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Yellowstone monitor. (Glendive, Mont.) 1905-1928, November 04, 1915, Image 6

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DR. ZARTOON
THE WORLD'S GREATEST
PSYCHIC PHENOMENON
ORPHEUM THEATRE
FOUR DAYS
Thursday—Friday—Saturday—Sunday
November 4-5-6-7
In Connection with the Regular
PHOTO PLAY AND VAUDEVILLE PROGRAMS
A Complete Change Daily
THE GREAT ZARTOONS
ANSWER ANY QUESTION
ON LOVE—COURTSHIP—MARRIAGE
BUSINESS OR FINANCE
Write Your Questions at Home on Your Own Paper
Which you Need Not Remove from your Pocket
or Purse
Remember:
Four Days Only
Regular Program During Engagement of the
ZARTOONS
Friday, Nov. 5
M A Runaway Box Car"
(Hazard* of Helen)
'Save the Coupons." Comedy
"Ti*h'* Spy," Drama
Saturday, Nov. 6
Matinee 3 p. m.—Night 7:15 o. m.
VAUDEVILLE
TWO BIG ACTS
Young & Gilmore
and
The Karuzas
MOVIES
"An Artful Artist," Comedy
"A Woman's Mistake," Drama
"Into the Dark',, Drama
Sunday, Nov. 7
Matniee 3 p. m.—Night 7:15 p. m.
"His Wife's Story," Drama
"Foiled," Comedy
"Broncho Billy Begins Life Anew"
Drama
COMPLETE CHANCE OF VAUDEVILLE NEXT
MONDAY
of
a
of
of
LAHOMA
By JOHN
BRECKENRIDGE
ELLIS
Copyright, 1913, by the Bobbs-Mer
rill Company.
SYNOPSIS.
Brick Willock, highwayman, saves one
Gledware and a baby girl from being
murdered by his fellow outlaws on the
western plains.
Wiliock flees to the mountains and hides
to escape the wrath of the outlaws he had
outwitted. He learns that some one has
discovered his hiding place.
Red Feather, an Indian chief, brings
Willock a little white girl, named Lahoma,
and instructs him to take care of her. He
says her father is living with Indians.
Willock recognizes her as the daughter
of a woman who had died and was buried
near by. He begins to teach Làhoma cor
rect English.
The girl is taken across country by
Willock to visit Bill Atkins, and later she
makes her first trip to a real town.
A young man, Wilfred Compton, visiting
at a ranch, gets an accidental glimpse of
Lahoma and becomes interested in her.
The girl is now fifteen years old.
,7 But wEät wouTff Tracome of Brick?"
"Well, honey," said Brick, "you want
to take your place with people In the
big world, don't you ?"
"Oh, yes!" cried Lahoma, starting up
and stretching her arm toward the win
dow. "In the big world—yes! That's
the place for me—that's where I want
to live. But what will become of you?"
"Well," Brick answered slowly, "the
rock pile t'other side the mountain is
good enough for me. Your mother
sleeps under it"
"Oh, Brick!" She caught his arm.
"You wouldn't die If I went away,
would you?"
"Why, you see, honey, they wouldn't
be nothing left to go on. I'd just sort
of stop, you know. But it wouldn't
matter. Out there In the big world
people don't remember very long, and
when you're grown you wouldn't know
there'd ever been a cove with a dugout
in it and a window in the wall and a
Brick Willock to carry in the wood for
the Are."
"I'll always remember—and I won't
go without you. He could go with me,
couldn't he, Bill?"
"I suspicion he has his reasons fbr
not," Atkins observed gravely.
"I has, and I shall never go back to
the States."
"Then what's the use civilizing me?"
demanded Lahoma mournfully.
I
CHAPTER VI.
A Young Man's Fancy.
WANT you to enjoy yourself,"
went on Brick, in reply to La
homa's query. "And when Tm
old and no 'count you'd need
somebody to take care of yon, and
you'd go full equipped and ready
stand up to any civilized person that
tried to run a bluff on you."
"But oh, I want to go—I want to go
out there—where there ain't no plains
and alkali and buffalo grass—where
they's pavements and policemen and
people in beautiful clothes! I don'
mean now. I mean when I've got civ
ilised." She drew herself up proudly
"I wouldn't go till I was civilized—till
I was like them." She turned impul
sively to Brick: "But you've got to go
with me when I go! I'm going to
stay with yon till Fm fit to go, and
then you're going to stay with me the
rest of my life."
"Am I fit to go with her?" Brick ap
pealed to Bill Atkins.
"You ain't," Bill replied.
