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Great Falls tribune. (Great Falls, Mont.) 1885-1890, December 05, 1885, Image 3

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GREAT FALLS TRIBUNE.
Paliia Evetry Satur illy Et Great al, I, T
WILL HANKS, PuBLrsEm.
NOTI('E.
Mu. GEORGE BUDI.NGTON is the au
thorized agent of the TRIBUNE to so
licit subscription, job work and ad
vertising. All contracts made by
him will be faithfully carried out by
this office.
TICE - PRESTIDENT HIENI)R[('CKS
DEAD).
Another of America's great men has
left the nation and the world to
mourn his loss. The cause of his
death was paralysis of the brain.
Thomas Andrew Hendricks was
born in Muskingum county, Ohio. on
September 7.1819. In 1822 his father
moved to Shelby county, Indiana.
Thomas graduated at South Hanover
college, in 1841. studied law in
Chambersbairg, Pa.,and was there
admitted to the bar in 1813; but he
returned to Indiana to engage in his
professional work. IMr. Hend:ricks I
was elected to the legislature of
Indiana in 18-:8; he was a member of
the constitutional convention of his
state in 1850. He represented the
Indianapolis district in congress two
terms, from 1851 to 1855: and was
commissioner of the general land
office from 1855 to 1859; and from
1863 to 1869 he represented his state
in the United States senate; and his
great abilities soon made him the
democratic leader in that body.
An improvement has recently been
introduced at the Edgar Thompson
Steel works, Pennsylvania, which bids I
fair to cause Bessemer to entirely t
supplant crucible.'-It is claimed that I
Bessemer steel can be made for 1 cent 1
to 1I cents a pound, while crucible I
steel costs 11 cents and upwards.
Neow Northwest: Among other
reasons offered for having an extra
session of the Legislature this winter,
is the desirability of repealing the
salary bill for county officers. We C
doubt if the same members who en
acted the law last session would now
meet in extra session, before the sal- C
ary bill has been tested thoroughly, I
would consent to repeal it. By the
time of the meeting of the next regn- E
lar session, we believe the demerits of
the system will be so obvious that it I
will then be repealed. If not, it will t
be because experience has demonstrat- r
ed its merits. There is no argument t
to offer now for its repeal that did not
exist at the time it was passed, and, 2
practically the same . membership I
would exist.
The Philadelphia Press seems to t
have some knowledge of the Western
man and his capabilities intellectually: 1
"The Western man, portly, clear- s
skinned and keen-eyed, may never t
have read a page of Browning, and i
would not give a bushel of wheat for s
all Emmerson's primal truths, but he i,
can give you promptly a reason for f
the faith that is in him on evolution, .
or the scientific development of soil, t
or railroads, or of races, in words as I
direct and strong as bullets. The o
whole growth of the Middle and b
Western States since the war has ,
been coarser, perhaps, and less schol- b
arly than that of New England, but e
more pithy and more masculine. It is (
better suited to grapple with the pres- a
ent occasion and wrest it to its will."
Commissioner Coleman's annual re
port is out. It says one of the great
needs of the agricultural interests of
the United States is a better under
standing and more intimate relations
between the several agricultural and
experiment stations, and a more prac
tical co-operation between these in
stitutions and the Department of Ag
riculture. The colleges endowed by
Congress are separately carrying on
experiments without any central
head through which to report and
compare results. He submits that the
Department should have full and 1
ample means to avail itself of the ad
vantages offered by these institutions.
He favors the law authorizing the
Department to slaughter animals af- I
fected by pleuro-pneumonia, and I
strongly advocates the institution of (
"arbor days" in all the States.
From General Grant's account of
the Chatanooga campaign, published
in the November Century, we extract
the following: "There was no time
during the rebellion that I did not
think, and often say, that the south
was more to be benefited by defeat
than the north. The latter had the
people, the institutions and the terri
tory, to make a great and prosperous
nation. The former was burdened
with an institution abhorrent to all
civilized people not brought up under
it, and one which degraded labor,
kept it in ignorance, and enervated
the governing class. With the out
side world at war with this institution,
they could not have extended their ter
ritry. The labor of the country was
not skilled, nor allowed to become so.
The whites could not toil without be
coming degraded, and those who did I
were denominated "poor white trash."
