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Yellowstone monitor. [volume] (Glendive, Mont.) 1905-1928, April 22, 1915, Image 2

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075153/1915-04-22/ed-1/seq-2/

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NOTICE OF TEACHERS
EXAMINATIONS
Regular teachers' examinations will
v- r ~ ni n ~ai- ^ i«n&
at the Court House.
Private examinations will be held
at Circle, Jordan, Axtell, Bruce and
Van Norman, on the same date. 9-2t
CAMILLA OSBORNE,
County Superintendent.
NOTICE OF SALE
OF SCHOOL BONDS
Notice is hereby given that the
Trustees of School District No. 65, of
Dawson County, Montana will on the
15th day of May, 1915, between the
hours of 2 P. M. and 4 P. M. of said
date at the residence of Alois A
Hafele in Glendive, Montana, sell
bonds in the sum of $1,000.00, pay
able in ten years, redeemable in eight
years, bearing not to exceed six per
cent interest, for the purpose of pur
chasing a school lot and building a
school house thereon, and furnishing
the same.
The said Tustees reserve the right
to reject any or all bids and sell the
said bonds at private sale if they
deem such action for the best inter
ests of said district.
Dated at Glendive, Dawson County,
Montana, this 14th day of April, 1915.
Peter P. Russ,
Joseph Fetterhof,
Herman Bohlsen, Trustees.
Alois A. Hafele, Clerk.
Schol District No. 65, Dawson County,
Montana.
(First Publication, April 15, 4-t.)
$100
REWARD
$100
For information leading to the
arrest and conviction of any party or
parties stealing, shooting or molest
ing horses or cattle running on the
range belonging to
HARVEY BROTHERS,
p-11-1-15. J. C. THOMPSON.
»|< »I«
WANTS!
FOR SALE—Furniture, in good
condition. Apply Monitor office. 8-3p
FOR SALE—Two lots on Merrill
ave., in residence district. Inquire at
Monitor Office. 8-tf
FOR SALE—Good Piano for
cheap for cash, if taken at once.
Hugh Brown, 210 River Ave.
sale
Mrs
9-2t
FOR RENT—A modern 6-room house
located in nice neighborhood. Inquire
R. T. Carpenter, Clerk of Court'i
Office. 8-tf
FOR RENT
160 Acres of land on Deer
about 30 miles from Glendive.
Box 15, Paxton, Montana.
Creek,
Write
2-tf
WAGON FOR SALE—A Stoughton
wagon for sale cheap, been used a lit
tie over a year. Inquire, A. E. Dawe
Glendive, Aiont., in care H. F. Hill
iard. 7-4t
FOR SALE—A new model Pope Mo
tobike Bicycle, fully equipped, and used
but slightly. In perfect condition
Cheap for cash. Apply Monitor
Office. 5-tf
FOR SALE—A prosperous general
store and postoffice in eastern Mon
tana. Well stocked, up-to-date and
doing good business. Will sell rea
sonable for cash or terms can tie ar
ranged. Write "Editor, the Monitor,
Glendive, Mont 3-tf.
FOR RENT—A large office or store
on the ground floor of the Mead
Building opposite the Post Office
Full basement Modern. Newfloor
and completely renovated and re
modeled. Apply W. A. Rawson at the
Hotel Jordan. 7-tf
FOR SALE«—Nine head of race
horses, part of the string belonging to
the late E. J. Berry. Bishop Cox, the
largest standard bred stallion in the
world; 4 brood mares, 1 two-year old
filly and 3 colts. Will sell the entire
string cheap for cash. Apply W. A
Rawson, at the Hotel Jordan. 7-tf
FOR SALE.
Brood Mares from 6 to 8 years old,
also Geldings, 4 to 6 years old, weigh
ing 1100 to 1400, well halter-broken.
Address Glendive, Mont, or call at the
ranch on 18 Mile Creek.
35-tf. JA8. CAVANAUGH.
SALE
FOR
Farm Lease
Farm Contract
Chattel Mortgage
Real Estate Mortgage Blanks
Bills of Sale
Township Plats
For sale at the Monitor Office.
FOR BALK— Late Model 1913 Ex
celsior Motorcycle. Has just been
overhauled and new pistons and bear
ings installed. Tires have been run
leas than 600 miles. Machine has free
engine dise clutch, and is In perfect
running condition. First offer of
$110.00 cash, takes machine. Inquire
Monitor Office. 10-lt-p
to
of
erty
and
dent
iaee
iswawiBi
DEMOCRACY'S ACTS LAUDED AT
DINNER BY WAR SECRFTARY
the
of
the
the
A
a
He Declares Party Should Go Forward
To Make Government By the
People For The People
Stronger.