"I ain't fit," Brick declared firmly
The tears were in Lahoma's eyes. She
looked from one to the other, her lit
tle face deeply troubled. Suddenly she
grabbed np her books and started to
ward the stove. "Then this here civ
Hiring is going to stop!" she declared.
"Lahoma!" Brick cried In dismay.
"Yes, it is—unless you promise to
stay with me when I go to live In the
big world."
Honey, I'll promise you this: When
you are ready to live out there I'll sure
go with you and stay with you—if
you want me, when the time comes.
Lahoma seized his hand and Jumped
np and down in delight. „
It's a safe promise," remarked Bill
Atkins dryly.
******
One evening in May a tall lithe fig
ure crept along the southern base of
the mountain range, following its
curves with cautious feet as if fearful
of discovery. He was a young man of
twenty-one or two, bronzed, free of
movement, agile of step. His face was
firm, handsome and open. A few yards
from Brick Wlllock's dugout now stood
a neat log cabin, and not far from the
door of this cabin was a girl of about
fifteen seated on the grass.
She had been reading, but her book
had slipped to her feet With hands
clasped about her knee and head tilted
back she was watching the lazy white
clouds that stretched like wisps of
scattered cotton across the blue field
of the sky. The young man stretched
himself where a block of granite and,
below it, a cedar tree effectually pro
tected him from discovery. Thus hid
den he stared at the girl unblinklngly.
For two years he had led the life
of a cowboy, exiled from his kind, go
ing with the boys from lower Texas to
it*«— along the Chisholm trail, over
seeing great herds of cattle, caring for >
"I
of
us
he
full
girt
her
ever
^
else.
this
bat
to
bold
of
is
a
them day and night, scarcely ever un
der a roof, even that of a dugout.
Through rain and storm the ground
had been his bed. During these two
years of hard life, reckless companions
and exacting duties he had easily
slipped into the grooves of speech and
thought common to his fellows. Only
his face, his unconscious movements
and accents distinguished him from the
other boys of "Old Man Walker," the
boss of the G-Bar outfit On no other
condition but that of apparent assimi
lation codld he have retained his place
with Walker's ranchmen.
For two years he had seen no one
like the girl of the cove.
That was wonderful hair, its brown
tresses gleaming, though untouched by
the sun, as if in it were enmeshed in
numerable particles of light. The face
was more wonderful. There was the
seal of innocence on the lips, the proof
of fearlessness In the eyes, the touch
of thought on the brow, the sign of
purpose about the resolute little chin.
The slender brown hands spoke of life
in the open air, and the glow of the
cheeks told of burning suns. Her form,
her attitude, spoke not only of instinc
tive grace, but of a certain wildness in
admirable harmony with the surround
ing scene.
It seemed to him that In this young
girl, who had the look and poise of a
woman, he had found what hitherto
he had vainly sought in the wilderness
—the beauty and the charm of it, re
fined and separated from its sordidness
and uncouthness—in a xvord, from all
that was base and ugly.
At last be tore himself away, re
traced his steps as cautiously as he
had come and flung himself upon the
pony left waiting at a sheltered nook
far from the cove. As he sped over
the plains toward the distant herd it
came to him suddenly In a way not be
fore experienced that it was May, that
tbe air was balmy and fragrant and
that the land, softly lighted in the
clear twilight, was singularly beauti
ful. He seemed breathing the roses
back home, which recalled another
face, but not for long. The last time
he had seen that eastern face the dew
had lain on the early morning roses
How could a face so different make
him think of them?
The G-Bar headquarters was on the
western bank of what was then known
as Red river, but was really the North
fork of Red river. "Old Man Walker,'
who w r as scarcely past middle age, had
built his corral on the margin of the
plain which extended to that point in
an unbroken level from a great dis
tance and which, having reached that
point, dropped without warning,
sheer precipice, to an extensive lake.
The young man reached the corral
after a ride of twelve or thirteen miles,
most of the distance through a coun
try of difficult sand. He galloped up
to the rude inclosure, surrounded by a
cloud of dust through which his keen
gray eyes discovered Mlzzoo on the
eve of leaving camp. Mizzoo was one
of the men whose duty it was to ride
the line all night—tbe line that the
young man had guarded all day—to
keep Walker's cattle from drifting.
"Come on, MIzz," called the young
man as the other swung upon his
broncho; "I'm going back with you."
The lean, leather skinned, sandy raus
tached cattleman uttered words not
meet for print, but expressive of
hearty pleasure. "Ain't yon had enough
of it, Bill ?" he added. "I'd think you'd
want to lay up for tomorrow's work."
"Oh, I ain't sleepy!" the young man
declared as they rode away side by
side. "I couldn't close an eye tonight,
and I want to talk."
