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The People's voice. [volume] (Helena, Mont.) 1939-1969, July 20, 1956, Image 4

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Highest June Employment
Ever, Recorded Last Month
Wage earners on Montana payrolls
in commerce and industry numbered
168,800 at mid-June, the highest June
employment ever recorded in Mon
tana, the unemployment compensa
tion commission reports.
Seasonal activities, says Chadwick
H. Smith, chairman of the commis
sion, accounted for a 5,500 increase
in employment over May, and 2,000
above the previous highest June, in
1955. At the same time there re
mained 4,700 applicants for work at
offices of the employment service,
indicating a substantial, but decreas
ing, pool of labor from which more
employment will be drawn.
Lumber and logging increased its
employment 1,200, May to June,
Smith said. Construction contractors
had 1,000 more on their payrolls than
the month before, while service in
dustries had increased 1,100 and
trade establishments 90 Oin their
employment. Seasonal activities of
government, particularly in forest
and highway work, added 800 in June,
transportation and utilities 300, fi
nance and insurance 100, miscellane
ous manufacturing 200. Mining had
a decline of 100, due to metal miners
transferring to outside work for the
summer.
The 2,000 increase in employment
from a year ago, Smith said, is an
emphatic indication of the healthy
economic conditions in the state. Con
struction has 800 more on its pay
rolls than a year ago, federal, state
and local government agencies are
up 1,100 in employment, the lumber
ing industry is using 400 more work
1956 CONSERVATION PAYMENTS
ARE NOW BEING MADE
The first group of applications for
payment earned under the 1956 Agri
cultural Conservation Program have
been approved, Leo S. Kolstad, State
Agricultural Stabilization and Con
servation administrative officer, has
announced.
The group included 59 applications
from farmers and ranchers in Broad
water, Daniels and Garfield counties.
Their applications have been forward
ed to the United States Disbursing
office for payment.
Under the ACProgram, the federal
government reimburses land opera
'Free Enterprise—
(Continued from Rage One)
longer, the price of a college educa
tion will be beyond the reach of most
Montanans," he continued.
"Right now, the increasing costs
at the University units are being met
by almost continuous increases in
fees paid by students.
"This is the way in which private
colleges are operated, but it should
not be done at a public institution
like our State University.
"If long continued, this system
will mean two things: It will mean
that the students and their parents
will be forced to pay an outrageous
price for education, and it will also
mean that people of moderate
means will be unable to educate
their children at all.
"The fundamental law of Montana
was designed to prevent this situation.
When our University was set up, the
law provided that the tuition should
be forever free. This statute has now
been practically nullified by various
devices which obey the letter but
violate the spirit of our basic la-w.
"Our University system was meant
to be a tax-supported, public system,
open to every citizen at moderate
C F 11 M i
reat a s, ont. ^
Box 2089 q]
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IT IS BETTER TO HÂVE INSURANCE
and not need if, than to
need it and not have it
MONTANA FARMERS UNION
MUTUAL FIRE INSURANCE
See Our Agent
In Your Community
j Montana Farmers Union
Insurance Agency
H
ers, while finance and insurance has
gained 500. Employment in wholesale
and retail trade in June stood at
40,900 persons, the same level as a
year ago. Minor declines from June,
1955, include 300 in transportation
and utilities, 300 in mining, and 200
in service industries.
Labor requirements at such proj
ects as Noxon Dam in Sanders county,
new airbase in Valley, expansion of
the airbase at Great Falls, new power
plant at Sidney, and extensive build
ing programs at Billings, Bozeman,
Helena, Missoula, and other cities, all
point to depletion of the present la
bor reserve by August, Smith said.
Some local labor shortages, partic
ularly in building skills and equipment
operation have already appeared.
Considerable immigration must occur,
if painful shortages are to be averted.
Clerical help is already scarce in most
of the state's larger labor markets.
Opening of the vegetable canning
season in July, stepped-up labor re
quirements for hay and grain harvest
in farming areas, and the resultant
demand for more workers in trade
and service, were pointed out by Mr.
Smith as causes for concern as to
adequacy of labor supplies in the
state in the months immediately
ahead.
