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Great Falls tribune. (Great Falls, Mont.) 1887-1890, May 29, 1889, Semi-weekly Edition, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075239/1889-05-29/ed-1/seq-4/

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A HANDSOME MONUMENT.
ERECTED OVER CHESTER A. AR
THUR'S GRAVE ON THE HUDSON.
Blmral Places of the Presidents of the
United States-The Family Plot of the
Arthurs, Mod the Inscriptions Over Their
Tomib-The Arthur Memorial.
The graves of five of the presidents of
the United States are in Virginia; those
of Washington, Jefferson, Madison, Mon
roe and Tyler. Four of the presidents,
Grant, Fillmore, Van Buren and Arthur,
are buried in the soil of New York;
three of them, Jackson, Johnson and
Polk, in Tennessee; the two Adamses
repose in Massachusetts, Ohio has the
graves of the elder Harrison and Gar
field, Illinois guards the tomb of Lin
coln, Franklin Pierce lies in the Granite
state of New Hampshire, Buchanan in
Pennsylvania and Taylor in Kentucky.
FRONT vIEW OF ARTHUR'S MONUMENT,
Of the four presidential graves in New
York state those of Arthur, Van Buren
and Grant are in the valley of the Hud
son. The ebb and flow of the sea passes
them,-and commerce up and down that
magnificent highway is hurried past
them day and night by rail and keel.
Grant's tomb on the heights of Riverside
park in New York city looks out upon
the palisades of the lower Hudson and
southward to where it broadens into the
finest harbor on the continent. Van
Buren's grave at Kinderhook is back a few
miles from the river, near the shore of a
beautiful lake of that name, and some
thing like thirty miles below the head of
Hudson navigation. Arthur's remains
lie on one of the west side bluffs of the
river, only three miles below the termi
nus of navigable water. Northward
from that terminus the Hudson is a
stream' of inferior dimensions flowing
from the solitudes of the Adirondack
forest.
The home of the Arthur family was in
this region of the upper Hudson. Ches
ter Allan Arthur, the president, was the
son of Rev. William Arthur, a native of
County Antrim, Ireland, and a Baptist
clergyman by profession. While the fa
ther was pastor of a congregation in
Fairfield, Vt., the child who was to sitat
the head of the nation was born. The
family subsequently removed to Albahy
county, where, in the little hamlet of
Newtonville, William Arthur died on
the 27th of October, 1875. He lived to
see his son grow into manhood, and
that manhood ripen.
A family burial plot had been selected
in the Albany Rural cemetery some years
before the president's father died. It
now contains the graves of the father
and mother of the president, those of his
wife, son, a sister, a brother-in-law and
his wife's mother. All of these wentbe
fore the president to this silent sunny
family home. Thelate ex-president died
in New York city on Nov. 18,1886. After
a funeral service in the metropolis his
remains were taken to the Albany cenie
tery, accompanied by a large number of
personal friends. The funeral was private
in the sense that everything was done by
the family and by the personal associates
of the deceased. The newspapers in
dulged some afterward in the usual talk
about a monument befitting the manand
a president of the United States, but no
official action was taken in the matter
either by congress or the legislature of
his state. No such action has been
necessary to properly mark the grave.
Personal friends, men of high rank in
politics and in public affairs, who were
collaborators with Mr. Arthur in the
latter years of his political and social
career, have caused to be set up at his
grave a granite memorial as modest in
proportions as it is simple in design and
indestruetible in material.
TOOe artour plot is on toe western nor
der of what is known as the old part of
the cemetery, and at the summit of the
first ascent of the hill from the river
valley. The outlookistoward the north
west, terminating on the right in a
woody ravine, at the bottom of which a
clear cold brook flows, summer and win
ter, over a stony bed down through the
cemetery and across the plain to the
Hudson; and on the left in a broad ex
panse of burial plots, thickly studded
with granite blocks and shafts, which
denote at the same time the graves of
dear friends departed and the wider dis.
tribution of wealth in thesemore modern
times. At the bottom of the ravine, di
rectly in front of the Arthur lot, a spring
of cold, delicious water bubbles out
from the foot of a gigantic elm. To
this fountain everybody visiting the
locality and knowing of its existence re
sorts for a refreshing drink.
