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The People's voice. [volume] (Helena, Mont.) 1939-1969, June 05, 1940, Image 3

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8. B. I S. B.
6 I 23
H.B.
H.B. 172
S. B. 48
H. B.
H.B. 8
S. B. 11
H. B.
H. B.
H. B.
S. B.
S.B, f 8.B. | S.B.
205 | 207
NAME AND COUNTY
H.B.
H. B.
H. B.
H.B. 28
S. B. 64
H. B.
H. B.
298
116
219
139
189
295
408
99
98
72
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55
RAVALLI COUNTY
Sen. Harry T. Martin
Rep. Stanley Antrim
Rep. H. H. Longenecher
RICHLAND COUNTY
Sen. R. S. Nutt
Rep. Roy D. Collins
ROSEBUD COUNTY
Sen. G. G. Davis
Rep. G. D. Stewart
ROOSEVELT COUNTY
Sen. Arlie M. Foor
Rep. A. T. Listug
Rep. John Zuck
SANDERS COUNTY
Sen. A. A. Alvord
Rep. H. O. Ekern
SHERIDAN COUNTY
Sen. Lars Angvick
Rep. P. C. Peterson
Rep. R. G. Tyler
SILVER BOW COUNTY
Sen. M. J. Mulholland
Rep. Mrs. Minnie Beadle
Rep. Robert C. Brown
Rep. Paul Cannon
Rep. Walter Freshman
Rep. Phil. C. Goodwin
Rep. Mike Loughran
Rep. Denis McCarthy
Rep. Thos. Ryan
Rep. Sam Spiegel
Rep. Frank K. Sullivan
STILLWATER COUNTY
Sen. S. C. Arnold
Rep. J. H. Leuthold
SWEETGRASS COUNTY
Sen. F. M. Lamp
Rep. Ben B. Miles
TETON COUNTY'
Sen. Dr. H. W. Bateman
Rep. Harry Laubach
TOOLE COUNTY
Sen. Geo. W. Wilson
Rep. E. J. Byrne
TREASURE COUNTY
Sen. A. J. Plumer
Rep. D. M. Manning
VALLEY COUNTY
Sen. Geo. Ruffcorn
Rep. Jasper DeDobbeleer
Rep. Paul Friedl
WHEATLAND COUNTY
Sen. E. F. McQuitty
Rep. L. W. Clark
WIBAUX COUNTY
Sen. W. L. Hammond
Rep. Clem Parker
YELLOWSTONE COUNTY
Sen. Tom Burke
Rep. R. H. Gebhardt
Rep. Grant Hammond
Rep. Melvin Hoiness
Rep. A. E. McFatridge
Rep. C. J. Williams
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LEGISLATIVE YARD STICK-HOW THEY SHOULD HAVE VOTED

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SENATE
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GOOD, BAD, INDIFFERENT
LEGISLATIVE RECORDS
This box score is made up of a list of progressive measures
which were acted on by the House and Senate of the Twenty
sixth Legislative Session (1939). The measures contained in
the score were agreed upon by lobbyists acting in behalf of
unions affiliated with the Montana State Federation of Labor,
the State Industrial Council (CIO), the Railroad Brotherhoods
and the Farmers Union. Fifteen of the most important meas
ures were taken for the House score and 10 for the Senate.
At the bottom of the column is a yard stick which shows how
they should have voted. Compare this with the vote of your
Senator or Representative, and draw your own conclusions.
H. B. 408 by Spiegel and Baker
A bill relating to the natural gas
distributors and transporters license
Delving into this, one of the
tax.
greatest of Montana's natural re
sources, it was found that the present
tax of three-eights of 1% was ridicu
lously low In comparison with that
levied in other states, taking into con
sidération that the consumer pays as
high as 45 to 60 cents per thousand
cubic feet for this same gas after its
tremendous expansion. It was found
that there was also an astonishing
amount of gas imported Into the state
from Canada, and millions of cubic
feet of Montana gas exported into
other states on which no tax was paid.