The 168,800 wage earners in June
is only 2,600 short of the all-time
171,400 record of last August. Last
year the employment gain from June
to August was 4,600, the year before
it was 3,800. Any comparable rise
this year will set a new top figure
for Montana employment.
tors for a portion of the expense they
incur in carrying out practices de
signed to conserve soil and water re
sources. Included in the practices for
which payment has been approved are
seeding of legumes and grasses for
soil conservation and protection,
channel clearance for streambank
protection, reorganization of irriga
tion systems, construction of stock
water and irrigation dams, leveling
land for more efficient use of irriga
tion -water and to prevent erosion,
cross fencing to protect established
vegatative cover, and installation of
drainage systems to dispose of ex
cess water. Kolstad added that this
is only a portion of the practices
available for producers to use in solv
ing their conservation problems.
Payments for construction work
performed can now be made as rapid
ly as farmers report the work is done
and the necessary checking is com
pleted. Producers are urged to re
port completion of a practice as soon
as it is finished so that the county
A3C office may submit the completed
applications for payment.
Kolstad also pointed out that pro
ducers may still apply for cost-shar
; ng under the 1956 program to carry
out needed conservation work. Ap
plication may be made at the county
ASC office and must be made before
work on the practice is begun.
cost, so the benefits of education
could be enjoyed by all, and the state
could have a plentiful supply of peo
ple trained in the various sciences and
professions.
"I believe we should return to these
first principles, and make college ed
ucation available to all, rather than
just to those able to pay an exorbi
tana cost for it," Olsen concluded.
This dinner in honor of Olsen was
sponsored by the Flathead County
Democratic Central Committee.
PACKERS' MONOPOLY
LASHED BY WITNESS
WASHINGTON, D. C.—The "Big
Four" meat packers—Armour, Swift,
Wilson and Cudahy—processed half
of all livestock slaughtered with fed
eral inspection in the nation, Edwin
F. Forbes, president of the Western
States Meat Packers Association, told
a Senate Anti-Monopoly subcommit
tee.
He said the 10 major packers which
do 77 per cent of the nation's meat
processing constitute "one of the
greatest concentrations of economic
power and real monopolies . . .
Forbes said the big meat concerns
expansion into sideline fields makes
it difficult for smaller competitors
to compete. Meat could be sold at a
loss by the "Big Four" and the losses
could be made up through big profits
on other products ranging from soap,
ice cream, margarine and drugs, he
said.
ff
Power Company
Given Rebuff
By Crow Tribe
HARDIN—The Crow Indians re
fused to make a motion at their tribal
meeting Saturday to present a reso
lution for granting of right of way
on a portion of the area of Yellow
tail Dam and reservoir site, for ease
ment to construct a power line and
substation.
The permission was requested oy
Stephen DeMers, a representative of
the Pacific Power & Light and Mon
tana Power companies.
DeMers was refused the permission,
when no member of the tribal council
would even discuss the matter.
The only time Yellowtail Dam was
brought up at Saturday night's meet
ing, was when several members ob
jected to the proposed resolution on
the grounds if easement was granted,
it might interfere with further nego
tiations with the Bureau of Reclama
tion for right of way for Yellowtail
Dam.
Burt W. Kronmiller, Hardin, tribal
attorney, reported on a tax case which
has been authorized by the tribe. He
said that he had been advised by the
Bureau of Indian Affairs that in the
July 23 bulletin, there will be a case
stating the Internal Revenue Service
cannot require Indians to pay income
tax or tax from use of trust prop- (
erty.—GREAT FALLS TRIBUNE.
NATION WILL BE TAKING LONG LOOK
AT FOOD STAMP PLAN
WASHINGTON, D. C.—-Congress
and the nation will take another good
look at the food stamp plan as a
means of using farm surpluses to im
prove diets of low income groups.
A section of the 1956 Farm Act di
rects the Secretary of Agriculture to
make a study of the plan and report
back to Congress within 90 days after
the act was signed (May 28). Since
Congress will probably have ad
journed by that time, the new 85th
Congress will have to act on the re
port.
What happens to it will depend
largely on who gets elected in No
vember. Democrats have been favor
able to the plan, Republicans oppose
it.
