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Laurel outlook. [volume] (Laurel, Mont.) 1909-current, January 05, 1944, Image 1

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LAUREL OUTLOOK
Officiai Paper of Yellowstone County
LAUREL, MONTANA, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 5, 1944
VOLUME 35— NO. 27
FIVE CENTS
TWO YELLOWSTONE
Is Gain Of $600,000 In Year,
Says Vice President Harris;
Loans Show Decline
The Dec. 31 call report of the
Yellowstone banks, Laurel and Co
lumbus, shows assets in excess of
$4,000,000 and capital and surplus
of $180,000, says B. Meyer Harris,
vice president. This is an increase
of $600,000 in assets during the
year 1943.
The statement also shows a re
markable liquidation in loans in the
territory , served. The loans have
reduced $385,000 or about 38#.
This seems to indicate a general
desire to get out of debt. All of
the decrease has been reinvested
in government securities at rates of
three-eights of 1# and up and
with maturities of '90 days and
longer.
"There has been a considerable
switch from sheep to cattle during
the past year on account of the dif
ficulty in securing labor. While
livestock prices aie down somewhat
from the top, the prices are still
satisfactory and the grower's big
gest problem is high-priced feed and
labor," Vice President Harris said.
}
PARK CITY POSTMASTER
The United States civil service
commission has announced an open
competitive examination to fill the
vacancy in the postmaster in Park
City, Mont., in accordance with an
act of congress approved June 25,
1938.
In order to be eligible for tlie
examination, an applicant must be
a citizen of the United States, must
have actually resided within the de
livery of the postoffice for which
the examination is held, or within
the city or town where such office
is situated, for at least one year
immediately preceding the date fix
ed for the close of receipt of ap
semble in an examination room for
written tests, and will also be rat
ed on their education and business
or proffessional experience, general
qualifications and suitability. The
civil service commission will make
plications, must be in good physical
condition, and within the prescribed
The competition is
limits.
age
open to both men and women.
The civil service commission will
certify the names of the highest
three qualified eligibles to the post
master general who shall thereupon
submit the name of the eligible se
lected to the president for nomina
tion, Confirmation by the senate is
the final action.
Applicants will be required to as
an impartial inquiry among repre
sentative patrons of the office, both
men and women, concerning the ex
perience, ability, and character of
each applicant, and the evidence
thus secured will be considered in
determining the ratings to be as
signed to the applicants. The com- !
mission is not interested in the po
litical, religious or fraternal affilia
tons of any applicant
Full information and application
forms mav be obtained at the post
office for »which the examination is
from the United States
held,
civil service commission, Washing
ton, D. C. Applications must he
on file in the office of the commis
sion at Washington, D. C., not later
than the date specified at the heal
of the announcement.
or
More Clothing For
Children, Prospect
Helena, Jan. 5.—Increased pro
duction of infants' and children's
clothing in 1944 was announced to
day by B. L. McFerran, WPB an
alvst here
PntUn fihrie« and worsted and
cotton yarns will be allocated to,
producefs of infants' and children's !
apparel—including outwear and hos- !
iery to insure adequate output of
specific items in the first quarter of j
1944 and also during succeeding:
McFerran stated, how
that such goods will not arrive
until February
• I
quarters.
ever,
on retail counters
and March.
Furlough Fun
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McKinley Park, a luxury hotel in |
Alaska, has. been taken over by thf |
army and is hgc.I as a recreation j
center for women war department
employees and soldiers stationed
there. Margaret Myiias is helped to
her feet by Lieut. Anselm Tibbs Jr
as they walk to the skating pond.

j
Northern Pacific .Trackman
FUNERAL NEED FOB
Died Saturday At Hos
pital In Glendive
Funeral services were held at Our
Savior's - Lutheran church Tuesday
Arthur W. Ham
afternoon for
bidge, 41, Northern Pacific track
man, who died at a Glendive hos
pital Saturday.
He was born at Marysville, Dec.
11, 1902, and lived for a number of ;
years at Marysville, Ekalaka and |
Glendive. He was married to Imo- |
gene Wight at Columbus, Dec. 24. |
1938. The family moved to Laurel |
shortly after and Mr. Hambidge ;
entered the employ of the railroad '
company. i
Surviving are the widow; a 1
daughter, Evelyn, and a son, James; |
two brothers, Walter and George
Hambidge, both of Helena, and a
sister, Mrs. G. L. Pyles of Redding,
Calif.
Rev. A. H. Hanson, pastor of the !
church, conducted the funeral sei- I
vices. With Mrs. C. O. Anderson
accompanying, Mrs. Stanley Filing
son sang "The Old Rugged Cross"
and "In the Garden." Pallbearers ;
were Theodore Schessler. Herman ;
Schessler, Fred Herman, Arthur !