Pride in the performances of the
Democratic Party and confidence in
the political future were the chief
characteristics of the National Demo
cratic Club's Jefferson Day dinner
last night at the Hotel Savoy, at
which the praises of President Wilson
were sounded by several prominent
speakers, whose utterances were loud
ly applauded by about 400 of the most
influential Democrats in the city.
The presence at the dinner of
Joseph Tumulty, Secretary to Presi
dent Wilson, gave color to the report
that the occasion was to be used to
start a boom for the renomination of
the President. No boom was started.
Senator James Hamilton Lewis of
Illinois spoke of the possibility of a
renomination, but expressed the be
lief that President Wilson, could he
see all his policies enacted into law,
would prefer private life to a second
term.
Mr. Tumulty, who came from Wash
ington especially to attend the ban
quet, moved among the diners before
the speaking began, and appeared to
be talking politics with several of the
most prominent of those present. He
was due to leave the city shortly after
the dinner, however, and it was ex
plained there was no significance to
his visit and that his activity was sim
ply due to a desire to talk with old
friends.
President John M. Riehle of the club
presided. At the guest table with him
were Charles F. Murphy, Morgan J.
O'Brien, Secretary Lindley M. Garri
son, Charles F. Johnson, J. Thomas
Heflin, Mr. Tumulty and Senator
Lewis.
In his speech introducing Secretary
Garrison, the first speaker, Mr. Riehle
said there were no factions in the
Democratic Club and pointed to the
presence of members who had been at
odds paying a tribute to the memory
of Jefferson.
"Trustees for the Human Family."
Secretary Garrison spoke to the
toast "Democracy" and went at some
length into the history of the party
and the life of Jefferson, its founder
He made a strong plea for local auton
omy, and after telling of the accom
plishments of the Democracy conclud
ed:
'T often wonder whether we suffi
ciently realize the tremendous import
ance of this great experiment now be
mg tried upon this continent; one that
has greater potentiality for the happi
ness and welfare of mankind than any
other known to history. We are
very truth trustees for the whole hu
man family, in a very peculiar and full
sense of that word. If, by greed, neg
lect or perverseness we permit this
great experiment to fail, it will be
many long ages before those who
come after us will be able to embody a
like spirit in any form giving hope of
success. Filled with the sense of our
responsibility, proud of the opportun
ity to contribute our par:, conscious
that only by eternal vigilance can we
preserve our precious heritage and
hand it on unharmed, let us go forward
to the end that government of the
people, by the people and for the peo
ple shall not perish from the earth but
shall grow stronger and stronger with
the passage of time."
Senator Lewis went at length into
the accomplishments of the present
national Administration. He declared
that riot would have resulted had not
the Democracy been put in power in
1912, and continued in part:
The installation in power of Presi
dent Wilson and the high-minded men
of Christian character and noble souls
which surrounded him as his aids
gave guaranty to the Nation that its
institutions would be administered
with equity. This assured the citizen
ship. Then tumult was quelled, every
riot hushed, every insurrection sup
pressed, and in quietness and tran
quility they again acquiesced in a
peaceful Government through consti
tutional methods.
Then President Wilson began the
execution of his promises and the ful
fillment of his platform pledges. The
reduction of the tariff by which the
Nation could have an exchange of com
modities is vindicated by the exhibi
tion now before the country that our
prosperity—despite the depression
created by the wars in Mexico and in
Europe—is rapidly returning and des
tined to reach the highest mark our
Government has enjoyed since the
Civil War.
Had the old system of the Federal
bank laws remained as under Repub
lican Administrations hunger and pov
erty would stalk the streets, bank
ruptcy crushing End crumbling every
business house, and universal distress
and desolation would possess the Re
public.
"I now make bold to say that Presi
dent Wilson has never had in his
mind the selfish object of taking a
reward for the execution of taking a
iaee to the people, by seeking renomi
nation as a compensation or asking
to
day

4 *
day
met
Gust
and
to
this
has
less
more
day
body
Owen
the
in
using
only
the
not
ing
would
the
in
at
of
to
of
of
a
be
he
to
for re-election as a return for the
discharge of his obligation to his party
and hi? duty to his country.