Mlzzoo was so called from his habit
of attributing his most emphatic
aphorisms to "his aunt, Miss Sue of
Missouri," a lady held by his com
panions to be a purely fictitious char
acter, a convenient "Mrs. Harris," to
give weight to sayings worn smooth
from centuries of use.
"I'll talk my head off," Mizzoo de
dared, "If that*!! keep you on the
move with me."
"What I want yon to talk about Is
that little girl you met on the trail
down in Texas seven years ago."
Mizzoo burst out in a hearty laugh.
"I reckon it suits yon better to take
her as a little kid," he cried, his tall
form shaking convulsively. "I'll never
forget how yon looked, Bill, when we
tried to run a bluff on her daddy last
month. Yep, 'Old Man Walker' never
knowed what a ~ proposition he was
handing us when he ordered us to drive
the old mountain lion out of his lair!
Pity you and me was at the tail end
of the attacking party. Fust thing we
knowed them other four galoots was
falling backwards a-getting out of that
trap of a cove, and the bullets was
whizzing about our ears"—
He broke off to shout with laughter.
And it was all done by one old settler
and his gal, them standing out open
and free with their breech loaders, and
us hiking out for camp like whipped
cure!"
The young man was impatient, but
he compelled himself to speak calmly.
"As I never got around the spur of the
mountain before you fellows were In
full retreat, I object to being classed
with the whipped cure, and you'll bear
that In mind, Mizzoo. Yon saw the
girt all right, didn't you?"
You bet I did, and as soon as I see
her I knowed it was the same I'd come
across on the trail seven year ago. Her
daddy give it to ns plain that if he
ever eatched one of us Inside his cove
■'d kill ns like so many coyotes, and
^ ckon he would. Well, he's got as
■inch right to his claim as anybody
else. This land don't belong to no
body, and there he's been a-squatting
considerable longer than we've laid out
this ranch. He .was in the right of H,
bat what I admire was his being able
to hold his rights. Lots of folks has
rights but they ain't man enough to
bold 'em. And If yon could have seen
in
in
un
two
and
Only
the
the
one
by
in
face
the
of
chin.
life
the
in
a
re
all
re
he
the
over
it
be
that
and
the
the
the
in
up
a
the
of
of
that gal, her eyes like two big burning
suns, and her mouth closed like a steel
trap, and her hand as steady on that
trigger as the mountain rock behind
her! Lord, Bill, what a trembly, knock
kneed, meaching sort of a husband
she's a-going to fashion to her hand,
one of these days! But pretty? None
more so. And a-going all to waste out
here in the desert!"
"And now about that child seven
years ago." the young man said.
"Why, yes, me and the boys was
bringing about 2,000 head up to Abillne
when we come on to this same pard
ner and another man walking the trail,
with a little gal coming behind 'em on
her pony. And it was this same gal.
I reckon she was seven or eight year
old then. Well, sir, I just thought as
I looked at her that I never seen a
prettier sight in this world, and I
reckon I ain't, for which I looked at
the same gal the other day the gun
she was holding up to her eye sort of
dazzled me so I couldn't take stock of
all her good points. We went into
camp that evening, and all of us got
pretty soft and mellow, what from the
unusualness of the meeting, and we
asked the old codger if we could all
come over to his camp and shake
hands with the gal. He'd drawed back
from us about a mile, he was that
skeered to be sociable. So after con
siderable haggling and jawing he said
we could, and here we come, just
about sundown, all of us looking sheep
ish enough to be carved for mutton,
but everlasting determined to take that
gal by the paw."
"Well," said the young man who
had often heard_this_story. but had
C. A. ANDERSON
Post Office address
Hodges, Mont,
itange Hodges creek
«• M brand for hors
on left thigh.
R L. LOWREY
Post Office Address
Glendive, Mont.
Range, Cabin Creek.
Right -houlderl
for hor«s and I
right ri* for|
cattle.
Right ribs for|
cattle.
Right stifle for|
horses.
VROLSEN
Postoffice address Wold,
Montana.
Range head of Deer
Creek and Red Water.
On shoulder.
Same brand on left ribs
I for cattle.
J. W. JONES
Post office address,
Wibaux, Mont.
Horse brand on left
thigh.
Range on Cottonwood
and Castle Creeks, 25
miles north of Wibaux.
Additional brand]
on left thigh.
CHET MURPHY
a
Post office address,
Glendive, Montana.
Range, Burn a creek.
BRODY BROTHERS
Postoffice, Bloom
field, Montana.
a
Range on Thir
teen Mile Creek.
Additional Horse
Brands.
ILeft Shoulder.
[Left Shoulder.
W. J. DIXON
Postoffice address
Glendive, Montana.
Range on Thirteen
Mile, Morgan and
Burns Creeks.