Metzger, Philip Bosch and William
Chopper. Burial was in the Rock-j
va j e cemetery. :
__
Marshall iHSpeCtS (Jailli Jlllline F IghtCFS
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Gen. George C. Marshall, U. S. army chief of staff, and Lieut. John
H. Ferguson (left) of the infantry, watch a well trained jungle fighter
crash a barbed'wire obstacle with a fast lunge. Lieutenant Ferguson, an in
structor in jungle fighting, was the first married man to be drafted from
gan Antonio, Texas. I
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BOY SCOUT TROOP 14
0 HAVE FIRST COURT
The public, friends and parents
of Laurel Boy Scouts, members of
troop 14. are invited to attend the
troop's first court of honor cere
mony which has been announced for
Friday, Jan. 7, at 7:30 p. m. at
the Methodist church.
In making the announcement, of
ficials said the event will include
the presentation of all badges won
during the past year. In addition
there will be tenderfoot investiture
and scoutcraft demonstrations.
The public is invited to see what
the Scouts are doing and to sup-1
port the movement by attending
the ceremony.
WO FROM THIS AREA
BATE AS CADET NURSES
Nearly one-third of students tak
ing the U. J3. cadet nurse corps
training at Montana State College
an d in seven affiliated hospitals
during the fall quarter made an av
e rage scholastic standing of 80 or
better, according to a report just
made by Miss Anna Pearl Sherrick,
coordinator of nursing, Bozeman.
Eighty-four of the students who
took the autumn quarter at the
state college are now taking prac
tical training in hospitals and 40
new students enrolled in the U. S.
cadet nurse corps program which
started this week. The next train
_ ,, ,, , iU . ,
fall at the opening of the regular ,
college year. !
Among students from the Billings j
Deaconess hospital who made the j
high scholastic standing are Ester ;
Ella Thatcher from j
_
ing period for high school students
who graduate this spring will start 1
8 «jJ C £XKdT; i
another course starting early in the :
Coombs and
this area.
y on»»ol T aele IIqvo !
Ajtllircl LdUs DdVc ,
Rpiininn ("'nliTovtlifl î
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There was something of a Lau- j
:
rel get-together recently in south- ;
ern California, The Laurel Outlook i
has the following, dated Dec. 28, •
from Van Nuys, Calif:
"Bert Sherrow, an air cadet from !
Santa Ana, Calif., was a guest of
Mr. and Mrs. Forrest Sarff at Van .
Nuys, friends of George Shearer,
Jr., who also is in that city. After
a lovely day there, George and Bert
went to the home of Mr. and Mrs:
J. P. McMann (Mrs. McMann, the
former Nona Hageter, is a daugh
ter of Mrs. Nora Hageter of Lau
rel) at Glendale, where to their sur- ;
prise they ran into Ralph Gjefle
of Laurel who is an air cadet at
Lancaster, Calif. The company had
a grand time talking over old times
and spent a pleasant evening danc
ing at the Aragon ballroom in
Santa Monica, Calif."
_I
Russian Generals Visit Allied olh Army
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Major General Vasiliev is pictured saluting as his party of Soviet gen
erals drives away in a jeep after a visit to Gen. Bernard L. .Montgom
ery's 8th Army command. Vasiliev was named as the commander who
directed the campaign which cut off the German armies in the Crimea.
Illness; Funeral Thursday
_____
Oliver Morton Harp, 83, father of
Mrs. C. W. Laird, died Monday at
r - lr ' P- m - at the Lain! home,
Fourth avenue, following an illness
[extending from last Aug. 14 when
he suffered a stroke. He had been
p a ther Of Mrs.C.W. Laird Sue
rumbs After Several Months
O.M.HARPGLAIMEO
a res| d ent Laurel 26 years,
, T} le funeral has been arranged
î f° r Thursday at 2 p. m. at the
Laurel Masonic temple. Corinthian
j lodge No. 72, A. F. & A. M., of
j which Mr. Harp had been a member
; many years, will be in charge of
i t h e riteS) w ith Rev. M. J.
• 0 f Methodist church officiating,
Burial will be at the Laurel ceme
! tery.
Harp was born Aug. 30, I860,
. Willow Creek, Lee county, III.
His parents were Mr. and Mrs.
j am es A. Harp who went to Iowa
v j a> covered wagon in 1864 and set
t]ed on a farm near lowa Palls.
H e married Ruth Lucretia Me
Fher son in 1882. They went to
Dead wood, S. D., where their oniv
; child, Marv Olive, was horn.
The family returned to Alden,
i 0W a, in 1893 and resided there a
number of years. The daughter
and her husband, Mr. an Mrs. C.
w. Laird, came to Laurel and Mr.
and Mrs. Harp moved here in 1917.