Among the monuments in the field of
vision toward the left of the Arthur plat
are those of Thurlow Weed and the late
secretary of the treasury, Daniel Man
ning. Further round to the left stands
a magnificent polished granite shaft to
the memory of the revolutionary gen
eral, Philip Schuyler, the defender of
* the upper Hudson valley during the war
for independence, while on the margins
of the ravine above spoken of and about
half way down the slope of the cemetery
bluff arethe monuments, standing nearly
opposite each other, of the revolutionary
general, Gansevoort, and Governor Will
iam L. Marcy, of this state.
The memorial block which the friends
of President Arthur have now set up by
his grave stands a little to the westward
of the center of the family plot. It is
approached by a rise of five granite steps,
curving inwardly and 10 feet wide be
tween the granite newel posts, whic]
are 9 feet square, with caps to corre
spend. The base stone of the monumeni
is 10 feet long by 6 feet 7 inches wide ant
l foot 5 inches thiok. It is dressed gran
ite. not polished. Ne.t above this is i
polished granite block, 9 feet a mcnes
long by 5 feet 8 inches wide and 7 inches
thick. On this platform are two up
right blocks of polished granite, about 2
feet square and the same in height, carry
the massive sarcophagus, which is, of
course, the main feature of the memorial
structure. This is cut and polished from a
single piece of Quincy granite, uniform
in color and finish with the blocks it rests
upon and the base piece on which they
stand. The sarcophagus expands up
ward uniformly on all four faces and is
finished on top in the form of a roof
sloping upward from the ends as well as
from the sides. The dimensions at the
bottom are 6 feet 9 inches by 8 feet 9.
At the top the length is 8 feet with a
proportional increase in the width. The
depth of the sarcophagus from the peak
of the roof is about 4 feet. Tie whole is
polished with scrupulous care. No flaws
or dislocations are to be seen. The name
"ARTHUR," in plain Roman capitals, is
cut into the polished base piece. No
other mark of the chisel is made on the
monument.
A notable piece of emblematical sculp
ture in bronze is placed at the northwest
corner of the sarcophagus. It is a life
size figure of Sorrow, female in form, in
Greek drapery and head dress, and with e
wings proportioned to the size of the
body. The toes of one foot are exposed
beneath the robe. The right bare arm
hangs at leisure over the swelling outline
of the hip, while the left rests upon the
top of the sarcophagus, the palm of the
hand upward holding the stem of a
broad palm leaf which lies on the sarco
phagus parallel with its longest dimen
sion. The body of the figure, the wings
and the palm leaf, which the left hand
holds as if it was just being laid on the
grave of the ex-president, are all of
bronze. The design and model of the
figure were made by E. Keyser, whose
studio is in Madison avenue, New
York, and the casting was done in Phila
delphia. The spectator, viewing this
monument as a whole from a distance
and without seeing the name upon it,
will always feel impressed with its plain
massiveness. No merely purse proud
friend approved of this tasteful and im
posing tribute to the memory of conser
vative President Arthur.
The other family memorial stones on
the plot are among the plainest in the
cemetery. They were all set up before
it was known that the remains of a presi
dent would repose among the graves.
The president's father's headstone, a
marble slab about three feet high, bears
this inscription:
"Rev. William Arthur, D. D. Born in
County Antrim, Ireland, 1796; died in
Newtonville, Albany county, Oct. 27,
1875, aged 79 years."
The mother's headstone, by the side of
the father's and uniform with it, is in
scribed:
"Malvina Stowe, wife of William Ar
thur. Born at Berkshire, Vt., April 29,
1802; died at Newtonville, Jan. 16, 1869.
tHer children rise up and call her blessed;
her husband also, and he praiseth her."
