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Great Falls tribune. [volume] (Great Falls, Mont.) 1887-1890, December 22, 1887, Image 3

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DRAWN BATTLE.
GAMEST HEAVY-WEIGHT CONTEST t
OF THE GENERATION.
An American and an Englishman Fight
106 Rounds for the Interna
tional Championship on
French Soil.
LONDON, December 19.-The interna
tional contest between Jake Kilrain of
Baltimore, and Jein Smith of England,
for a diamond belt and the championship
of the world, took place on the island of
Saint Pierre, in the river Seine, France, to
day, in the presence of about 100 persons.
G. W. Atkinson, referee, performed his
duties with satisfaction to all concerned.
Smith was seconded by Jack Baldock and I
Harper, and was attended by Jem Howes
and Dick Roberts. Kilrain was seconded
by Charley Mitchell and Ned Donnelly, t
and was attended by Charley Rowell. i
Messrs. Fleming and Harding acted as
time keepers and umpires. The party in
cluded lord de Clifford, marquis of
Queensbury, Sir Hugh Drummond, Hon.
M. Sandys and captain Leicharber. An
excellent ring was pitched. Kilrain
fought at 184 pounds and Smith at 180.
Smith's castor was thrown into the ring
and was immediately followed by Kil
rain's beaver. The fight commenced at
2 P. M. and it was
A LIVELY AND ENERGETIC BATTLE.
For the first three rounds there was a 1
quick give and take, with close sparring.
In the fourth round Kilrain got in, giving
Smith a smash on the ear, which appear
ed to stun him. In the wrestling, which
formed a feature of a number of rounds
Smith was no match for the American.
He had the worst of every fall, Kilrain I
each time coming down hard on his pros
trate foe.
THE BETTING WAS ON SMITH
at the start, veering to Kilrain later. In
the 18th round Kilrain hit Smith on the
left ear, causing a swelling the size of an
egg and knocking him down. Kilrain's
right eye was closed. The flight varied
until the 15th round, when Kilrain led un
til the 19th. knocking down Smith three
times, and being knocked down himself.
Smith's ear swelling burst, to his great
relief. After the 19th round Smith's
strength returned, and he held his own.
He had the best of the last six rounds,
both men fighting as quickly and as
strongly as at the start. The referee or
dered that the fight be resumed, tomor
row, but later Smith and Kilrain express
ed mutual respect for each other, swore I
eternal friendship and agreed to consider
the fight a draw and pledged each other
to fight Sullivan. The general opinion is
that the fight was the gamest heavy- I
weight contest of the generation. Smith's
seconds chose for him a corner which
gave him the benefit of fighting with his
back to the sun, which was shining bril
liantly.
AN EVEN BATTLE.
Smith worked with splendid pluck,
took his punsshment without wincing. 1
Although knocked clean down in the i
eighteenth round, his slugging blows
began to tell heavily on Kilrain's right
eye, which became rapidly bunged up,
much in the fashion in which Sayers
treated Heenan in the famed fight long
ago. As a set-off Kilrain got well home
with his left on Smith's ear, which soon
swelled up to an abnormal size, and had
to be lanced by his seconds. Kilrain's
back heeling at the finish of each round
told heavily on Smith, but certainly up to
the fortieth round, when the men had
been fighting fifty minues, there was
very little to choose between them.
Before the fight began odds of three and
four to one were freely laid on the Eng
lishman, but all betting stopped as the
fight narrowed down to a question of en
durance. Not once or twice, but many
times it looked like
AN EASY WIN FOR EILUAIN,
but the indomitable pluck of the burly 1
Englishman, who invariably came up 1
with a smile, equaled matters. Not to
enter into an elaborate description of
each of the 106 rounds, it may be safely
said that a fiercer, fairer fight has rarely
been seen. There were cries of "foul,,'
but a "foul" was never seriously claimed
by either side. The seconds were smart
in their duty, bringing their men back to
their corners, and the umpires, Charles
Johnson for Kilrain, and John Fleming
for Smith, had few difficult points to set
tle. Hard hitting and tough work were
the order, with a concluding throw at the
end of each round, of which the long
American, who is tough and ugly, but
withal an excellent wrestler, generally
had the best.
