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Great Falls tribune. [volume] (Great Falls, Mont.) 1887-1890, June 01, 1887, Semi-weekly, Image 2

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Weekly Tribune Establi shed May 14, 1885.
GREAT FALLS TRIBUNE
UtBIsIEa DATLY AND -SIMI-.axl
BY
THE TRIBUNE PUBLISHING COMPANY,
[IoNaroRATED]
WILL HANKS, President.
H. O. CHtOWYEN, Vice-Pres.
" C. i. WEBSTER, Sec. and Treas.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES.
Mail subscriptions must be paid in advance.
DAILY. I SEMI-WS.KLY.
One year. by mail, $10.00 One year, by mail, $3.00
Six months, " 5.00 Six months, " 1.50
One month " 1.00 Three months" 1.00
One week, by carrier, 25 i Single copy,...... 1)
fAll city subscribers to Daily delivered by carrier
Advertising rates furnished on application.
The circulation of the TRIBUNE in Northern
Montana is guaranteed to exceedthat of any pa
per published in the territory.
Subscribers desiring their address changed
must send their former address; this should be
remembered.
Address: TaxaBx. PUBLISmNG Co., Great
Falls, Montana.
NO. 3525.
FIRST NATIONAL BIANK
of Great Falls.
CAPITAL, - $50,0J0.00
OFFICERS:
C. A. BROADWATER, - President
H. O. CHOWEN, - Vice-President
L. G. PHELPS, - Cashier
A. E. DICKERMAN, - Ass't Cashier
DIR.ECTORS:
C. A. BROADWATER,
PARIS GIBSON,
ROBERT VAUGHN,
H. O. CHOWEN,
A. E. DICKERMfAN,
L. G. PHELPS.
A general banking business transacted.
Exchange drawn on the principal points in the
States and Europe.
Prompt attention given to collections.
Interest allowed on time deposits.
GREAT FALLS TRIBUNE.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1, 1857.
WALTER M. O'DWYER, EDITOR.
LOWER RATES.
Reduced rates are becoming gener
al in the northwest. The Manitoba
and the Northern Pacific railroads
have just announced a considerable
reduction, varying from eighteen to
twenty-five per cent, on mnerchandise.
Although the Manitoba track has
not yet crossed the border, the com
pany shows the same .liberal spirit
here. In reply to Mr. T. E. Collins
of Fort Benton, Mr. Alexander, the
general traffic manager, says:
I am instructed by Mr. Hill to give you
rates on wool to Boston and Chicago. The
rate from Fort Benton to Duluth or St.
Paul will be $1.25 per 100 lbs.; rate via
the Great Eastern line from Duluth to 1
New York, including insurance, 75c; Bos
ton, 85c. Consign care Duluth & Sarnia
line. Pressed in bales, in carload lots,
will be able to bring it from Fort Benton i
to St. Paul at $1.05. The rate at present
from St. Paul to Chicago, pressed in bales, I
is 45c. The rate however, St. Paul to
Chicago, will probably be reduced within
a month.
This rate to Duluth or St. Paul,
which is to go into effect next Septem
ber or perhaps sooner, is twenty
cents lower than that by way of the
river and Bismarck, which including
insurance would be $1.45.
On 2,500,000 pounds of wool which
may be handled at Fort Benton in
the season, this means a large saving
in freight alone, not to speak of the
rapid transit by rail, which ensures
prompt delivery and quick returns.
Of course, the above rate also ren
ders it certain that Great Falls will
be a large wool market. Growers
from hundreds of miles around will
be able to ship their wool here direct
and thereby often save a long haul
by team to Fort Benton or Helena.
One of the largest firms in Boston
discerns this, for they write us: "We
have no doubt much wool .will be
eventually shipped from your point."
A BALBY CONTEST.
The scope of the press is widening.