This bill was designed to cover the
deficiencies of the present law and
would have brought into the state
coffers an amount conservatively esti
mated at $400,000.00 per year. A vote
for the bill would have aided in con
serving Montana's resources and have
provided much needed funds for the
relief of needy citizens In distress. A
vote against the bill was a vote in
favor of the present system of looting
the state by grasping and greedy cor
porations. The vote was taken on the
motion to adopt the minority report
of the committee on Revenue and Tax
ation to place the bill on General
Orders for consideration.
H. B. 295 by McLeod, Murray and
Anderson (Cascade)
A bill to raise the tax on electrical
energy from the present 1% to 2%.
The additional 1% would have raised
approximately $160,000.00.
had been killed on an adverse report
of the committee on Revenue and Tax
ation. A motion was made to recon
sider that action and was followed by
a motion to table the reconsideration.
Those voting "AYE" were trying to
kill the bill, while those voting "NO"
were attempting to save it.
The bill
H. B. 219 by Spiegel and McGee
A bill levying a tax of 10 cents per
ton on the million and a quarter tons
of coal mined by strip mining methods
in Rosebud county by the Northern
Pacific Railroad Company,
had been killed in the Committee of
the Whole and the roll call was taken
motion to segregate it from the
The bill
on a
committee report, in an effort to save
it. Those voting "AYE" were for the
bill, while those voting "NO" were
against it.
H. B. 172 by Spiegel, Ryan, Cannon
and Murray
Creating the Montana Labor Rela
tions Board and prescribing Its duties.
The enactment of this bill Into law
would have undoubtedly had the effect
of settling labor disputes with less
loss of wages, etc., than under the
present system of strikes, lockouts,
violence and court actions. The bill
had been bitterly fought at a public
hearing, at which were represented
hundreds of employers In proxy or In
person. In fact excursions were run
by the various railroads for the pur
pose of presenting the employers argu
ments against the bill. After a lengthy
hearing, the bill was entirely re
vamped to meet the objections which
were presented. So determined were
the reactionaries to defeat this bill,
that a motion to print the revamped
bill was barely defeated 62 to 41.
However the bill was killed In the
Committee of the Whole, and the roll
call was taken on the motion to segre
gate from the committee's report.
Those voting "AYE" were for the bill.
In the Senate a similar bill was intro
duced by Senators Mulholland and
Murphy as S. B. 48. The vote was
taken on the motion to adopt the mi
nority report of the Committee on
Labor and Capital which recommend
ed the adoption of the bill,
voting "AYE" were for the bill, while
those voting "NO" were against It.
H. B. 139 by Murray
An act permitting state employees
to organize and bargain collectively
with their employer. The bill was bit
terly fought In a packed Labor Com
mittee of the House and came out
with a split report from that commit
tee. The vote came on the motion to
adopt the majority report which rec
ommended non-passage. Those voting
"AYE" were against the bill and those
voting "NO" were for the bill.
H. B. 99 by Murray, McGee and Malee
An act providing further exemptions
in garnishee actions. The passage of
the bill would have given wage earn
who had been fortunate enough to
obtain a Job after a protracted period
of Idleness, a breathing spell from
their creditors. The vote was taken
on a motion to adopt the adverse re
port of the Judiciary Committee.
Those voting "AYE" were against the
Those
era
bill, while those voting "NO" were for
the bill.
H. B. 98 by Brown, McGee and Hess
This was the Welfare Act which
had been sponsored by the Labor Un
ions of the state. It contained all the
amendments proposed by the 1 various
Welfare organizations In the several
counties and had been prepared after
careful study of the entire Welfare
situation. It would have provided for
a sufficient appropriation to take care
of all the needy In a manner compati
ble with health, decency and self re
spect. The vote was taken on a sub
stitute motion to print and place on
General Orders. Those voting "AYE"
had the interest of the needy at heart,
while those voting "NO" were in favor
of allowing them to starve.
H. B. 72
An act relating to who may petition
for a Referendum or Inifiative. The
act placed limitations upon those who
desired to circulate petitions, making
It increasingly difficult to protest
against acts of the Legislative body or
to initiate desirable new legislation.