Cattle brand on right
hip.
Same brand on right
thigh for horses.
Additional cattle
brand:
Right ribsl
STOCKSTILL & SCHUETT
Ralph Whitlock,
Foreman
P. 0. Address,
Wibaux, Montana
Range on Glen
dive & Cedar Crk
ICattle Brand on
Left Side
A. J. ENGESET
Post Office address
Union, Montana.
Hange Tualer Creek
and Bad Route,
north side Yellow
stone River.
Horses on
shoulder.
left
Same brand on left
shoulder for cattle,
right ribs.
No sales recognised in the state
unless vented. Vent same brand
under original brand. Will nay
$500 reward for the arrest and conviction
in any court of any party or parties
found killing, stealing or branding stock
in the above brands. Will pay $200 for
information leading to collection of dam
ages from parties driving, dogging or
ill-treating stock in the above brand:
E. M. KINSEY
Postoffice, Glen
dive, Montana.
Range on Clear,
Bad Route and Cot
tonwood Creek.
Same brand
loft riba for ottU
on
never been treatedlb the seonai * ,
happened then, Mlzzoo? You al^
stop at the same place,
shake hands with her?"
Lidn't
you
The other ruminated in deen
for some time, then rejolned-% a e
know how it is. a fellow 1 ^
about the worst devilment in t<Uk
with a
.. " -----, ^ngue, but u*
him run up against somethin* et
like that and the bottom of * lmpi *
free rein and no w 0
enough to blister his ,o n(rae , " b »l
.......££
& bottom of his inn *
seems to fall out I guess thev jSK
no more to be told. That
there was to it, though i mi g ht
that the next day we come a foL?
old Whisky Simeon's Joint that
out on the sand hills, you know
we put spurs to our bronks and'wt
whooping by, with old Whisky *
a-starlng and a-hollering after us hT
he thought we was crazy i * ,
know as I had missed a drunk befoV
for five year when the materials
ready found for Its making. !
ain't never forgot the little kid with
the brown hair and the eyes that g
to your bottom layer." 8een
Darkness came on and the hour grew
late, but few words were exchanged
as they rode the weary miles that
marked the limit of the range. Th
midnight luncheon beside a small
over which the coffee steamed, roused
something like cheerful conversation
whlcn, however, flickered and fl arwl
uncertainly like the bonfire.
"Guess I'll leave you now," remark
ed the young man when the fire had
died away.
"Yes, better turn in, for you're most
uncommon dull, you know." Mizzn*
(To be continued.)
MM
E. GRINNELL
Mo""®"
Ränge. f mm Thirteen
mile to Crane creek
Cattle brandon right
shoulder.
Left shoulder®»
for horses. Eli
RICHARD KERR
Post office address. Glen
dive, Montana.
Range on McCune creek
Horse brand on right
thigh.
Cattle brand the same.
AUGUST LABELL
Postoffice address
Glendive, Mont.
Range on Cedar,
Cabin and Glendive
creeks.
Brand on left hip
for cattle.
Same brand on left
thigh for horses.
Left hip cattle,
Right shoulder for cattle.l
«
Will pay a reward of $500 for conviction of any.
one branding or killing any cattle belonging to
me.____
C. and M. SIMARD
Post office address,
lewlon, Montana.
Range, Crain and Fox
creeks.
Horse
brand
left
thigh
H. J. HASKELL
Oliver Fall, Manager.
Brand both shoulders.
Post office address,
Glendive, Montana.
Range, Iron Butte on
Cedar creek.
Additional cattle
brands:
N w|S I
left rib*
left hip
BOUCHARD BROTHERS
Postoffice a d d r e s 1
Newlon, Mont.
Range on Sears Creek.
Horse brand on left
shoulder and on left hip
for cattle.
Horses on left|
shoulder.
Cattle left ribs.■
Horses on right jaw.I
JEROME WOLFE
Postoffice address Wibaux, Montana.
Range Upper
Creek.
Beaver
Additional Horse Brandi
Left Thigh
Right Shoulder
A. G. PARSONS
Post office address,
Wibaux, Mont
Range or. Smita
Creek.
ffiL
S. B. G. NEWTON
Postoffice address. Wen
dive, Montana f
Range on North for«»*
?k.
brand on
Deer creek. , _ fijfht
Horse
th Same brand for cattle*
right hip.
W. F. DAWSON
Postoffice
M Burns, Mont
Range on ßurn*"^'
Horse and cattle Dr
on right jaw.
JAS. CAVANAUGH
Post office »id»*
Giendive, Mont*"*
Range 13
Badroute. Addi
tional horabrand
on left shoulder
I i e ft thigh.
Right rib. for

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