Howv this remarkable fight might have
terminated had it been fought to a finish,
it is difficult to say. Kilrain undoubtedly
showed qualities that even his backers
never dreamed of, and had fathee the
best of the fight as they fot into the sec
ond hour. On the other hand, Smith's
determined rushes, indomitable pluck
over and over again raised the hopes of
his b
SULLIVAN'S OPINION.
In the 106th and last round both were
fighting as quickly as at the start, when
Mr. Atkinson ordered an adjournment of
the contest until the next aay amid the
loud cheers of the spectators, who were
delighted with the pluck of both men. In
Suilivan's opinion today's fight was the
gamiest witnessed in many years between
big men.
MUST FIGwr TO A fINISH.
NIw Yonx, December 21.-Richard K.
00, yvd]Qt4y aejt a message to Oeorge
W. Atkinson, referee in the Kilrain
Smith fight:
LONDoN, December 20.-The fight must
be finished. If Smith refuses I shall
claim the belt, the world's championship,
and the stakes for Kilrain.
Also the following to his representa
tive, William E. Harding:
Draw won't do. Men must meet to a
finish. If Smith refuses, shall claim the
belt, the world's championship, and the
stakes for Kilrain. Am willing to
back Jack against John L. Sullivaf
after this is settled, for from $5,000 to
$10,000 and belt.
HARDING TO FOX.
NEW YORK, December 21.-The World
published the following telegram in rela
tion to the Kilrain-Smith fight.
,LONDON, December 20.-Richard K.
Fox, New York: Just arrived. London
crazy over the fight. Battle greatest on
record. Kilrain strongest at finish. Kil
rain pronounced the best fighter ever
seen in England. Conceded he would
have won, only darkness ended the bat
tle. What about stakes? Wire Atkinson
immediately. Signed, HARDING.
FOX TO KILRAIN.
This went to Kilrain:
Jack Kilrain, champion of the world,
London: My warmest congratulations on
your great fight. The press and public
all do honor to the American champion,
and hail you champion of the world.
Will back you against any man in the
world for from $2,000 to $10,000. Signed,
RICHARD K. Fox.
JOHN WANTS TO FIGHT.
LONDON, December 21.-John L. Sulli
van has issued a challenge to Smith or
Kilrain for $5,000 a side.
What Dempsey Says.
NEW YORK, December 19. - When
Jack Dempsey walked into the office of
the Police Gazette the other day to re
ceive his check for $2,000 and the dia
mond-studded belt, no one would have
supposed that he had fought a battle of
forty-five rounds with so good a man as
Jack Reagan the day previous. There
was not a mark on his face. He limped
slightly from the spurring inflicted by a
spike in the toe of Reagan's shoes. Mr.
Fox handed Dempsey $2,000 and a box
containing Kilrain's colors with the re
mark:
"Well, Jack, I hope Kilrain will do as
well as you did."
" It was a pretty hard fight," said
Dempsey, "and though I do not think
that Reagan is any match for me, you
can bet he is a game man. The way I
was spiked was outrageous. Reagan, in
stead of wearing the spikes in his shoes
about an inch from the sides and toward
the ball of his foot, had one of the
spikes right under his big toe. He spiked
me twice. The second round he spiked
me, tearing the tendons right out of my
leg, and the shock was so great that it ran
right up the cord of my neck. It was a
deliberate, intentional foul."
Frank Stevenson said he did not be
lieve that the spiking was intentional on
Reagan's part. Reagan had a way of
stepping forward and throwing out his
left foot. If any one was to blame it was
the man who ordered his shoes for him.
Sullivan's Backers.
In the Sullivan-Mitchell matter it is
imagined by a great many knowing ones
that Mitchell knew what he was doing
in making the match, and that Sullivan
will not be allowed to win. The stake
holder is Chippy Norton-the bookmaker
who cut the ropes in the Smith-Green.
field fight, and who was followed by a
Birmingham gang that used knives and
brass knuckles to help Greenfield. Sulli
van is not worried, however. One of ten
men who are to be on his side is a genial
former Texan sheriff, who has shot four
men and is prepared to show any Birm
ingham tough that there is an American
institution that beats knife and knuckle
duster hollow. The other nine men will
be picked fighters, and all will go armn ed
and ready to handle any ten Englishmen
whom the other side may bring.-Ex
change.
Retaliation on Iowa.