Speaking of my own sentiments, I
dare say that if the President can
have all the policies whu-h
pledged to the people executed into
laws and could be then left to his free
will, he not only would not be a candi
date for re-election, but in justice to
the sacred grief which has afflicted
him and the sweet and tender obliga
tions which still rest upon him, would
abandon public office for the private
refuge of home, family and friends."
Every mention of the President's
name and of his accomplishments was
vigorously applauded.
4*4 , 4»4*4*4*4*4*4»4*4»4»4 , 4»4*4 , 4»
4* DEER CREEK NOTES 4*
4 , 4 , 4 , 4*4 , 4 , 4 > 4*4*4 , 4*4»4»4 , 4 , 4*4»|
Miss Regina Wyse was a caller at
Gust Schmidt's last Wednesday and
at Chas. Schmidt's last Thursday.
James McIntyre has resigned as
president of the Deer Creek Coal com
pany and has accepted the position |
on Peter A. Nelson's
plowing outfit.
Red Sharp gave a dance for the
benefit of the Deer Creek ball team
on April 10. It was attended by a large
crowd.
Mr. Fred Fillner of Etrick, Wis., has
shipped out a carload of horses which
he has disposed of.
Ted Stortz was a visitor at Joe
Demi's one day last week.
The Deer Creek Reserves of the
German Army will hold their meet
ing at Nick Theis', April 25. The
officers are viz: Col. Joseph Demi,
Lieut. Col. Eugene Stortz, Major Guy
Berry, Capt. Ted Stortz, Lieutenant
Stanley Furman, Sargeant at Arms,
Nick Theis and Color Sargeant Joseph
Berry.
There was a baseball meeting held
at Joseph Berry's April 4 for the pur
pose of organizing a baseball team
Mrs. Chas. Schlicht was a caller at
Geo. Brendell's one day last week.
It has been heard that Raymond
Libby has purchased a Case 20-40 gas
tractor and plows of Gust Schlicht, the
local agent of the Case Company
Mr and Mrs. Geo. Libby, Raymond
Libby and Orville Osmondson of Bluff
Creek stopped at Gust Schlicht's on
their way to Glendive last Wednesday.
Miss Osborne the Sup't of Schools,
visited the Deer Creek schools last
Friday.
It has been heard that Joe Demi lost
one of his valuable horses from drink
ing too much water
Mr. and Mrs. Bill Fillner took a trip
to town last week.
Adolph Stubrud was a visitor at
Gust Schlicht's last week.
Joseph Demi took a flying trip to
town last Wednesday. Everybody is
wondering why.
Peter A. Nelson was a visitor at
Milord Stubrud's last Sunday.
Gust Schlicht and Joe Bezpaletz
took a trip to town last Saturday
While in town Mr. Bezpaletz pur
chased a 20-40 gas tractor of Mr
Schlicht.
Chas. 'Schlicht lost a cow one day
last week.
A1 Moody moved from iis winter
ranch on Sioux Creek to his summer I
camp on Deer Creek.
B. H. Davis of the J. I. Case company
was a business visitor at Gust I
it.
Schlicht's last Wednesday.
Peter A. Nelson went in town Sun
day for a load of spirits. Not high
spirits or low spirits but motor spirits.
"DEER CRICK SOD BUSTER."
❖ NORTH DEER CREEK 4*
4 * 4 * 4 * 4 * 4 * 4 * 4 * 4 * 4 * 4 * 4 » 4 * 4 » 4 * 4 * 4 » 4 *
Mrs. Chas Schlicht has been giving
series of dinners to her intimate
friends, the past few weeks.
Mrs. Brown returned home last Fri
day after an extended visit with
friends and relatives in the east.
The baseball team of Deer Creek
met and organized as the "Deer Creek
Tigers," at Joe Berry's last Sunday.
Gust Schlicht was appointed manager
and Vernie Jones captain. We expect
to witness many interesting games
this summer. Success to the Tigers.
Mrs. Dana and Mrs. Shattuck spent
Wednesday and Thursday of last
week with Mrs. A. D. Moody on Sioux
Creek.
Prairie fires are quite numerous this
spring and although no great damage
has been done, still they are more or
less dangerous and we should all be
more careful.
The dance given by the "Deer Creek
Tigers," at Oscar Sharp's last Satur
day night was well attended and every
body had a very enjoyable time. The
music was furnished by Mr. Guy
Owen and Wray Dana, was fully ap
preciated by all, and we hope to have
the pleasure of hearing them again
in the near future.
