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Yellowstone monitor. (Glendive, Mont.) 1905-1928, April 29, 1915, Image 8

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075153/1915-04-29/ed-1/seq-8/

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Clara Kimball Young
"LOLA"
Sunday Matinee and Night
v
Opening of the Enlarged New Orpheum Theatre
The Management of the New Orpheum Theatre wishes to announc e the Opening of the enlarged and beautiful New Play House this
week, with two big Vaudeville Acts, Thursday and Friday nights in addition to the Photo-plays.
FRIDAY (To-morrow)—Two Big Vaudeville acts on the New Orpheum Stage, "THE VETERAN FOUR," Italy's Most Popular String
Instrument Artists and Singers; and "WHITE EAGLE," the Old Montana Scout in Characteristic Indian 8ongs f Dances and
Monologues; and "The Girl in the Case," a 2-act Vitagraph Drama; and "A House of Horror, a 1-act Biograph Drama.
SATURDAY:—Hearst-Selig Pictorial News, No. 25; and "The Cipher Key," a 3-act Lubin Drama.
SUNDAY (Matinee and Night:—Clara Kimball Young, in "LOLA," a 5-Act Shubert World Feature. This is one of the most remarkable
Photo-plays in the World Film Corporation's repertoire, and a Kalem Comedy "Ham at the Garbage Gents' Ball."
See The Cozy Play House in its New Dress
• *
« >
4 »
Big World Featur
THE REGULAR SUNDAY SPEC| A |.
i *5* 4 4 4
CLARA KIMBALL YOUNG
' The Great American Emotional
Actress, In
"LOLA"
à A Shubert 5-Act World Feature w
ten By Owen Davis. r,t '
:: also h
t A 1-Act Kalem Comedy, "ham at I
f THE GARBAGE GENTS' BALL,''
* SIX BIG REELS IN ALL Hi
% Matinee 3 P.M. Night Show 7*15 p L
4 . - • M, i
i
PRICES 10c and 25c.
I* -I—■** 44444 •**♦,**.* -f- •J 4 *!**^ »*« •
................................ ......................................
THE NOVICE RETURNS
SAYS TOM STOUT
(Continued from Page One)
the people of Wyoming, North Dakota,
Idaho or the Dominion of Canada. It
has as great a variety of scenery! cli
mate and people as any other "home"
of equal area on the globe. It is old
enough to have accumulated all of the
traditions that are required of the
old homestead of romance and poetry.
It is so new as to make unnecessary
any restorative embellishments such
as have to be applied frequently to
some weather-beaten, tumbled down
shack. Certainly, the most exacting
could ask nothing better in the way of
a home than Montana.
Of course, neighbors are the prin
cipal asset of any home. Any person
who claims Montana as a home can
point with pride to something like six
hundred thousand of the best neigh
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Tea Pots Given Away
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Grocery Dept.
Saturday, May 1st
ru| -L WEIGHT
^SSurs
*;
With every purchase of either
One Pound Seal Brand Coffee
or One Pound Seal Brand Tea A Tea Pot Will Be Given
fcBRAND
FREE
t
t
Tea Pots are now Displayed in our Window. Only one Tea
Pot to a Customer. Coffee Demonstration 10 A. M. to 5 P. M.
You are Cordially Invited to Attend. ,
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SPECIAL SATURDAY SALE
Dry Goods Department
65c Kimona Gingham Aprons - 39c
1 lot 65c & 75c Wash Dress
Goods - 33c
1 lot 1 and 2 inch Val Lace - 3ic
MUSLIN UNDERWEAR
1 lot Drawers 35c values - 21c
1 lot Drawers 85c values - 49c
1 lot Drawers $1.50 to $2 values 90c
G. D. HOLLECKER
Grocery Dept. Phone 12 Dry Goods Phone 112
444
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bors on earth. There are a number of
things that I want to talk over with as
many of these neighbors as I can run
across during my present sojourn at
home. There have been many times
during the last two years down in
Washington when I would have wel
comed an opportunity to step outside
and discuss with a few of the folks
home certain matters of mutual inter
est upon which I had to express what
I conceived to be their wishes by
means of a vote or a speech. Other
matters of equal interest and import
ance are to come up during the next
two years and I am going to do my
best to gather some advance informa
tion relative to the desires and opin
ions of Montana people in relation to
those subjects.