It now embraces babies and may ex
tend its sheltering arms to maiden,
and widows. The St. Paul Globe an
nounces that it has purchased a lot
.in the center of the present limits of
St..Paul-in one of the most eligible I
`spots in the city, where property is
.boiiund to become very valuable in <
:after years. It is proposed to give I
this lot, free of any incumbrance, to
some baby who is fortunate enough 3
to hold the lucky number. The deed t
will be made to the parents,' who will t
be required to hold the: lot in trust t
for the child untilithbeonmes of age.~
'l itheriwghtful owner can do.withi
tash oQshe pleases. By that time a
A wil be' valuablestiart in life for
r. TherIe io harge for
Teets 'ey are free for all-who i
babies bore betweep J~anua I.
Tand August 1, 1887. The Globe fur
ther announces that the "Competition
is Open to the World, from the White
House to the Humblest Home,"
"with no baron account of race, sex, or
previous condition." This offer'is all
very well, but the Globe should add
a lot in Great Falls to make the for
tune of the baby absolutely secure.
Minneapolis will probally accept this
amendment and thus go one better.
We hope to see Great Falls well re
presented in the contest anyhow.
MM3IEJORIAL DAY.
In thousands of graveyards patri
otic hands on Monday decorated with
a- pious care the graves of gallant sold
iers who fell on the field of battle or
be died in after years at their homes.
at This devotion to the memory of the
brave men who died that the Union
might live, is a noble spectacle and
full of patriotic inspiration. More
eloquently than marble monuments
does this custom express the gratitude
of the nation to those who at the call
to arms, rallied round the flag and
bore it in triumph from "Atlanta to
O the sea."
It is fitting that the people should
thus pause amid the busy affairs of
life, to pay tribute to the memory of
it the private soldier as well as the com
It mander. Each did his part nobly and
'r risked his life in defense of the n&
r tional integrity. Each receives like
tokens of loving regard when as in
Helena, the daughters of comrades
lay plants and flowers upon the graves,
and in the evening all assemble to
hear the martial story of their toils and
their triumphs, retold by eloquent
comrades such as Martin Maginnis.
The preservation of the union, and
the extirpation of slavery with all the
' evils connected therewith, are the ben
efits which proceed from the martial
valor that we commemorate to-day.
We owe to the brave men who fell and
to those who survive, the realization
of Daniel Webster's prophetic desire,
when he expressed the hope that the
"gorgeous ensign of te Republic now
known and honored throughout
the earth," might be "still full high
advanced, its arms and trophies
streaming in their original lustre; not
a stripe erased or polluted, nbt a single
star obscured," but bearing for its
motto "everywhere spread all over in
characters of living light, blazing on
all its ample folds as they float over
the sea and over the land and on every
wind and under the whole heavens,
that other sentiment dear to every
true American heart-Liberty and
Union, now and forever, one and in
seperabie!" t
In honoring the dead to whom this E
inestimable service is due, we honor
the living. Sherman and Sheridan,
Sickles and Rosecrans, 'as well as the h
private soldier whose name is un- h
known to fame, may all discern in to- 0
day's celebrations-unmarked by bit
terness to our late foes-the undying
regard which the nation feels for
those who rallied round the flag,
"shouting the battle cry of freedom." f
.__. ___. ..p.
A1, GREAT SYSTEM.
1- The high opinion entertained of the
%y Manitoba system in St. Paul, whence
Le it starts, may be judged by the follow
g ing editorial article from the Pioneer
Press of that city:
h The vast magnitude of the enterprises
n which Mr. Hill now has on hand will, itis
said, prevent his building to Huron this
year, but neither the people of Huron nor
.e the general public need any more specific
s assurance of his intentions for the near
future than a glance at any recent railroad
map. At nunerous points on the main
i- lines may be tbserved various offshoots
I pointing in a westerly or southerly direc
tion. The indefinite extension of these
a barnch lines in these directions is neces
i sitated by the logical development of the
Manitoba system.