It Is a clear abridgment of the rights
of petition. Those voting "NO" were
for continuing our present system of
democratic government.
H. B. 55 by Brown and McCarthy
Relating to the hours of labor for
The vote was
underground miners,
taken on the report of the minority
of the Mines and Mining Committee,
that the bill "do pass." Those voting
"AYE" were for the limiting of the
hours of labor of these workers to
eight hours. Those voting "NO," were
tor killing the bll).
H. B. 28 by the Committee on
Labor, Wage and Hour Bill
The Labor Committee recommended
the bill for passage, and a motion to
that effect was made by Spiegel,
chairman of the committee. The mi
nority floor leader, Hoiness, moved
that the bill be Indefinitely postponed,
and a roll call was demanded on that
motion.
(or killing the bill, while those voting
"NO" were attempting to save the
bill. The same bill was introduced in
the Senate as S. B. 64. The vote here
was taken on the substitute motion
that the minority report of the com
mittee on labor be adopted,
voting "NO" were against the bill.
H. B. 8 by Spiegel and McLain
Repealing Plan No. 2 of the Work
man's Compensation Act (insurance
company plan), the bill was killed was
klled In the committee of the whole.
The roll call was on Spiegel's motion
to segregate the bill from the com
mittee's report in an effort to save It.
Those voting "AYE" were for repeal
ing plan No. 2, those voting "NO"
were for the present system of sand
bagging insured workmen by insur
ance companies. The same bill was
introduced in the Senate as S. B. 11.
The committee recommended that the
bill do not pass. Those voting "AYE"
voted to kill the bill, while those vot
ing "NO" were for saving It.
H. B. 298 by Stevens
State Sales Tax Committee recom
Those voting "AYE" were
Those
mended bll do not pass. The roll call
came on the motion to print and place
on general orders.
"AYE" were In favor of a sales tax,
those voting "NO" were against the
bin.
Those voting
S. B. 5 by Mahoney
Repeal of the obnoxious Hitler Bill.
As originally introduced, it was to
take effect Immediately upon its pas
sage and approval. The Senate saw
fit to amend it to take effect January
1, 1941. In the House Spiegel pre
sented an amendment to make the act
take effect on Its passage and ap
proval. The House concurred In
Spiegel's amendment. Those voting
"AYE" were for repeal at once. Those
voting "NO" were for repeal in 1941
or no repeal at all. In the Senate
the vote was on the motion not to
concur In the House amendment.
Those voting "AYE" were against the
repeal of the Hitler Bill, those voting
"NO" were in favor of the repeal at
once. The republican Senators evi
dently forgot their platform plank
which dealt with this subject.
S. B. 23 by Mulholland and Pauline
Eight hour day for truck drivers.
Roll call was taken in the senate on
third reading. Those voting "AYE"
were for the bill, those voting "NO"
were against the bill. In the house
the bill was killed in the commlttee
of the whole and the vote was taken
on the motion to segregate from the
committee's report in order to save
the bill. Those voting "AYE ' were
for the bill, those voting "NO" were
against it.
Senate Substitute for H. B. 115
An act relating to the granting of
Relief and Mortgage foreclosures
(Moratorium Bill). The vote In the
Senate is on the final passage of the
bill. Those voting "AYE" were for
the bill, those voting "NO" were
against it. In the House the vote Is
also on the final passage of the bill.
Those voting "AYE" were In favor of
It, those voting "NO" were against it.
S. B. 189 by Martin
To provide the electorate of the
state with understandable Information
as to the way members of the legis
lative assembly voted. The roll call
was taken on the motion to segregate
from the committee of the whole's re
port after the bill had been killed
in the committee. Those voting
"AYE" were for the bill, those voting
"NO" were against the bill.
S. B. 205 by Mulholland, Swertelle,
Alvord and Murphy
An act to prohibit employers from
Interfering with the rights of their
employees to organize Into labor or
ganizations. The bill was Indefinitely
postponed in committee of the whole
of the Senate. The vote Is on a mo
tion to segregate from the commit
tee's report In an attempt to save the
bill. Those voting "AYE" are for the
bill, those voting "NO" are against
the bill. '
S. B. 207 by Burke
Loan Shark Bill, limiting the maxi
mum rate of Interest and providing
for supervision by the State Banking
Department,
were for the bill, those voting "NO"
Those voting "AYE"
were against It.