If the parties who are doing the
kicking" on account of the ball team
using the organ for their dances, would
only stop and consider the fact that
the organ belongs to the pepole and
not to the school and that the young
people contributed largely to the buy
ing of the organ., I am sure that they
would realise that it is no more than
A.
get
To
the
far
ing
ing
ing
has
to
with
will
mers
to
bran
ers
I
to
right that they be allowed the u m of
it occasionally.
We hear that Paul Moe has sold
his homestead and expects to take in
the World's Fair this summer.
rug dance at Joe Berry's April 24th
everybody invited
Mr. and Mrs. Nick Theis spent San
day evening with Mr. and Mrs. Os
car Sharp
It is rumored that we now have a
full fledged constable all qualified and I
ready for business. J
Joe Demi made a business trip to j
Glendlive last Wednesday. Joe had
groceries to get for most everybody J
in the country.
'MONTANA BOY.'

4*
ROBERTS FAILS TO RAISE BAIL
Terre Haute Ex-Mayor and 14 Others I
Off For Pen Today.
Indianapolis, Ind., April 17.—Mayor
Donn M. Roberts, Judge Eli H. Red
man and 13others convicted in federal
court in the Terre Haute election con
cpiracy and sentenced to Leaven-1
| worth penitentiary, wili start for prison I
tomorr0 w in a special car.
This announ cement was made after
efforts to obtain bond for Mayor Rob
erts and the others had failed. Rob-1
ertg aga i n st whom the Terre Haute
council has brought impeachment pro-1
ceedings, was hopeful until the last
that he would not have to make the
trip. Tis sentence is six years and a
$2,000 fine.
The men were sentenced last Mon
day, but were permitted to remain in
jiail here pending their efforts to give
bonds, which Federal Judge Ander
son fixed at $10,000 for each year the
men were sentenced to prison.
FINAL LYCEUM NUMBER
PROVES SUCCESSFUL
Vociferous applause attested the
hearty appreciation of the large aud
ience at the final number of the Elli
son-White Lyceum course, at the Ar
cade Opera House, last Thursday eve
ning.
Fully four hundred people were pres
ent and enjoyed the splendid program
rendered by the artists, Josef Konecny
the famous violin virtuoso, Martha
Stenzl the well-known Chautauqua
soprano, and Mary Tris a pianist of
much more than Lyceum course abil
ity.
Konecny 's rendition of both move
ments from the finale of Rubenstein's
great Sonata in G, was a masterpiece
of technique and tone appreciation, as
was also his rendition of Ernst's Con
certo in F Minor, and the three group
numbers, the Hungarian and the Span
ish dances and Schubert's Serenade.
He concluded the program with the
most difficult of all violin solos, and |
one that but few violinists ever master,
Paganini's inspired "Hexentanz,
(Witches' Dance).
The soprano solos of Madame Stelzl,
were well selected and were well rend
ered with perfect voice control. She
was repeatedly encored and respon
ded with Tosti's "Good-Bye," accom
panied by both Konecny and Miss
Tris.
The only incongruous feature of the
entertainment was the apparently en
I forced use, by the pianist, of a player
piano belonging to the management of
the opera house, which was not only
I very much out of tune, but gave one
with a musical ear the impression
that even tuning could never improve
it.
STATE TO HELP ERADICATE
DESTRUCTIVE ARMY CUTWORM
The following letter has just been
received by the Monitor from Prof. R.
A. Cooley, the state emtomologist of
Bozeman, which should be read and
heeded by every planter of wheat
There can be no assurance that this
destructive pest will not visit your lo
cality and reduce the yield of your
wheat, and for that reason you should I
get together in your community with a |
view of taking advantage of the help
thus generously offered by the State
Agricultural College.
The letter follows:
Bozeman, Mont, April 16,1916.
To the Newspapers of Montana:
This office desires to cooperate with
the press of Montana in preventing, so
far as possible, the damage to fill
grain and other crops by the Army Cut
worm.
We believe that many crops are be
ing damaged without the owners know
ing it. An emergency circular giv
ing the most up-to-date information
has just been printed and will be sent
to all who request it. This gives
directions for examining the field and
gives remedies which we have used
with much success this season. We
will be glad to send these in bundles to
those who will distribute them to far
mers who need them.
In some localities there is need for
community cooperation. Bankers and
business men should aid the termers
to organize. In places where bad out
breaks are occurring the poisoned
bran mash should be mixed up in
quantity and distributed to the term
ers at cost.
Very respectfully,
R. A. COOLEY,
State Entomologist
PRESIDENT TOSSES BALL
IN WASHINGTON GAME
New York, April 14.— The National ,
and American baseball league began
. . * . '>1
their new seasou .««oj " *— —
weather reported from all cities.