This system of labor would soon have i
exhausted the soil and left the people
poor. The non-slaveholders would
have left the country, and the small
slaveholder must have sold out to his
more fortunate neighbors. Soon the
slaves would have outnumbered the r
masters, and not being in sympathy i
with them, would have risen in their i
might and exterminated them. The
war was expensive to the south as well t
as the north, both in blood and treas- c
ure, but it was worth all it cost." r
AN AlISURI) RUMOR.
ABrandon, (N. W. T.) Special says:
Since the execution of ,Biel at Regi- I
na, there has boeen a groat deal of cx
citement, not only here, but through
out the entire country. Ru:lors of t
every conceivable descriptiun have 1
been afloat. popular among which is v
one that Riei wa see in in person on on11
the south bank of the 0askatchewan O
in company with a person answering
the description of Gabriel Dumont, t
and .there is a strong suspicion in the o
minds of nmay that h-iel. wh:o:n the 0
government cals a "rebel" and the C
opposition a "paltroon," is now living o
and breathing the free air of the t]
Northwest, and hte who paid the po011
alty was a cl:ver and generous :sub
stitute in thoe peron of one of the o
condemned prisoners at the Regina a
jail. Be this as it mnay, there are a n
great many speaking out now, who
before the exeution were silent, and t;
their expressed opinions are that the ti
dominion government, and not Riel, s:
was the cause and effect of the late ci
Saskatchewan rebellion, and to it n
alone is due the punishment which it h
has already meted out and is meting c,
out to the half-breeds and Indians in h
the Saskatchewan district. There are e:
a large number of half-breed families to
in the district who have not a house sI
to live in, nor even clothing to keep I1
them half comfortable through the gi
winter. These people were comforta- de
bly circumstanced before the rebellion, tU
but their goods and chattles were de
stroyed by Middleton's soldiers by or- hi
der of the government at Ottawa. le
--LIEUT. ---LTZ- - IIO t
LIEUT. SCIIULi'ZS MISS s O:. m
The following letter has been ro
ceived by Secretary Bayard from
Lieut. W. W. Schultz's U. S. N., who p
was sent to Siberia last summer to
carry the presents and gratuities
awarded by congress to certain of the
natives of that country; who befriend
ed the survivors of the Jeanette:
I have the honor to report my ar
rival here on the 21st inst., on my way
to the mouth of the Lena river. My
route from St. Petersburg was the one
usually followed in summer from
Moscow, over Nishni Novgorod, Ka
zen, Perm and Tinmon. From the
latter place to Tomsk the travel by
steamer occupied ten (lays. From
Tomsk the time was unusually long,
the roads being the worst known for go
years. Owing to this unexpected de
lay on the latter part of the journey, I
m
shall have to wait here until the win
ter roads open to Yakutsk, probably
in the early part of November. I
shall then proceed to Yakutsk as rap
idly as possible, fit out the expedition c
for the north coast, and returning by
the delta, try to reach Irkutsk before
the spring break-up. Cold weather li
has now set in near Yakutsk, and the be
only practicable summer travel by
boat is interrupted. The usual visits b
with the officials of Irkutsk have
been exchanged. The newly appoint- t .
ed governor general of East Siberia,
Count Ignatieff, is particularly kind
and courteous, and promises me all
hi:
necessary official assistance in my
journey to the north. qd
The letter is dated Irkutsk, East
Siberia, Sept. 25, 1885.
--o--- a
RESOLUTIONS OF THE CATTLEMEN we
offl
The committee on resolutions of the o0f
cattle convention at St. Louis, passed oil
the following: m1
After citing the burdens of the ani- tal
mal industry as inopperative, it re- wl
commends that a committee be ap- fir
pointed to draft a bill to be submitted At
to congress in the name of the associ- frc
ation, providing for the appointment
by the president of the United States an
of a commission of five experienced an
and practical stock breeders, to whom frc
full power shall be given in the mat- me
ter of regulating quarantine and the wi.
treatment of diseases among cattle, es]
even to the extent of purchase of in- qu
fected herds. Full power is to be wi
given them to employ veterinarians hu
in the performance of their duties, the
the commission to be under the su- as
pervision of the commissioner of ag- th;
riculture. ini
THE TOOTH CAME OUT. m
Bloomington Eye: An Urbana
man tied one end of a long cord to an
aching tooth and the other end to a
heavy weight, which he threw out of
a third-story window. Two men were sa
taken to the hospital, one with a bro
ken jaw and one with a broken skull.
The tooth was extracted.