S. B. 4 by Montgomery
An act relating to the rate of in
terest on debts, and limiting same to
eight percent per annum,
was killed in committee of the whole,
and the vote was on the motion to
segregate the bill from the commit
tee's report In an effort to save It.
Those voting "AYE" were for the bill,
and those voting "NO" were for the
present system of gouging the unfor
tunate debtor.
The bill
In justice to Senators Kathan, Cot
ter, Chapman, Arnold and Calder, It
should be mentioned that they were
members of the Senate committee
which investigated the Liquor Control
Board, and that this investigation con
sumed most of their time for almost
50 days of the session.
SOGIALISTS NAME
ELECTORS FOR PRES.
The Socialists of Montana held their
convention Tuesday In the Labor hall,
Helena, a large and harmonious num
ber of delegates were present from
throughout the state.
The following were nominated as
S. McKean, McCone county farmer of
Circle; William J. Paterson, carpenter
of Great Falls; Mrs. Phyllis Porter
of Whiteflsh, and Harry C. Schneider,
railway trainman of Whiteflsh.
Laverne Hamilton of Roundup was
nominated for congressman in the
second district. Hamilton is both a
coal miner and farmer, he Is a mem
ber of the Farm Holiday Association.
The delegates reaffirmed their- alle
giance to the principles of Socialism
and pledged themselves to work for
the complete abolition of capitalism,
realizing that a complete collapse of
the economic system Is Imminent.
The following was proposed as Im
mediate farm relief measures:
1. That the burden of taxes be
shifted from farms and homes to In
comes, inheritances, non-resident ex
cess profits, etc., such taxes to be col
lected by the Federal government and
distributed for school and other pur
poses.
2. That the Federal government
take over all debts on farms, operated
by working owners, and reduce the in
terest rates to the actual carrying
charges.
3. That existing bona fide co-opera
tive and federal and state marketing
agencies and farmers' and consumers'
co-operative societies be encouraged
by government finance to take over
the processing and distribution of
farm products with the view of elimi
nating the exploitation of the farmer.
4. We propose that the farm prices
be stabilized In proportion to the
products of industry by representa
tives of agriculture and consumers.
In all cases, farm representatives
should be selected by the working
farmer.
5. That insurance against adverse
weather conditions and catastrophes
be provided.
Communist Party
Holds Convention
Names Candidates
Declaring that the main Issue In
the 1940 election campaign Is to "Keep
America Out of War," the state nomi
nating convention of the Communist
party selected Its four presidential
electors, Its delegation to the natlon
al nominating convention of the Com
munist party, Its state ticket and
made Its preparations for the ensuing
campaign. The sessions were held at
the Placer hotel In Helena on May 21.
The delegation to the national con
vention, which was held in New York
city from May 31st to June 2nd, was
Instructed to nominate Earl Browder
and James W. Ford, the 1936 stand
ard-bearers, for president and vice
president respectively. The certifi
cate of nomination of the presidential
electors was filed with the secretary
of state at the state capitol. The
presidential electors are: Roscoe N.
Richards of Sanders county, Mac A.
Whitten of Yellowstone county, Daniel
Devine of Missoula county, and Wil
liam Ensign of Mineral county. The
certification also included the names
of Browder and Ford as the presiden
tial ticket.
The state slate was headed by Arvo
Fredrickson, a Bute miner, as can
didate for governor, and Wayne Mus
tonen, a Valley county farmer, as
candidate for lieutenant governor. In
accordance with the state laws the
candidates for state office will not
be filed until September.
Only One Way
(Centlnued From Paire One)
sheet; and number two like the "Pink
Reporter"?
No. You're wrong, number one Is
form an editorial In the Saturday Eve
ning Post of April 6, 1940; while the
other is from that vigorous salesman
for Big Business: the weekly "TIME"
of March 11th. Of course they are
Just stating In TIME some inside facts
about U. S. finance; but how do they
expect to keep our heads swathed In
that all Important sucker anesthetic,
"Confidence" If they spit out such
vituperative indictments of the Price
System.