I do not believe it is possible for any
man to remain in Washington, which
is two thousand miles from Montana,
more than two years at a stretch with
a
out coming back home and yet keep
in either in the fullest sympathy with
the quickening changes of popular
sentiment in Montana or in adequate
touch with the material developments
of the state. The very atmosphere of
Washington is all against one who at
tempts to do so.
So the Novice has come back home,
not so much for a rest, as some of his
friends so generously suspect that he
needs, but for the purpose of simply
mixing around with those who have
been good to him and gathering from
them the inspiration which is so valu
able to the most talented and is abso
lutely necessary for one who lays no
claim to especial fitness for service in
a public capacity.
TOM STOUT.
Mrs. P. L. Hill entertained a party
of fifteen ladies at her home last eve
ning in honor öf her sister, Mrs. For
est Malbon of Minneapolis, who has
been here on a visit for the past sev
eral weeks. Cards were indulged in
and dainty refreshments served by
the hostess. Mrs. H. M. Hanly won the
first prize.
A large cement block, greatly re
sembling a home plate, has been plac
ed in the middle of the intersection of
Merrill avenue and West Bell street,
as a warning to automobilists that
they are to live up to the city ordinance
passed about a year ago to prevent
possible accidents on the streets. The
rules is that autos and team shall
make turns into or out from the main
street always to the right of the road,
and not to short cut as is the common
practice. Officer John Butler has been
warning autoists of their derilictions
during the past week, after which
offenders will be arrested and asked
to explain their disregard of the law
to the Police Magistrate.
in
by
the
LEADER OF REPUBLICAN
PARTY IS
End Comet Suddenly for Ex-Senator
Nelson W. Aldrich.—Was In
Senate 30 Years.
re
of
New York, April 16 .—Nelson W.
Aldrich, for 30 years United States
senator from Rhode Island, and Re
publican leader whose name was
stamped upon tariff and currency leg
islation of his party, died today of an
apoplectic stroke at his home in Fifth
avenue. He had been ill of indiges
tion since yesterday afternoon. Un
til then he had been in excellent
health. He was in his 74 th year.
Senator Aldrich will be buried Sunday
afternoon in Swanpoint cemetery,
Providence, R. I.
THE TWILIGHT SLEEP
Is
*
Falling into Disrepute With the
Medicos of New York—Death
Percentage High.
New York, April 22 .—A polyclinic
of medicos here has after careful in
vestigation of hundreds of cases, de
cided that there are too many "blue
babies" and that the percentage of
death among babies born in the
'Twilight Sleep" is too high, and in
consequence the city hospitals have
practically abandoned the method, and
it has been restricted at other mater
nities.
WIFE MARRIES 30 HOURS
AFTER DIVORCE GRANTED
Within 30 hours after her husband
obtained a divorce from her, Mrs. Et
ta Ethel Davis, 34 years old, was re
married yesterday afternoon to Harry
Clyde Eckhart, also 34 years old. The
ceremony was performed by Justice
of the Peace Ray Anderson. Eckhart
is a barber.
Judge Pierson of the district court
granted the divorce decree to David
Davis Monday.—Billings Gazette.
GRAIN MARKET
As furnished each Thursday by the
Eastern Montana Elevator Co.—
Wheat—
No. 1 Northern ................................$ 1.46
No. 2 Northern ................................ 1.43
No. 3 Northern .................................. 1.37
No. 1 Durum ....... 1.50
No. 2 Durum ...................................... 1.47
No. 3 Durum ......................... 1.44
No. 2 Hard .......................................... 1.44
Flax—
No. 1 ..................................................|i .76
No. 2 ......................................................1.71
Rejected .......................................... i.gg
Barley .......................... . .................... „ .52
Oats—cwt .......................................... i.5o
Rye ......................... 95
DEAD
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4 HIGH POINT HAPPENINGS 4
spent
Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Reeves
Sunday at Perry Dunlaps.
Farming is being done in full blast,
most everyone is done seeding wheat.
We are needing rain, but feel sure we
will get it in due time.