The opposition in the Austrian de
reichrath is opposed to Tiszis' bill to de
lengthen parliaments from three to sti
five years, on the ground that ballot Fi
election reforms are required first.
ara
The subscriptions for the relief of th
the Galveston fire sufferers now ag
gregate $110,000. The relief com- Wi
mittee expects to be occupied for M.
another month in applying the fund. ne
d IASIIlNGTON LETTER.
[1 -
s [From our Regular Correspondent.]
e Wasmio.STo, Nov. 21, 1885.
e QThle members of the 49th Congress
Y are arriving in the city daily. They
Sare talking about the Speakership
e contest, about revising the rules of
I the Lower House. about the Senate's
oppoition to Presidential appoint
ments, and about the questions to be
presented this winter to the new Con
gress.
While it is understood that the
Democratic majority will re-elect Mr.
Carlisle Speaker, the Republicans will
give the complimentary nomination
f to one of their brethren. As the
Member thus selected becomes the
virtual leader of the minority, a certain
interest centres in the coming action
of the House Repuclidan caucus.
Several names are mentioned for
this honor. They are Messrs. Reed
of Maine, Hiscock of New York. Long
of Massachusetts, and McKinley of
Ohio. The two former are really the
only candidates, and it is thought
that Mr.Roed will get the nomination.
Being more aggressive and more
courageous in the expression of his
opinions thanzMr. Hiscock, he is the
Snatural loader of the Republican
1 minority.
MIr. Reed is a ready, irrepressible
i talker, and spends a large part of his
tine in Congress on his feet, either in
i sneaking or in button-holing his
confreres. He knows well how to
utilize his own information, and lih,
has a sarcastic style that is heighten
ed by an exasperating coolness. Both
he and Mr. I-iscock are men of
experience, each having served several
terms in the House. Mr. Hiscock is
slow in his movements and methods.
He does not speak often, and has no
gift for shining fire of an acrimonious
debate. He is a rich man, and during
the winter givest fine dinners J
The Republican leaders are all
high-tariff advocates. All of the
leaders on the Democratic side, with
the exception of Mr. Randal, are pro
nounced revenue reformers. There
fore the battle in the House between
protection and reform of the tariff, I
promises to be fought on strict party
There is so much complaint against
the rules of the House of Reoprasent
atives, that efforts will be made early F
in the sonsion to improve them.
Congressman Springer says he has
spoen months in divising a set of rules
that will facilitate legislation.Through
the present rules the most positive
wi!l of the majority can be defeated
by the minority, and the interests of
the many subordinated to the schemes
of a few. The average day in the
House is devoted to the question
iWhat shall we do today ?" The
gentleman from Illinois says his plan
of revision opens the way for the
E prompt transaction of business which
meets the approval of a majority.
He is willing to trust a majority of
the representatives of the people.
The extent to which the Republi
can Senators will oppose the Adminis
tration in the matter of appointments
will be determined by the caucus to
be held in about a week. A Repub
lican Senator remarked. I do not
believe in opposing the President
because he is a Democrat. There are
two things to be considered in an
appointee whose name comes before
the Senate for confirmation: Is he
an able man, and will he honestly and
efficiently administer the affairs of
his office. He didpot think the
question of politics should be consi
dered. "Still," continued the Senator,
"President Cleveland has introduced
a new element in stating that he
would remove no one except for 2
offensive partisanship. To remove an
offensive Republican and appoint an
offensive Democrat in his place, is, to
my mind, inconsistent, and I shall
take that question into consideration
when appointments come up for con- C
firmation. I will agree with the
Administration when I can, and differ
from it when I must."
The President is working hard day
and night on his message to Congress,
and annual reports are coming in
from various branches of the Govern- F
ment. Goneral Sheridan's report
will be read with special interest,
especially his treatment of the Indian F
question. He puts himself in accord
with those who have contended for a
humane policy. He advocates giving
the Indians land in severalty as soon
as possible, and takes the ground S'
that the army is not the proper body to
intrust permanently with the manage
ment of the red-men.
INDIAN TROUBLES.