A sister's tablet, which lies prone and
is partially covered with earth and
grass, is thus inscribed:
"Jane, daughter of Rev. William and
Itelvina Arthur. Born April 15, 1842,
aged 18 years. The last enemy that
shall be destroyed is death."
On the right of the father's and moth
er's graves is that of a brother-in-law to
the president, on the headstone of which
the stranger reads:
"William G. Gow. Born Sept. 8, 1816.
Died in Cohoes, Aug. 1, 1804."
Mrs. Gow, President Arthur's sister,
has lived much of the time since her
husband died with Mrs. John E. Mc
Elroy, who had charge of the White
House during her brother's administra
r tion.
The president lies buried by the side of
his wife, who died in January of the same
year in which her husband was nom
n inatea for vice president in June. Her
grave is marked by a marble sarcopha
gus the size of an ordinary burial casket.
Round the margin of the top this old
English style of inscription appears in
raised letters
REAR VIEW OF ARTHUR'S MONUMENT.
"Here lies the body of Ellen Lewis
Herndon, wife of Chester A. Arthur.
Bos at Culpeper C. H.,VirginiaAug.
80, l87. Died at New York, Jan. 1t,
1850." ii
There are two other graves in this
family group. One, mared by a delicate
marble cross, is inscribed:
"William Lewis Herndon Arthur; died
July 8, 1868, aged 2 years 7 months."
The other, a polished granite slab, bears
this inscription:
"Elizabeth H. Herdon, wife of Lewis
Herndon, U. 8. N.; born Oct. 10, 1817,
at Va.; died at Hyeres, France,
April 27, 1878."
The stor o how this woman's heroic
I husband, Lieut. Herndon, died at sea inct
Sorderthat the women and children might
he saved from his sinking ship will run
parallelin histoitry with the publi works
Arthur.
Particles In the Eye.
Every mother knows how often littl
ones get something in the eye. Tak,
hold of the lashes of the upper lid with
the left hand, and pressing the dull poin
of a pencil against the middle of the lid
turn it upward; then remove the sub
stance with a camel's hair brush or the
corner of a soft handkerchief. Particles
of lime often cause great pain if they ge
into the eye, as anyone who has eve;
whitewashed a ceilingcan testify. Appl,
weak vinegar to neutralizethe alkali anc
remove the particle as directed.-Herald
of Health.
Tne untea tates pays $Uo,00u a year
for its weather service, Great Britain
$80,000, Germany $56,000, Russia $66,
000, Austria $10,000, Switzerland $6,000,
France $60,000. And, though no Euro
pean nation attempts to do as much as
we do, or takes general observations
more than once a day, the percentage of
verification of predictions is rising there,
which is hardly the case in this country.
Our weather service, with its great coat
and thorough organization, ought to he
the best in the world.-Detroit Fos
AKIN
POWDER
Absolutely Pure.
This Powder never varies. A mnrvel
of purity than the ordinary kinds, and 1
cannot be sold in competition with the
n multitude of low test, short weight, alum
or phosphalte powders. Sold only in cans.
ROYAL BAKoNo POWDER CO.,
107 Wall street, New York.
NEW YORK
a ra Cr
Pardon this intrusion, but we must
tell you we have given
competitors
A . BLACK - EYE
And we did it in a fair fight, without
I fear or favor. Everybody knows the
sharp struggle that has gone on in
d the dry goods business in this town,
d and everybody will be glad that our
cash system has won. This has been
d no scrap for gate money; no pillow
3, fight fake, but a genuine struggle
at which has taped resources to the end.
We knocked out competitors by that
a terrific under-cut on Dry Goods, etc.,
to that ended it. They refused to come
d to time and the cut remains unan
swered.' We are the winners, but the
8. prizes are yours. Remember that
our success guarantees you the same
:, high grades as ever.
to PRICES LOWER THAN EVER !
of Less profit and more patronage is
as our idea of future trade. We.don't
n worry about patronage. Make prices
er right and any trade will be sure to
follow. Come and share the spoils
A with the victors.
ld
R. D. Beckon,
Prop'r New York Cash Bazaar
$17,000 !