Food stamp bills were introduced
in the last session of Congress by
Senators Kerr, Kefauver, Humphrey,
Aiken and others. They were referred
to the Agricultural Committees of
House and Senate where opposition
by Secretary of Agriculture Ezra
Benson prevented approval. Benson
said his department is not a relief
agency, food stamp plans interfere
with profits of processors and retail
ers, and present surpluses can be
stored until needed.
RAISES FARM INCOME
To bypass the Agricultural Com
mittees, Sen. Robert Kerr amended
his food stamp plan to the social se
curity bill, HR 7225, but the amend
ment was killed by the Senate Finance
Committee.
Most of the proposed food stamp
plans provide for issuance of e'ertifi
cates to needy people, up to 10 a
month, redeemable at grocery stores
f° r food products designated as "sur
p] us » j^y ^g Secretary of Agriculture,
a food stamp plan was set up in
1949 ^ t ^ en Secretary of Agricul- I
Power Company Ads
Stray Far From Truth
WASHINGTON, D. C.— (LDNS) —
Power companies are trying to deceive
the public through misleading adver
tisements in national magazines, ac
cording to Sen. Richard L. Neuberger
(D-Ore.).
The page-and-a-third magazine lay
outs support the claims of a private
power company against those of the
government in damming the Snake
River, in Hells Canyon, Oregon.
The ads defend the company's plans
to build three, small, single-purpose
dams across the river in place of the
government's proposed single, large,
multi-purpose dam. The issue has
been a center of heated controversy
for several years.
Neuberger described as fraudulent
the statement made in the ads that if
the private company, the Idaho Power
Company, is allowed to build its small
dams the nation's taxpayers will save
$465 million.
He said each of the ads includes a
table purporting to show how much
federal taxes the taxpayers of each
state will save.
The shares of states range from
$68,700,000 for New York to $700,
000 each for Vermont, Wyoming and
Nevada.
In a recent Senate speech, Neu
berger vehemently attacked the con
clusions presented in ads, which have
been placed in at least a dozen na
tional magazines by an organization
tailed, "America's Independent Elec
tric Light and Power Companies."
HITS GOLDWATER
The Oregon Democrat also criti
cized Sen. Barry M. Goldwater (R
Ariz.) for inserting the so-called tax
saving table in the Congressional Rec
ord without revealing its "interested"
source.
Neuberger said that the govern
ment's proposed Hells Canyon Dam
would be operated as part of the Fed
eral Bonneville Power Administration,
which he said has returned so much
money to the treasury that it is $68
million ahead of the repayment sched
ule set up by Congress and the Fed
eral Power Commissidn.
said,
"Federal dams in the Columbia
River system are producing power
which puts revenue into the treasury
at the rate of $140,000 per day," he
The senator stated that federal
ture Henry Wallace. It successfully
moved thousands of tons of food into
the mouths of hungry people while
raising farmers' income by creating
increased demand for their crops.
Nearly two million families in 124
selected areas participated.
Some eight million persons whose
addresses are known to state and fed
eral officials would be eligible for
food stamp payments, if the plan
were re-established nationally. They
include 2,550,000 people on old age
assistance whose average income is
$52.55 a month; 2,173,000 dependent
children averaging $23.98 a month;
105,000 blind
$56.71 a month; 298,000 people
"relief" averaging $53.55 a month.
Also eligible would be recipients of
unemployment benefits, averaging
685,000 individuals a week last year.
Testifying March 5 on a food stamp
bill, Sen. Hubert Humphrey said, "It
is strange, indeed, for a great democ
racy like ours to be complaining about
having too much food . . . and yet
have problems of lack of adequate
persons averaging
on
diet in our midst, as a result of lack
of purchasing power . . . Let us be
as interested in full stomachs
are in full cartridge belts."
(Continued from Page One)
interested in resources are known to
be sympathtic with the general view
point of the advisory committee.
Since it is normally a group of con
gressional leaders who draft the party
platform at the national convention,
and a good sprinkling of them are
participating in the work of the ad
visory committee, it is believed that
an unusually strong program and
platform will be forthcoming.
as we
Esmcs To Bank On—
dams in the Pacific Northwest pay
for themselves through the sale of
electricity and hence do not "cost"
the taxpayers any money.
Eventually, he said, there will re
sult "a substantial profit to the Unit
ed States Treasury."