In Washington President Wilson
was to toss the first ball. Here Mayor
Mitchell had been invited to perform
a like service. President Tener saw
I the National league game here, while
J President Johnson of the American
j league attended the SL Louis game
J EXCELSIOR MOTORCYCLE CLUB
A POPULAR ORGANIZATION
A
A party of Excelsior Motorcycle en
thusiasts, members of the "Excelsior
Club of Glendive," made their first
Nearby Run" of the season last Sun
I ^ Sidney, leaving at 10 o'clock in
(the morn ing an( j returning early the
parae evening after stopping at all the
intermediate places of interest. Bert
Butler, Jimmy Osborne and George
Smedley were riding Excelsiors and
Le» Maxwell an Indian which he says
I he is going to trade in for an Excel
sior in the near future - Jimmy Osborne
ran out of gasoline while still many
miles from town on the return trip,
and being refused "Gas" by a strange
autoist, finally had the good fortune
°* being overtaken by Dick Statham,
who gallantly helped him out.
The Club expects to make Sunday
runs to nearby places during the sum
mer, such as to Circle, Wibaux, Pax
ton, Jordan and Miles City.
OUT FISHIN'
|or goods stacked high upon a shelf,
But he is always just himself,
A feller isn't thinkin' mean,
Out fishin';
His thoughts are mostly good and clean
He doesn't knock his fellow men,
Or harbor any grudges then;
A feller's at his finest when
Out fishin'.
The rich are comrades to the poor,
Out fishin';
All brothers of a common lure,
Out fishin';
The urchin with the pin an' string
Can chum with millionaire and king;
Vain pride is a forgotten thing,
Out fishin'.
A fellow gets a chance to dream,
Out fishin';
He learns the beauties of a stream,
Out fishin';
An' he can wash his soul in air
That isn't foul with selfish care,
An* relish plain an' simple fare,
Out fishin'.
A feller has not time for hate,
Out fishin';
He isn't eager to be great,
Out fishin';
He isn't thinkin' thought of self,
. Out fishin'.
A feller's glad to be a friend,
Out fishin';
A helpin' hand he'll always lend,
Out fishin';
The brotherhood of rod an' line
An' sky an' stream is always fine;
Men come real close to God's design,
Out fishin'.
Do You Realize That You Have an Opportunity
TO SAVE M0NE1
ON YOUR
Plumbing, Heating
and Repair
Work
My Method of Estimating on a Job is to SAVE YOU MON#
I and at the Same Time Give You Better Materials and Wort
| munshi p
Let Me Give You My Price on a Water Filter Before You PI#
Your Order Elsewhere
JOHN ARLINGTON
703 William St.
THE PLUMBER
Phone
121-1
Come
Over
Down And
Look Me
I Am Selling
FOR CASH
At Prices that will Suit W
B. F. DAWSON
BÉÉ 1
it
v
,
A felfor isn't plotting schemes
•' Oui fijîhiti 7 .
He's only busy with his dre 9mg
Out fishin';
His livery is a coat of ta n>
tr* r?n thr ho*-* i
van
A feller's always mostly man
Out fishin'.
f j nidentifi

PS
«Hi
FORMER GLENDIVE PITCHER
LEAVES BEACH FOR WlSCo N
sin
Les Pire, who has been empi 0yed
linotype operator at the Advance o®
left on No. 2 yesterday for Janesvii?
Wis., where his wife is receiving t '
ment at a hospital. After a brief ^ Î
there, he expects to continué
Baron, Wis., where he will k 0 k
ployed as linotype operator on a *
a
paper
by Maurice
owned uy iviaurice Gord
remember
as a former employe at the Adva*.*
office.—Beach Progress.
Visit
California's
Expositions
Low Round Trip p ares
Daily to November 30
Three Months Limit
With Liberal Stopover
Privileges
O
*
z
*
o
See thG two greatest world's
fairs ever held—both exposi
tions are in celebration of the
opening of the Panama Canal,
the greatest engineering feat
ever accomplished. Both uni
versal in their scope.
Travel via
Northern Pacific
AND SEE
Yellowstone
National Park
Through trains to the North
Pacific Coast—rail or water from
Puget Sound cities or Portland
to San Francisco via Astoria
and the Great Northern Pacific
Steamship line.
Free descriptive literature in
cluding Exposition folder and
full details of the trip furnished.
W. J.
Glendive,
BUCHNER, Agent
- - - - Montana
SEE AMERICA

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