Mr. Wm. West, Geo. West and Clyde
Barr are up from Sioux Creek putting
in the crop on Wm. West's farm.
Mr. and Mrs. Grant Gibson, Mr. and
Mrs. C. F. Reeves attended the Farm
ers' Club on Clear Creek last Friday
night.
Mr. and Mrs. Amos Beaty were call
ing on Elmer and Perry Dunlap's Sun
day, and purchased some millinery
goods of Mrs. Perry Dunlap.
Clyde and Wm. Barr's father ar
rived in Montana last week to make
his future home. They are now liv
ing on Clyde Barr's place.
Miss Osborne the Superintendent,
was in this neighborhood last week
straightening out the school election.
It seems impossible to have a legal
school election in this District
Wm. Rust has been turning over
some Montana soil equal to an engine
He has had two gangs and a sulky
at work, this last week.
C. F. Reeves made a business trip
to Glendive this week.
We#t WM callta* on Mrs.
Elmer Dunlap Sunday.
1.
the
be
_______________* * rSL
WEEKLY NEWS LETTER
OF THE U. S. DEPART
MENT OF AGRIcu^
Number thirty-eight of the u. s . '
partment of Agriculture Weekly?
Letter, issued yesterday, C0 'H
many items of vital interest to?* Ï
ers and stock growers, among »?
are the following:
Farmers' Credit.
Three plans by which farmers I
actual practice have succeeded 1 j
proving their persona, credit^
curing loans at less than the p r l
ing rate of interest are outline?.
Farmers' Bulletin No. 654, "Howf „
ers May Improve Their p er ?
Credit." *
Prevention of Moth Damage
The various substances used to ,
away moths, such as tobacco, (Jj
plior, naphthalene cones or balls
red paper, and cedar chips, have I
effect if the eggs are already m . l _
in the clothes. Entomologists it
department therefore recommend Î
thorough beating, shaking, and t?
ing of all articles likely to at*
moths before they are laid a wav
the summer. The brushing of?
ments is especially important it
der to remove eggs which may b
escaped notice.
Our Corricdale Sheep.
Western sheep raisers have alt?
raised considerable numbers of cm I
bred sheep. In most cases ramsof&If
long wooled or down breeds have fef
used to produce lambs that m
when sold as killers or feeders, b*
a higher price than lambs of all ä® -
wool blood. In such cases the te
ability of keeping the old flock
to fine-wool blood has generally k ;
recognized.
Tractor and Horse.
The modern gas tractor of 10 or:.'
horse-power has thus far, within si
limited area of use, proved to bet:
auxiliary of the farm horse rather t
substitute. This is a cone«
set forth in a new department MÀ
(No. 174) entitled "Farm Experie::
with the Tractor." When prom
handled, according to the bulletin, »I*
tractor is often of great value in 1 #
mitting one or two men to perfof
a large amount of work within a li
ed length of time.
Trap the House Fly.
A maggot trap which will practifl
prevent the breeding of the hour
is described in a bulletin of the
partment, No. 200, "A Maggot W
Practical us ; An Experiment in Hit
Fly Control."
AUTOS IN THE PARK
One
Way Permit Will Be &*!
After August 1, Under
Regulations.
Washington, D. C., April 22.-j|
retary Lane has approved of the n
to open Yellowstone National
automobiles this summer, after Ail
1. The secretary deemed it ad«*
not to let machines in until late*
mer when everything is in read
for their admission.
The privilege is extended to ?*;
ure vehicles only, the tourist serf|
through the park being maintain^
regular transportation compand
All regular traffic will ®° ve \
general direction in making t,e
cuit of the park, an hour befo^ |
stages.
Secretary Lane's announced
ed that it was expected the _
through Yellowstone would h # 0
neB^
link to the northwest, giving
n#*
the opportunity of seeing sonie
other national parks.
GEORGE F.
PIPER
NEW agri
CULT*"'
George F. Piper, a gradi» * (
Michigan Agricultural
for some time past statione
gus county in this state, ha* ^
pointed agriculturist for ( f
County his appointment ta 1
the first of the week. ^
It is understood that in ^
the $100 per month to
new farm expert by & e
will receive additional paJ . gjdf,
the state and the govern® 0
be furnished with au * u
sides.

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