A special telegram from Miles City
to the Pioneer Press, dated Nov. 26,
says: "The troops that left Fort
Keogh Sunday night were met by S
White Hawk, a Cheyenne courier, on -
Monday, when within thirty miles of
the Cheyenne agency. White Hawk
delivered dispatches to Major Sny- p
der, Fifth infantry, in command, to
stating that four companies of the H
First cavalry from Fort Custer had g
arrived at the agency of the Rosebud, y
that the disturbances had been settled lo
without trouble and the services of co
Maj. `Snyder's command were not Z
needed. Accordingly these troops re
turned, arriving here today. Major
Snyder received further orders, and
with aids and a small escort renewed
the trip to the Cheyenne agency.
sThe trouble is that Pine Ridge visitors
i crowded in on issue day, wanted
rations, were again refused, and shot
into the agents house, but harmed
s nobody. They reported now, with
strong color of fact, that the Pine
e Ridge visitors have nabbed five
-hundred horses belonging to the
Northern Cheyennes and skipped.
a The troops at Keogh are all under
orders to be in readiness to march,
1 The horse stealing complication is
likely to make further trouble.
PATENTS
Obhtained, and all PATENT BUSINESS at home
or abroad attenderd to for MODERATE FEES.
Our oftica is oppoiite the U. S. Patent Ofiice,
end we can obtain pI tent. in lss time than those
remote from WASHINGTON.
Send MODEL OR DRAWING. We advise as to
rpatentability fr'e of chrrge: and we ('IARtGE
tNO) FEE UNLEI:SS PATENT 1S ALLOWED.
f W\ refer, here, to the Postmaster, the udpt. of
.Money Order Div., and to ol!ieials of the U. S.
3 Patent Olice. For circular, advice, terms, and
referernces to actual client. ift your own State or
county, write to
C. A. RNOrW & CO..
OppositePatentOffice, W.s.bhington, ").C.
NTYRTHERN ACJIFIC
1 N RAILROAD
TiHE DIRE('T LINE BETWEEN
SAINT PAUL,
MINNEAPOLIS,
OR DULUTHI
And all points in
Miiinnesota. Dakota, Montana.
ida:o. Washin lton Territory,
.British CoIlumia, PFgut SaOha and Alaska.
Express Trains daily, to which are attached
PULLMAN PALACE SLEEPERS
And Elegant Dining Cars
No Change of Cars Between
ST. PAUL AND PORTLAND.
E3MEGIRANT'' SLEEPERS FREE
The gn!y all rall line to the
YeIowsto-e Park.
For further informatian address
CHAS. G. FEE!,
Gen. Passeangr ACent,
St. Paul, Minn.
. P. ROLFE, G
e Attornoy-at-Law, E.
Special tt.ntioncive-n () land 'ntrie.. ofall
kinds ard to cn~ilaets in the l.nd olice .
U S II)ty Minl` mIr ie' rr
Hclena an..l 'r"eat alr or
dIi
Al Dupee
RANG E:South, ForkSun River. S
P. O. Address,Ilorenc, M. T.
i For Sale I
1 2 Miles above Augusta on the
South Fork
150Tons of Hay :i Stack
2000 Fencing" Poles, A
150 Hoaue Logs. H
Finest Range in the Territory.
--Price $2,000,-- S
Call or address this office.
-1
WANTED!
FURS, SKINS,
HIDES & PELTS,
For Which I Will pay the High
est Market price
.hi-p to moV.e:
Send for price list. Ii
GEO. W. GCERNFLO, Erie, Penn.
MRS. W. W. EVANS,
Sseamstress all Dress Maker.
-ATISFACTIONIGUARANT'ED
Cutting and Fitting a Specialty.
Sun River, - . Mon
NOTICE OF FINAL ENTRY.
Llur) OFFicO AT HrLNRA, MoNT.
October 12, 1885.
NOTICE is hereby given that the following
named settler has noti.of his intention
to make final proof in support of his claim, and
that said proof will be made before George E.
Hny, Notar Public, in and for Choteau
county, Montana, at Great Falls, on Nov. 28,
George C Tnnkin, who made Preemption DS.
No .25fortees W NE > N W i 8E .a.d
lots 1, 4,5 and , section 2s, Tp 29Nof R 3 east.
He name the following witnesses to prove his
ontinuoneu residence upon and cultivtion of
said nand. viz: Worden P Wren, Albert I Huy.
Nat eGin, and Joseph Hamilton, allof est
F. ADKISBON, Begister.
e
a
pOWDER
Absolutely Pure.
This powder never varies. A marveiof purity
strength and wholesomeness. More econcmica
than the ordinary kinds, and cannot be sold in
competition with the multitude of low test, shor
weight. alum or phosphrte powders. Soldonly in
Scans. ROYAL BASING POWDER CO.. 107 Wall at.,
r ew York.