Sheriff's Sale
Underand by virtue of an eecention issued
out of the Distri Ct Court of the Fourth Jdiial
District, County of Clhotean, Territory of Mon
tana, and to me directed and delivered for a
judgment rendered in said court on the 9th day
of ay, A. D. 1, in favor of . . Baker & Co.
and against Charls P. Thomson, for the sum of
$18 0. in money, toether with cosats of suit
d interest I haveied onall the right, title
claim and interst of saiddefendant, of, in and
to the following roperty, to
entire stook of Dry os in the store re
cently occupied by C. P. Thomson, on Central
vene, GrPeat F alls Casaed county Montana.
This isthe taonst ecoated sato k of Ds Goods
and Notions ever brought to Northern Montana,
sbeinhg E'l,0 in vale, to be sold at publoi auc
tion. Itcomprises-
Etreme French Novelties in Dress G oods,
n immense variety of New Weaves and Styles
inSr aod Salaae mmer Tints,
Ottomans,
Empessa Cloth,
Teasnnis Cloth,
AlpaCas,
Cashmeres.
Summer Fiannels, Silk Mixed, etc., ets.
A ndless variety of cheap Dreas Goods,
bleached and unbleached.
A Rtasortment of Carpets. Mattianss Oil0
A larges assootmnt of Bedding, Mattresses,
Pillows, Blankets, ®lltc, etc.
Ladies'and Gentlemen's Glovesi of all styles
and shades.
Shawls, Saummer Wraps, Newmarkets, Jackets
and Ciroalas.
Notions in endlessa variety.
Underwear in all styylss. In fat everything
to be found in a flrstotsss Dry loods store,
Als tls following store faxtsres:
Four Show Casrs,
One Cloak Rack,
One Mirror,
One Ribbon Case,
n Pour Tables,
SHat Stand, tove, Sofa, Bedstead, Washatand,
SItop-laddaer, Chairs
I Four Boast Store-Lanps,
Hat Rack four Lamps,
bCounters, Shelving, eta.
INotice is herebby given that on
Monday, the 27th day of May, 1889,
AT 1 O'CLOCK P. M.,
1Of said day. and to continue from day to dany
Suntilsold,l. d sad all the right, tls andin
terest of said Cha. . Thomson in and tothe
Sabove descrhedproperty, or so much thereof as
may be necessary to satisfy plaintiff!, cainm, be.
aides all costa interest and accruing cost.
S This sale wll tk e at the lststore of C
P, Thomson, Great Fans, atpuaiobactoi oi
cash in hand, t h ighesste destbidde
C. P. Downing, Sheriff.'
Dated Great Falls, Mont.. this 18th day of May,
S A NASAL INJECTOR free with each
bottle of Shiloh's Catarah Remedy. Price
0 centas For sale by Lape3re Bro.
it CROUP WHOOPING COUGH and
a Bronchitis immediately cured by Shiloh's
w Cure. For sale at Lapeyre Bros.
THE GREAT
Sale of Sales!
NOW GOING ON AT
HARRIS, the Clothier's.
EVERYTHING REDUCED :
500 Suits at $5, formerly - - $ 8
200 Suits at $7, formerly - - 10
100 Suits at $10, formerly - - 15
100 Suits at $12, formerly - - 18
A like reduction in all our departments of
len's Furnishings, Hats & Shoes
THEY MUST ALL BE SOLD,
HARRIS, The Clothier.
One Price. - - i Square Dealing.
Great Falls Boat House.
ON BROADWATER BAY, NEAR R. R. BRIDGE.
The finest boats in the Northwest, and the best boating anywhere.
FISHING TACKLE TO LET.
J. D. TAYLOR, Prop'r.
OREGON AND NATIVE
L T .71VI BE' I, ,
-ALSO
Wood and Coal.