The time is very near, it is safe to say,
1 when western Minnesota and south Da
kota will be gridironed by these and other
offshoots of the inain lines of the Mani.
toba. They will intersect the Chicago
e lines at every important point and give all
that region an outlet for its grain at Duluth
and amarket of supply at St. Paul, many
hundred miles nearer than Chicago and
correspondingly cheaper. This is one of
the eventualities of the near future-Which
many points in south Dakota would lIke to
hasten, but which they have only to await
with patience as an inevitable and a speedy
outcome of the existing situation. Q
The next great phase of railroad devel
opment is sure to be in this direction, and
in that certainty lies the promise of great
future for St. Paul. It wilknot then have
to fight against heavy odds, against dis
criminating tariffs, for an entrance for its
trade inton region which is naturally trib.
utary to it. The vast area of prosperous
territory will find here its natural and,
cheapest. market, many hundred miles
nearer than Chicago.
Anothe "great phase," the Pioneer
Press might have said, will be the ea
tension of the ~aamtba systemn.
throughout Montana. It is not too
much to expect that the Manitoba
will throw out offshoots here, like
those which forin a network in the
mining r ion of Pennsylvana..
A so I emarr the follow -
ing a ersser t;
o l w
-widow, whose motto in life is home and
a home duties, wishes to correspond with a
gentleman of good moral character.
, It will damage Montana in the east
r to have it supposed that old and
1 young widows have to advertise for
husbands. In Great Falls where
bachelors are in the majority, no such
neglect would be possible.
SMn. DICKERSON has our best wishes
for his prosperity in Butte, where he
takes editorial charge of the Miner.
SUMMONS.
In the justice court of Great Falls township
county of Chotean, territory of Montana: Ira
Myers, plaintiff, vs. O. E. Spears, defendant
Summons.
The People of the Territory of Montana send
greeting to O. E. Spears, defendant:
You are hereby required to appear in an action
brought against you by the above-named plain
tiff in the justice's court of Great Falls township,
county of Choteau, territory of Montana, and to
answer before the justice, at his office in said
township, the complaint filed therein, in not less
than four days, nor more than ten days, after the
completion of the service of this summons. The
said action is brought to recover of you the sum
of one hundred and fifty-nine dollars and seventy
three cents ($159.73), interest included, and now
due on account for building material furnished
you by the above-named plaintiff. And you are
hereby notified that if you fail to so appear and
answer said complaint, as above required, said
plaintiff will take judgment against you for said
sum of one hundred and fifty-nine dollars and
seventy-three cents ($159.73), together with costs
of this suit.
Giv on under my hand this tenth day of May,
A. D. 1887. GEORGE E. HUY,
Justice of the Peace of said Township.
Gao. W. TAY4oR, Attorney for Plaintiff.
[First publication May 14.1
Notice of Final Proof.
Land Office at Helena, Montana,
April 80, 1887.
Notice is hereby given that the following
named settler has filed notice of his intention to
make final proof in support of his claim, and
that said proof will be made before the probate
judge of Chotean county, Montana, at Fort
Benton on June 16. 1887, viz: Michael H. Har
mon. who made Pre-emption D. S. No. 8157 for
the NW. 'j of section 12, township 20 N., range
4 E. He names the following witnesses to prove
his continuous residence upon and cultivation
of said land, viz: Herman Bicker, William H.
White James E. Walker and Charles A. Crowder,
all of Great Ealls, Montana.
S. W. LANGHORNE, Register.
H. P. ROLFE, Attorney.
Notice for Final Proof.
Land Office at Helena, Montana,
April 30, 1887.
Notice is hereby given that the following
named settler has filed notice of his intention to
make final proof in support of his claim, and
that said proof will be made before the probate
judge of Chotean county, Montana, at Fort
enton, on June 16, 1887, viz: Herman ficker,
who made Pre-emption D. S. No. 8158 for the
SW. '4 of section 1, township 20 N., range 4 E.
He names tie following witnesses to prove his
continuous residence upon and cultivation of
said land, viz: William H. White. Michael H.
Harmon, James E. Walker and Charles A.
Crowder, all of Great Falls, Montana.
S. W. LANGHORNE, Register.
H. P. ROLFE, Attorney.
Notice of Final Proof.