CHICAGO, December 20.-Considerable
stir has been caused here by the fact leak
ing out that the Keeley Brewing company
has instructed its brokers to buy no bar
lay grown in or shipped from the states
of Iowa or Kansas. The secretary of the
company says: "If they won't buy our
beer it is quite proper that we should not
buy their barley." Louis Huck, a million
aire malster, said if there was a general
movement he would join it heartily. He
declared the farmers of Iowa were hypo
crites, pretending to believe in prohibition
and at the same time are raising barley
for the nianufacture of whiskey and beer.
Appointed.
WAsaHINTON, December 20.-Secretary
Fairchild decided to appoint Percy C.
Smith, of New Jersey, as chief of the
appointment division of the treasury
department in place of Eugene Higgins,
resigned. Mr. Smith is a cousin of the
secretary, and holds the position of dis
bursing clerk of the postof ice depart
ment, and was personally complimented
for his business capacity by the post
master general in his last annual report.
He will relieve Mr. Higgins in January.
Slaughtered in Kentucky.
WINCHESTER, Kentucky, December 19.
-The fued between the Adams and Cas
well factions broke out again last Sunday
night in Rock Castle county, when after
church services Frank Adams was killed
by one of the Caswells. Since then Frank
Haselton, James Lansford, James Town
send, Tom Jackson, and two others, names
unknown, have beenkilled. Many others
have been wounded and several houses
have been burned.
A 'Good Appoihntment.
WASHINGTON, December 19.-The pres
ident has decided to appoint Stephen A.
DeWolfe of Butte to be an associate
justice of the supreme court of Montana
in place of Judge Galbraith, whose term
has expired.
A Wild Career Ended.
KansisA CrI, Missouri, December 21.
-Sands W. Hopkins4 28 years of a
died here redcently from the efecta
laudapoun , tke l n o it is Wi
ionable boarding house here in the pres
ence of two young women. He had
achieved considerable notriety both here
and in other parts of the country by his
reckless and eccentric conduct, most of
his exploits being in the nature of the
lavish expenditure of money. He in
herited a large fortune some years ago,
and has been conspicuous before the
public ever since. A short time ago he
went to New York on his way to Europe,
and while there had some difficully,
which gave rise to a widely circulated
newspaper report that he had engaged at
a considerable salary a pugilist to accom
pany him on his travels, and to punish
anyone who gained his ill will. He had
been drinking heavily for several days
before his death. In 1882, while hand
ling a shot gun, it accidentally exploded,
and the contents struck his wife, ter rng
her head to pieces. A singular feature of
this tragedy was that Mrs. Hopkins was
reading the novel "A Day of Fate," when
she was killed. Since that time Hopkins
led a wild life.
Sam Randall Firm.
WAsmHINGTO, December 20.-Sam Ran
dall, on being approached by a free trade
democrat with the question: "Would you
make any concession to be made chair
man of the ways and means committee,"
Randall looked at him about a minute
with one of his scowls and replied: " I
thought you knew me too well to ask a
question of that kind. No, sir, I would
not compromise my principals to be made
president," and turning on his heels he
left.
OYAL!I
POWDER'
Absolutely Pure.
This Powder never varies. A marvel of
purity than the ordinary kinds, and cannot
be sold in competition with the multitude
of low test, short weight, alum or phos
phate powders. Sold only in cans.
ROYAL BAKING POWDER Co.,
107 Wall street, New York.
Great Falls Boot and Shoe Shop.
BOOTS Ano SHOES
Made to order in any and every
style. All work warranted.
REPAIRING NEATLY PERFORMED.
A. C, BROWN,
Third Street, near First-av. South, Great Falls.
F ADKINSON,
Attorney at Law.
Gives special attention to business in the
United States land office. Office: Helena, Mont.
J. D. McINTIRE, CHAS. MOINTIBE,
Chief Engineer Sun R. Canal. Co. Surveyor
M clNTIRE BROS.,
SURVEYORS.
GBEAT FALLS. - - - MONTANA
BERT HUY,
Architect.
GREAT FALLS, MONT.
DR. R. F. FOOTE,
DENTIST,
Broadway, - - ena, Mont
(ABOVE HERALD OFFICE)
200 CHOPPERS
WANTEDI
200 Wood Choppers and
Teamsters can find employ
ment for one or two years.
Good timber and good prices.
Apply to ANACONDA FLUM
ING CO., Anaconda, Montana.