OHN W. WADE,
Civil Engineer
U. S. Dep. Mineral Surveyor.
Special attention given to land surveying and
irrigating canals.
LELENA, MONT.
CHAnLES G GRIFFITH EDMUND INGERSOLL
County Surveyor
GRIFFITH & INGERSOLL,
Civil En.inuers & DeD. U. S.
Mineral & Land Surveyors,
Irrigating ditches and ranch surveys a specialty.
OFFICES: GLEAT FALLS & BE;:TON.
DR. A. F, FOOTE,
DENTIST,
Broadway, - - - Helena, Mont.
ABOVE HERALD OFFICE)
IT- LOUIS HOTEL
Anll Bon TonoRestaurant, 1
Main Street, Helena
FIRST CLASS IN EVERY RESPECT
S" Slusher, - - Proprietor.
HELENA
Phoographic Institute and
ENGLISH TRAINING SCHOOL.
ESTABLISHED 1883,
Reopened September 1, 1885
A Practical School for young men and women
COURSE OF STUDY:
Commercial, Stenography, Typewriting, Pon
Art, Architectural Drawing and Preparatory or
English
-Book Keeping by Actal Bilsiless Practice.
Penmanship and Art Department in charge of
one of the finest Penmen in the United States
Send 6 cents for beautiful specimens of his work
direct from the pen,
EVENING SESSIONS
From October to April. Tuition no higher than
in first-class eastern institutions
e"-Send for New Circular (free) giving eourse
of study, &c. Address,
H. T. ENGELHORN, or PRINCIPALS
E. o. RAILSBACK, PRINCIP A
Cor 6th Ave & Main Sts. HELENA
C'
New Barber Shop! -
Mr. Moore, Prop
Shaving, Shampooing and Hair Cut
ting, Etc.
Shop in building formerly occupi
pied by the Laundry.
Great Falls, Mont.
Dan Nettekoven,
FORT SHAW,
REPAIRS ALL KINDS OF WATCIIES,
JEWELRY, ETC
A SPECIALTY OF WATCH REPAIRING.
He has the Latest and most improved machinery
that is used in the Waltham American
Watch Factory. for making every
piece belonging to a watch
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED
Herman Wildekopf,
House,
Sign and
ORNAMENTAL PAINTER,
Kalsomlining and Frescoing
A SPECIALTY.
Interior Decorating and Paper-Hang
ing done to order.
Great Falls, - - Mont
Mules lor Sale1
The undersigned offers for sale, or
will trade for cattle
One Span of Good Mules.
For further information apply to-
ANN DOCKERY,
" Great Falls.
William H McKay James F ..'cKay
McKay Brothers,
HI ck Makers
Contractors and Builders.
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
Brick, Stone, Lime & General
BUIDING MATERIAL.
Great Falls, - - Montana
r -.- -
ad
t, Main Street, - - Sun River
Beach ey; Bros. & Hickory,
General News Dealersand Stationers
Candites,'Nts, 0oacco,5Ciars and Smokers' Articie..
Prices to Suit the Times.
GREAT FALLS, MONT.
Great Falls Blacksmith Shop,
WM. J. PRATT, PROP.
BLLACKSfllfllG ANDREPAIRING OF ALL KINDS.
I am prepared to do any class of work in my line, and in a most thorough &
w orkmanlike manner. All work done on short notice.
ALL I1SEASES OF THE FEET TREATED SCCESSFULLY,.
Livery, Druft and Mule Shoeing.
Cor. 1st & 3d Sts. - - Great Fall
Wm. Warner,
PROPRIETOR
Great Falls Hotel,
Boarding by the Day or Week
Livery & Feed Stable in Connection
CHARGES REASONABLE.
C.B.VWalker,
Sneccssor to
JAMES GIBSON
Dealer in
Hardware, Tinware, granite
Ironware, Coal & Wood
Cook and tcaatin.
ForcPumps,-Hose, Etc
Tin Roofing and Spouting
A Specialty
Sun River, Mont
GREAT FALLS
MEAT MAREET
C, N. Dickinson, .Prop.
A Choice Line of Meats Kept Constantly on Hand.
YOUR PATRONAGE SOLICITED.
____meos-oe "Et er
AND HORSE LOTHINGr

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