time of war or otherwise.
You are, therefore, further notified
that the said allegations will be taken
by this office as having been confessed
by you, and your said entry will be
cancelled thereunder without your
further right to be heard therein,
either before this office or on appeal,
if you fail to file in this office within
twenty days after the FOURTH publi
cation of this notice, as shown below,
your answer, under oath, specifically
meeting and responding to these al
legations of contest, or if you fail
within that time to file in this office
due proof that you have served a copy
of your answer on the said contestant
either in person or by registered mail.
If this service is made by the delivery
of a copy of your answer to the con
testant in person, proof of such ser
vice must biß either the said contes
tant's written acknowledgment of
his receipt of the copy, showing the
date of such receipt, or the affidavit
of the person by whom the delivery
was made stating when and where the
copy was delivered ; if made by regis
tered mail, proof of such service must
consist of the affidavit of the person
by whom the copy was mailed stating
when and the postoffice to which it
was mailed, and this affidavit must be
accompanied by the postmaster's re
ceipt for the letter.
You should state in you answer the
name of the postoffice to which you
desire future notices to be sent to you.
J. C. AULD, Receiver.
Date of first publication Jan. 16,
1913.
Date of second publication Jan. 23,
1913.
Date of third publication Jan. 30,
1913.
Date of fourth publication Feb. 6,
1913.
JENS RIVENES,
Attorney for Contestant.
Notice Of Contest
Department of the Interior, United
States Land Office, Miles City, Mont
ana.
To Elnora Kitchen of Glendive,
Montana, Contestée ;
You are hereby notified that Gert
rude Fryer who gives Glendive, Mont
ana, as her post-office address, did on
December 3rd, 1912, file in this office
her duly corroborated application to
contest and secure the cancellation of
your homestead Entry No. 013915, made
Feb. 17, 1912, for the west half of
Sec. 32, Twp. 21 N., Rge. Ç2 E. M. P.,
and as grounds for her contest she
alleges that Elnora Kitchen has never
established a residence upon said l anc j
as required by law and has never re
sided upon the same at all; thatsh e
has made no improvements upon the
said land as required by law ; that the
said Elnora Kitchen has wholly aban
doned the said land and her said
homestead entry for more than s j x
months last past.
You are, therefore, further notified
that the said allegations will be taken
by this office as having been confessed
by you, and your said entry will be
cancelled thereunder without your
further right to be heard therein
either before this office or on appeal
if you fail to file in this office within
twenty days after the FOURTH pub.
lication of this notice, as shown
low, your answer, under oath, specifi
cally meeting and responding to these
allegations of contest, or if y OU f a jj
within that time to file in this office
due proof that you have served a copy
of your answer on the said contestant
either in person or by registered mail.
If this service is made by the delivery
of a copy of your answer to the con
testant in person, proof of such ser
vice must be either the said contes
tant's written acknowledgement of
his receipt of the copy, showing the
date of its receipt, or the affidavit of
the person by whom the delivery wai
made stating when and where the
copy was delivered; if made by reg
istered mail, proof of such service
must consist of the affidavit of the
person by whom the copy was mailed
stating when and the postoffice to
which it was mailed, and this affi.
davit must be accompanied by the
postmaster's receipt for the letter.
You should state in your answer
the name of the postoffice to which
you desire future notices to be sen
to you.
-A. KIRCHER, Register.
J. C. AULD, Receiver.
Date of first publication, Jan. 9,
1913.
Date of second publication. Jan. 16,
1913.
Date of third publication Jan. 23,
1913.
Date of fourth publication, Jan. 30,
1913.
ALBERT ANDERSON,
Attorney for Contestant.
Sheriffs Sale
In the District Court of the Sev
enth Judicial District of the State nf
Montana, in and for the County of
Dawson. Mrs. F. E. Payne, plaintiff,
vs. Franklin P. Wright, defendant.
Sheriff's Sale:
To be sold at sheriff's sale on the
31st day of January, 1913, at the hour
of 2 o'clock p. m., at the frontdoor
of the Court House in Glendive, Daw
son County, Montana : The southeast
quarter of Section Four, in Township
Thirteen, north of Range Fifty-nine,
east of Montana Meridian, in Dawson
County, Montana.
J. D. WYNN, Sheriff,
3t46 By F. E. B., Deputy.
Sheriffs Sale
In the District Court of the Sev
enth Judicial District of the State of
Montana, in and for the County of
Dawson. Travis Payne, plaintiff, vs.
Franklin P. Wright and Jordan Realty
and Loan Company, a corporation, de
fendants. Sheriff's Sale.
To be sold at sheriff's sale on the
31st day of January, 1913, at the hour
of 10 o'clock a. m., at the frontdoor
of the Court House in Glendive, Daw
son County, Montana : The southeast
quarter of Section Four, in Township
Thirteen, north of Range Fifty-nine
east of the Montana Meridian, > n
Dawson County, Montana.
J. D. WYNN, Sheriff,
3t46 By F. E. B., Deputy
Madam, Read McCall's
The Fashion Authorit y
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