Notice for Final Entry.
U. 8. Land Offce, e len. Montan..
Notice is hereby_ qluven that the following
named settler has iled notice of his intention to
make final proof in support of his claim, and
that said prof will be made .before the
Probate Juge of C:ascade county. Montana,
SatGreat Falls Montana. ona December 21. 1f t,
I v.: Richard Graham, wo mads pre4mption D.
•. No. 75r for the Nl of theiýf- ee. 5,i
S. of the 8E,.and Wof theBE sec.2,tp.
20NI R F 3 . .
Hnames thie following witnessesttoprOyA his
continudcs residence upon, and ealtirationof
said lad, '-: James . Ea is, enry Fit'
gerald Da~vi Thomas and Whitman . Toneas,
W,"bL;atAa-, d ýi,~
READY FOR BUSINESS
Between Great Falls, Fort BBnton, Assinni
boine, Dawes and other Montana points,
and Grand Forks. Fergus Falls. Fargo,
Watertown, Aberdeen, Ellendale,
St. Paul, Minneapolis, and
ALL POINTS EAST AND SOUTH
Through Sleeper between Great
Falls and St. Paul.
We are now prepared to handle all
kinds of freight. Stock Yards have been
completed at Great Falls, Benton, Big
Sandy, Beaverton, Poplar, Montana
Buford, Towner, Minot, Dakota; and
Crookston, Minnesota-containing all
the latest srum improve
ments. "* "U.O,- Good
wat er M AN OBA and hay
Our ex- d*i' cellent
Roadway and Equipment, with light
grades, 7has made our lowest average
time on stock trains 201 miles per hour.
AWlates always as Low as the Lowest.
If you are going East or South, send to
our nearest Agent, or the undersigned,
for rates and other information, which
will be cheerfully furnished.
A. L. MoHLSR, C. H. WARREN,
Gen'l Frt. Agent. Gen'1 Pass. Agents
W. S. ALEXANDER, A. MANVEL,
Gea'I Trafc Manager. Gen' Manages.
ST. PAUL. MINN.
ý FAST MAIL
EAST
It is the only line running Pullman
Drawing-Room Sleeping Cars with
Luxurious Smoking Rooms, and the
Finest Dining Cars in the World, via
the famous. "River Bank Route,"
along the shores of Lake Pepin and
the beautiful Mississippi River to Mil
waukee and Chicago. It has four di
rect routes of its own between St.
Paul and Chicago, and it runs two
fast Express Trains daily between
those points, via its Short Line, on
which all classes of tickets are hon
ored. Look at the map and observe
the time tables, and then go to the
nearest ticket office and ask for your
icket over the Chicago, Milwaukee &
St. Paul Railway and thus secure the
very best accommodations to be had
for your money, as this Company runs
none but the finest trains, over the
most perfect tracks, through the most
populous towns and villages, and in
the midst of pastoral and picturesque
scenery, making Quick Time and Sure
Connections in Union Depots. No
change of cars of any class between
St. Paul and Chicago. For through
tickets, time tables and full informa
tion, apply to any coupon ticket agent
in the Northwest. R. Miller, Gen'l
Manager; J. F. Tucker, Ass't Gen'l
Manager; A. V.'H. Carpenter, Gen'l
Pass. and Tk't Agt.; Gee. H. Heaf
ford, Ass't Gen'l Pass. and Tk't Ag't.,
Milwaukee, Wis.; W. H. Dixon, Ass't
Gen'l Pass. Ag't.; F. B. Ross, Travel
ing Pass. Ag't, St. Paul, Minn.
0ýý t4LRO
,"he BIulin.gn"
THE PRINCIPAL LINE BETWEEN THE
NORTHWEST
AND ALL POINTS IN THE
UNITED STATES AND OANADA.
@NNECTONS MADE IN UNION DEPOTS
AT ALL
BUSINESS (ENTERS
PEERLESS DINING CARS
AND PULLMAN'S SLEEPERS
ON ALL THROUGH TRAINS BETWEEN
,e 's PAL.i' CHICAGO,"0ST.LOUIS
* THEONLYLINE *
RUNNING DINING CARS BETWEEN
THE TWIN CITIES Apo ST. Louis
FOR TKETS, RATES, GENERAL INFORMATION, ETC.,
CALL ON ANY TICKET AGENT IN THE UNITE ISTATESOR CARADA
OR ADGRESS
O.. H. ARRIS, W. J. C. KENYON,
GREEM*. MANMGEr, esn*L PAM. AGaT,
ST. PAUL, MINN.