Land Office at Helena, Montana,
SMay 13, 1887.
Notice is hereby given that the following nam
ed settler has filed notice of his intention to
make final proof in support of his claim, and
that said proof will be made before the Probate
Judge of Choteau county at Fort Bcnton, Mont.,
on June28,l1887, vi: Paul Rumsey who made
Preemption D, 8, No. 6923 for the Wt NE?,
NE1j of the NEki sec. 27, NW!4 of the NW! sec.
26. tp. 20 N. Range 4 east.
. He names the fdllowing witnesses to prove his
continuous residence upon, and cultivation of
said land viz: John T. Eaton, Josephus Hamil
ton. Jonathan Goon and Jerry Quesnell. all of
Great Falls, Montana.
S. W. LANGHORNE, Register.
Notice for Final Proof.
Land Office at Helena. Montana.
April 27, 1887.
Notice is hereby given that the following
named' settler has filed notice of his intention
to make final proof in support of his claim, and
that said proof will be made before John W,
Tattan, probate judge of Choteau county, at Fort
Benton, on June 14, 1887, via: Grow McKean.
who made Pre-emption Declaration No. 6619 for
lot 1, SE. 1. of NE. 14 of section 6, SW. ý of NW.
4 and lot 4 of section 5, township 19 N., range 5
E. He names the following witnesses to prove
his continuons residence upon and cultivation
of said land, viz: William L. Allin, Davala Cul
hertson, Harris J. Clark and Samuel Dean, all
of Sand Coulee, Montana.
8. W. LANGHORNE, Register.
Notice of Final Proof.
Land Office at Helena, Mont.,
May 12, 1887.
Notice is hereby given that the following-nam
ed settler has filed notice of his intentionte make
final proof in support of his claim, and that said
proof will be made before Probate Judge of
Chotean county, at Fort Benton, Mont., on June
27, 1887, viz: Randall W. Hanson who made Pre
emption D. S. No. 7837 for the SEi sec. 24. tp 20,
N. R. 3 east.
He names the following witnesses to prove his
continuous residence upon. and cultivation of;
said land, viz: Frank Hany, Albert J. any, Wil
liam F. Junkin and John R. Ross, all of Great
Falls, Montaha.
S. W. LANOHOaNH, Register.
Notice of Final Entry.
Land Office at Helena, Montana,
April 19; 1887.
Notice is hereby given that the following-nam
ed settler has filed notice of his intention to
make final proof in support of his claim, and
that said proof will be made before Register and
Receiver at Helena, Montana, on June 14 1887
viz: Lewis L. Jones who made pre-emption D:
S. No. 4434, for the SB SW?4 and lot 9, section
12 and lot9, section 11, tp. 19, N. R, 2 east,
he names the following witnesses to prove his
continuous residence upoe. aud cultivation of,
said land, viz: William Negus and Coles P. Van
Wert of Helena Montana, Henry Evans and
Alfred A. Berbank of Truly Montana.
S. W. LAx..OaN, Register.
Nolice of Final Proof.
Land Office at Helena. Mont.
May 13,1887,
Notice is hereby given that the following.
named settler has filed notice of his intention to
makefinalproof in support of his claim; and
that said proof be made before John W. Tattan.
Probate Judge. Chotean conty, at Fort Benton,
on June 28, 1887, viz: Josephus Hamilton who
made Homestead application No. 2780 for the
NEi see. 20 tp. 20 N. Range 4 east.
He names the following witnesses to prove his
continuous residence upon, and cultivation of,
said land, viz: John T.. ton, Pahl F. Ramsey
Jonathan Goon andJerry Quesnell. all of Grea
Falis, Montana.
8. W. LANOHOzxE, Register.
Notice for Final Probf.
Land Office at Helena, Montana,
April 80.11887.
Notice is hereby give that the following
named settler has iled notice of his intention to
make final proof in esupport of his claim, and
that said poof will be made before the probate
udge of Chateau county, Montana, at Fort
Benton, on June 16,1887, viz: William H. White,
who made Pre-emption D. 8. NO. 8163 for the
NE. 3 of section 1, township 20 N., range 4 E.