Neuberger emphasized that power
was not the only consideration in
building the dams. He said:
RISK FLOODS FOR PROFITS?
"The three low dams of the Idaho
Power Company will impound one
million acre-feet of storage for flood
control, as compared with 3,800,000
acre-feet by the high (government)
dam. Is it worthwhile to risk grave
floods to enrich the Idaho Power Com
pany?"
He added that the government dam
would also have certain beneficial
effects on fish and wildlife conserva
tion and on navigation. The low dams
would not bring these benefits, he
said.
Neuberger attacked the truth of the
ad's basic figure, the $465,500,000
amount which the ad stated the fed
eral dam would cost.
The freshman senator from Oregon
said that the official estimate of the
United States Bureau of Reclamation
put the cost of the federal dam at only
$308,500,000—or $157,000,000 less
than stated in the ad.
The senator said that even if the
private company built its dam, fed
eral funds would be used to cover
much of the construction costs. He
revealed that the Idaho Power Com
pany "has applied for an accelerated
tax write-off of about $70 million,"
which he called "an interest-free loan
from the Treasury."
Legal Advertising
»i strict cm ht op thk
.11 OK I \ I,
n Tin-;
F III ST
OF
DISTRICT
THF STATU OF MONTANA. IN \NI»
FOIl
•in i:
( Id NTV OF I,i;AVIS A
IT. A UK
Summon*
N o.
KARL AV. LAMINACK, Plaintiff.
LI/.AHKTH LAMINACK, Defendant.
THK STATK OF MONTANA Sends
Greetings to the Above Named Defend
ants. and to Each of* Them;
Von are hereby summoned to answer
the complaint in this action which is
iled in the office of the Clerk of this
of which is herewith
ii in each County
•side, and to file
your answer and serve a copy thereof
tile plaintiff's attorney within
twenty days after the service of this
Summons, exclusive of the day of serv
Mi
vs.
f
Court, a
served upon one of y
wherein any of you i
copy
pon
ice and in case of your failure to appear
answer, judgment will be taken
against you, by default, for the relief
in the complaint. This is an
action for absolute divorce on the
grounds of extreme cruelly; for mon
particulars refer to the complaint filed
herein.
Witness my hand and the Seal of said
Court this .">fh day of .lulv, 1956.
SKAL DAVID It. KEMP
or
lemanded
Clerk.
By DORIS UNGER
Deputy Clerk.
John M. McCarvel
Attorney for Plaintiff
334 Barber-Lydiard Bldg.
Créât Fall
•ST—7-29,
M fin tana.
8-3, 10.
\ VUE III STRICT COURT OF THF
FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF TDK
STATK OP MONTANA. IN AND FOR
TDK COUNTY OF LKAVIS A CLARK.
SUMMONS
No.
:o
IVAN GLEN MORGAN, Plaintiff,
MARGARET MORGAN, Defendant.
THE STATE OF MONTANA TO THE
A P. O \ r E N A M E D DEFENDANT,
GREETING:
Von are hereby summoned to answer
the complaint in this action which Is
filed in the office of the Clerk of this
Court, a copy
served upon
wherein any of you reside, and to file
your answer and serve a copy thereof
upon the plaintiff's attorney within
twenty days after the service of this
Summons, exclusive of the day of serv
ice, and in case of your failure to
pear or answer, Judgment will be taken
against you, by default, for the relief
vs.
of which Is herewith
ne of you in each County
np
demanded in the complaint. This '
action for an absolute divorce on the
grounds of extreme cruelty: for more
particulars refer to the Complaint
herein.
is an
Witness my hand and seal of said
Court, this 27th day of June, 1956.
David r. kemp, clerk.
By H. c. HARDEN,
Deputy Clerk.
(SEAL)
JOHN M. McCARVEL
Attorney Per 1'laintiff
334 Barber-Lydiard Bldg.
Great Falls, Montana.
6-29, 7-G, 13, 20.
4'!'
FRANK UR RAY
for Secretary
> ■
1 > ni. Ail w. |»:/M for T»w !•' i\ » n|< 7j\|1 1 r ra y
SituSm*. 2 , - fy. ' if.
219
■ .PFuj

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