A. C. BHELDON, General Agent, 2i Wash
ilnon atreet. Portland, Oregon.
H.T. Bed RAN, Live Stook Agent, 8C Pen!,
GO EAST
VIA
The Northern Pacific Railroad.
TheiDinlng Oar Route
And Great Short Line to Ealistern Chites
Il H UiLE8 THE SHORTEST iOUTE
To Chicago and allPoeient .E.
oNLY THROUGH CAR LINE.
LOW RATES!
QUICK TIME!
PALACE CAR!
TI ME TABLE FROM HELENA.
Trnin aniree 'frm seat, Psaift: E ptre*sw gee
wee , Atlan*e iOam
west, Pacilo tm
FoUr f intermaton ead Is
C.. FEE, A. L
[email protected]~ Stra s a itis
One Car - Load Just Received
(First Premium at Centennial, 1876.)
A POSITIVE PROTECTION rFROM MAKES THE SAFEST AND BEST
LAMP EXPLOSIONS. L..I.ST KNOWN
MILLION GALLONS ELAINE O
Sold in II Years. ELAINE cannot be improved upon.
Warden & Oxnard, Menufacturer, Pittsburgh, Pa.
AT
J. H. McKNIGHT P CO'S.
SPECIAL PRICES ON ROUND LOTS.
THE PARK HOTEL,
(Under New Management.)
The Only First-Class House in Fine Billiard - Room and Bar
Great Falls. Stocked with
OFFICE OPEN DAY AND NIGHT CHOICE LIQUORS AND CIGARS
Central Avenue and Park Drive.
PARK HOTEL CO., Proprietor.
Grand Union Hotel,
ý'ort senLton , .Cont.
--Only First-Class Hotel in the City-
Rates 12.00 per Day and Upwards. Special Rates to Families.
Sample Rooms for Commercial Men
Only Fire-Proof Hotel in Northern Montana.
First-Class Bar and Billiard Room in Connection.
SAM KOHLBERG, Prop.
WILLIAM H. McKAY. JAMES F. McKAY.
McKAY BROS.
Bricimakers, Contractors, Builders,
and Wholesale and Retail Dealers in Brick. Stone, Lime,
and Building Material,
Great Falls, Montana.
First National Bank
OF HELENA, MONT.
Paid-Up Capital - $500,000 i Surplus and Profits - $300,000
Individual Deposits $2,300,000 1 Government Deposits 100,000
S. T. HAUSER, President, A. J. DAVIS, Vice-President
E. W. KNIGHT, Cashier. T. H. KLEINSCHMIDT, Ass't-Cash.
.ASSOOIATE BAN~rcS:
FIRST NATIONAL, Fort Benton, Montana,
MISSOULA NATIONAL, Missoula, Montana.
FIRST NATIONAL, Butte, Montana.
A General Banking Business Transacted.
First National Bank W. G. Conrad, - -President
CW. E. Conrad, - Vice-President
OF FORT BENTON. Jos. A. Baker, - Cashier
Capital and Surplus, $175,000.
We are prepared to make Loans at Cheaper Rates than any Montana Bank.
Fine Merchant Tailoring
Special Attention to Mail Orders. Samples Sent on Application.
JAS. W. BARKER,
MAIN STREET,
HELENA, - - - MONTANA.
WINES, LIQUORS, CIGARS
MJII1V PFIRST-AVENUE SOUTH,
J GREAT FALLS, - MONTANA.
HORSES FOR SiLE
Well-Broken Work, Saddle and Driving Horses.
P. O. Address: Truly, Montana. CHAS. BREWSTER.
Range: Smith River. 5.i ow
BACH, IRY & CO.
(LMITrED.)
Helena, Montana.
The Only Wholesale Grocers in Montana.
Carry the Largest sad most CompleteStock.
8 end -tbr " our Pri.eBisE i, o-a .s 8g
1864 E- TBLISHED 1864. 1 888
.AJWACTURER SND DEALI3R IN
Carriages, Material, and Cumberland
PAINTING ANDh TRIMNGO
;j~ ~ ~ ·-;·1 N4·- A"

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