A large and well assorted stock of all
kinds of Lumber, Lath, Shingles, Doors,
Windows and Building Material constant
ly on hand.
G. H. Goodrich.
Dress Making and Millineryl.
MRS. E. L. DUSSAULT,
(Recently oef Duluth)
Will Open on April I Oth a Large Stock. of Goods
IN THE LUTHER BLOCx, ROOM FOIMEBRLY OCCUPIED BY JENSEN.
Mrs. Dessault has had sixteen years experience in-the largest cities, and will
establish the above business in accordance with the strong ehcouragement accorded
her by the ladies of Great Falls.
H. NALBACH,
Leading Merchant Tailor,
OF NORTHERN MONTANA.
Just Received a New Stock of Spring and
Summer Clothes.
Second St., bet. Central and First Ave. ~Nnrth.
SHar gMartin & a rl,
W OO L.
Liberal cash advances made on consignments. Sight draft with original
bill of lading attached.
No. 132 Federal Street,
BOSTON, - - - MASS.
. - --:. ----
E. V. RUBOTTOM,
Paper-Hanging and lrsaning
* HOUSE PAINTING AND CALCIMINING.
Third street, bet First and Second Ave. South. Great Falls
BACH, CORY & CO
Great Falls, Montana.
Groceries, Hardware, Crockery,
Stoves and Tinware.
We carry the largest stock of Groceries and
Hardware in Northern Montana.
GROCERY DEPARTMENT.
This stock is all new goods of the best grades only. We buy everything in car ]e
from first hands and our prices cannot be met west
ot the Missouri river.
Hardware Department.
This is the largest and most complete stock carried in this portion of the terr.
ritory. This stock includes Mining Tools, Steel, Iron, etc., Blacksmith Supplies f
all kinds, Builder's and General Hardware, Heating and Cooking Stoves and a fll
assortment of Tin and Granite Ware.
S. C. AsHBY. C . A IROADnVATR,
S. C. ASHOBY & CO.,
HELENA AND GREAT FALLS..
ise / eeoremieoP(
F..
McCormick's Celebrated Mowers and Binders,
MITCHELL FARM AND SPRING WAGONS,
THOMAS RAKES AND KEYSTONE HAY LOADERS,
Fine Carriages, Buggies, Phwtons, Buokboards & Road Carts.
$-P We carry in stock a full lipe of Team and Buggy Harness, SuddA
Bridles, Whips, Lap Robes Curry Combs, Brushes, etc. Also Acme, Disc, Slrit
Tooth and Drag Harrows, Hoosier Drills and Seeders, Superior Drill, Planet Jr. G..
den Cultivators and" Drills, Wall T'ents, Wagon Covers, Feed Mills, Barb Wire, et
S, DEDERIOK HAY PRESSES.
BLA.I` T3 'TIEB.
Furst & Bradley's Sulky, Gang and Walking Ploes
EXTRAS FOR MACHINERY.
Will offer this month
A Late Importation of Gent' Cothi0,
Suoh as
Scotch Cheviots and Worsteds,
At a great reduoation in price, ranging allthe way from $6.50, $8.50, $9, $1R
5, 3 17, 2250, $S0.
LADIES AND GENTS CRUSHERS
In an endless variety of color, Will sell them from 75e,
$1; $850, $1.75, , $2.50. Not equaled in town.
CENT *U I!WSHINCS, etc.
In GENTS' SHIRTS 'you will d the .onMit.4 ind' largest assor
ment,' such as Silk ass and Cheviots ranging in price from m
We have also a large collection- of NEOK WEAR, whioh we will
sel at :25. cents.
Our stock. of BOOTS ABNP SHOES is. very ; largme and all very
munh below ,regular prieas.
JI- Mail rdera' promptly attended to.
. N ATHAN.,
THE ONE-PRICE CLOTHIER.
GREAT FALLS, - -- - - - - - - O
SHOES,! SHOES! SHOESI
Budge & Kenkel,
CENTRAL. AVENUE.
Boots ! Bots! Boopts

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