That quotation from the S. E. P. In
trigues me more because It shows the
one-eyed (cock-eyed) viewpoint of
Price System apologists, especially
since they go on to plead that this
downward trend can be reversed by
allowing unrestricted business com
petition etc., etc., a complete return
to Laissez-faire,
theirs Is wearing a dollar-barred lense,
set in a horned business frame and
their approach Is badly blurred and
narrowed by such Price System con
ditioning.
The whole trouble is with their ap
proach, which Is "what can we do to
help industry and agriculture, as busi
nesses?" While It should be "what
That cockeye of
do we need to satisfy the consuming
capacity of every person of our popu
lation?" From this last angle the an
swers are based on ordinary horse
sense:
We have the resources, the power
and the equipment to fill that con
suming capacity.
WELL?
6. That national, regional and state
land utilization boards on which work
ing farmers have representation be
formed for the purpose of discover
ing the best uses of the farming land
of the country in view of the Joint
needs of agriculture, industry, recre
ation, water supply, reforestation, and
so forth, and to prepare the way for
agricultural planning on a national
and ultimately on a world scale.
The convention adjourned to meet
In Helena the first Sunday after the
primary election to nominate a com
plete state ticket.
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GREAT FALLS
L.N.P.L.ACTS
ON LEGISLATION
Strong sentiment against repeal or
revision of the Johnson act, which
prevents extension of credit to those
countries who defaulted on their
World war debt payments to the
United States was expressed by the
Cascade county unit of Labor's Non
Partisan League at Its last regular
meeting, held at Great Falls. Messages
to this effect were directed sent to
the Montana congressional delegation.
"The League feels that If this act
should be repealed or revised and
credit again extended to the countries
involved, it would only be another
step leading our country to war," said
William Davey, chairman.
Support for the Wheeler-Jones farm
debt adjustment bill, which is spon
sored by the Farmers Union, and for
the Immediate passage of the anti
lynch bill were also voted by the
League In Cascade county.
At the meeting a report was made
by a committee which Is Interviewing
candidates In the coming elections
with the aim of endorsing those whose
programs coincide with those of the
organization. No endorsements have
been made as yet, according to Mr.
Davey.
Machines can be developed to the
fullest capacity to relieve much more
toll than they now do.
WELL?
In order to distribute the ABUND
ANCE we are capable of producing
our Price System and Political con
trols are entirely Inadequate; being
based on "Value and Price," which
ABUNDANCE destroys the Price
System and Politics are DOOMED.
WELL?
Crime and gambling are an Inher
ent part of a Price System set up
and must go before an effective dls
tributoln plan can operate. They are
DOOMED.
WELL?
Politics with Its Inefficiency and
waste, Its corruption and Incompet
ence must be supplanted In this me
chanized power age by scientific en
gineering controls, the one aim of
which Is efficiency and quality of
production.
WELL?
Every child should be educated for
the job of his choice.
WELL?
There are a sufficient number of
Jobs In this country to satisfy the
most fastidious; all should work.
WELL?
Freedom of belief, speech, religion,
home, and personal activities, accord
ing to one's desire (subject only to
the minimum—less than at present—
of regulation, which welfare of all re
quires) should be accorded to all.
WELL?
We should all have a voice in the
kinds, quality and styles of goods of
fered In the markets.
WELL?
HOW? We will be on our way the
very moment we pull our heads out
of the sand of our Price System con
ditioning; then approach our prob
lems with that last method of ap
proach:
"What do we need to satisfy the
consuming capacity of every person of
our population?"
This is clearly a technical engineer
ing and functional problem. There is
only one approach possible to such
a problem and that Is THE SCIEN
TIFIC APPROACH. Then with the
help of the scientist, the engineer and
the technician we can accomplish a
close approximation to all the above
outlined needs.
Personally I am certain of the In
evitability of this outcome for Amer
ica. If that is pessimism?
WELL?

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