He names the following witnesses to prove his
continuous residence upon and culetivation of
said land, viz: Herman Hicker, MichaeL H.
Harmon, Jam, EI Walker and Charles A. Crow.
der,allof Great Falls Montana.
. ; W.. .NGB.iORNBE Register.
H. P. Ilo w Attorneys.
77i
A tti Prios arc LO
_ _ _ _ :
e -SpLAMS
:::`" .I······. " ca :~
MURPHY MACLAY & CO.
Wholesale and Retail
GROCERS
and Dealers in"
BUILDERS' H'ARDWARE,
S. E. Cor. Central Ave. and Second St., Great Falls.
WILLIAM ALBRECHT,
Great Falls, Mont.
Dealer in RNITURE
Beading, Mirrors, Chromos, Cabinetware, etc.
Complete STOCK and LOW Prices.
.? LVEail Orders Solicited.
A. M. HOLTER, Pres. M. M. HOLTER, Vice-Pres. J. W. McLeod, Sec. & Treas.
CHAS. WEGNER, General Manager.
HOLTER LUMIBER CO.
Incorporated. Capital, $100,000.
.1881 Also I c onnctioll, Great Falls Plfninfg.1M. .1887
DEALERS IN
Lumber, Flooring, Siding, Shingles, Lath, Doors,
Windows, Lime and Building Material.
CANARY & SHAW,
Wholesale Dealers in
LIME
Proprietors of the Sand Coulee Lime Kilons.
Leave orders at Bank of Great Falls.
LIFE, FIRE AND ACCIDENT
INSURANCE
THE STRONGEST
Comparies in the United States represented by
S. P. PANTON,
GREAT FALLS.
Dexter's Ferrie,
Across the Missouri river at Great Falls,
both abo ve and below the mouth
of Sun river,
ARE THE SAFEST
the most complete and best equipped
of any on the upper Missouri.
Remem ber, when crossing the Missouri. to
take the new boat. and avoid all danger. Good
approaches to both boats. W. O. DEXTER.
A. G. LADD, M. D.,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
Office Heurs: 9 to II am & 2 to 4p m
Office at Ben. Lapeyre's Drug Store.
reat Falls. . . . . Montana
JOHN W. STANTON,
ATITORNEY AT LAW AND
NOTARY PUBLIC,
Will practice in all courts of the territory.
Special attention given to real estate and mining
cases
Great Falls, Mont. •
GEORGE W. TAYLOR,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
NOTARY PUBLIC
Special Attentioi , .
tlveu to Real Estate a'd Las Entries. '
BEN E. LAPEYRE,
DRU GIST
- G'reat FPalls, /oz't. .
.... DEALER IN....
Fresh .Dros, Patent Medicinis, Paints, Oils, Lamps,
Wall an Building apeir, Cigars, etc.
Prescriptions Compounded at all Hours.
DUNLAP & MITCHELL,
Dealers in Groceries and Provisions.
A Share of Your Patronage Solicited.
Cdr. 3d ave. south and 2d st. GREAT FALLS,. MONT.
J. T. Shaw & Co.
Practical Brickmakers, Contractors
axýz. "uildr..es.
We are prepared to take -contracts for all kinds of brick-work, and execute
them promptly. We claim to make the best brick in Great Falls.
ESTABLISHED 1877.
JAS. Nox ZLAN & CO.,
PROPRIETORS OF TH. ..
Minneapolis Sheepskin Tannery,
AND DEALERS IN -
s, SHEEP PELT3 FUS WOOLT
Ginseng and Seneca foot.
SHEEP PELTS & FRS; A SPECALTY .
10o lo3 . 105 Second St ENorth. F.lNIxZ a . ;Ir
Shipmentts Solicit= . . rite for ulars,.
-77
E. V. RUBOTTOM,
_HOUSE AND SIGN PAIT.-.
Graining, Paper-Hg, Hardwood mising, e
V 11rB

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