Mrs. Harp died Aug. 24, 1937, and
Mr. Harp had since made his home !
with Mr. and Mrs. Laird. He re- 1
tired from active business several
Wilcox
years ago.
In addition to the daughter, Mrs.
Laird, he is survived by a sister
Mrs. P. D. MacBride of Chicago.
and two grandchildren, Ruth Laird ;
of Portland, Ore., and John O.
Laird who is with the armed forces j
and at present is attending school ;
in Cambridge, Mass.
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Radio Owners May
Soon Get Tubes For
Now Silent Outfits
.
-
Helena, Jan. 5.—Four and a half
million radio tufies of critical types
for civilian receiving sets will be i
produced in 1944, it was announced
today by Oscar A. Baarson, WPB
district manager here. i
Tubes for household radio sets
are being scheduled for production
in sizeable quantities by plants best
equipped to produce them, accord
ing to Baarson. The civilian tube j
not be a complete
program may
solution to the home radio set prob
lem, but it will sene to put back
into sendee thousands of the sets
which have been "blacked out" by
limited tube supplies, according to ;
vv f' B -
<™«nue to reach civ.l.an out-.
ets ,n increasing quantities as the
new program gets under way.
Jhe "hard-to-get" t>T>es of tubes
which are being pushed are
G 12-SK-7, 50-L-6, 35-7-5, oo-L-G,
l-H-5, l-A-7, 80 and other critical
types which have not been produced
in sufficient numbers.
r» «r » Li ,,
Peril Of Joblessness, Means
Of Prevention After War
_
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lost-war unemployment among;
returning veterans would give agi
Duvall Says Gorman To Discuss
J.F.W.TD TELL OF
^'Ltators and the demagogues on oppor 1
tunity to promote the same tactics ;
which Hitler employed to lead the
German people into fascism. This |
is the warning sounded by Com- I
mander A. T. Duvall of Billings j
post No. 1634, Veterans of Foreign !
Wars of the U. S., with the an- j
nouncement that his organization is j
already making plans to assist the |
speedy rehabilitation of those who,
are discharged from
forces after the victory.
"Our ideas on this subject will be
the armed |
;
fully explained in the thirty-eighth
of our series of 'Speak Up For De- ;
mocracy' talks which will be broad- i
, , . ,
employment among veterans car, be,
eradicated if steps are taken to help,
^ hase who are discharged to become .
independent and self-supporting as |
quic kly as possible,
cast over station KGHL at 10:45 J
by Frank J. Gorman,
Commander Duvall I
a. m., Jan. 11,
According to
the potential evils of post-war un- ;
Openers Are Away From Horn«
With Klein, Roundup—Park
City To Play Here Jan. 12
The Locomotives will start this
basketball season when the team
plays Roundup and Klein on Jar.
7 and 8. The home season will open
next Wednesday, Jan. 12, when the
Park City Panthers come to the
local court.
Coach T. H. Bennett started
!
...... .
workouts again with the opening of
school on Monday after giving tfK ' |
squad a rest during the holidays.
About 25 boys are still on the squad
and most of them will see action
in the games played on the Locomo
tives' home court, according to Ben
nett. The coach has not yet select
ed his first squad because of the
large number of very promising
freshmen and sophomores out.
"With Kennard Cook, as our only
experienced player, these freshmen
and sophomores have a fine chance
of playing this year," Bennett said.
Most of the boys are smaller than
the average Laurel team over the
last ten years, according to the
only two boys over the sjx-foot
mark. When asked what chances
I
he thought the Locomotives had in
their first two games away from
home, he said, "Roundup hasn't been
beaten this year and Klein has lost
only two—Columbus and Roundup—
but we hope to win at least one of
these games."
ISPECIAL APPEAL
SAVE ALL HOBS
Tremendous War Load Coming
Soon; All Transportation Is
Faced By Big Job
Because the nation's transporta
tion industry is faced with a tre
mendous war load in coming
months, a special appeal to farmers
• and ranchers of the Rocky Mountain
region to conserve their present
motor equipment, has been issued
by Asa J. Merrill, regional direc
tor of the office of defense trans
portation.
Shortage of new vehicles, repair
parts and tires makes the transpor
tation problem critical for the next
few months, Merrill said. Faced
with these threats, truckers find
their tonnage increasing and the
wear and tear on present equip
ment greater than in normal times.
Those engaged in agriculture are
urged to take advantage of the short
time before planting season starts
to check their equipment and see
that it is placed in the best possi
ble condition. Those having diffi
culty in obtaining repair parts may
obtain help from the nearest ODT
district office.
Fanners and ranchers are urged
to conserve vehicles as much as
possible by cooperating with their
neighbors in sharing hauls and cut
ing down duplicating trips.
It is pointed out by ODT offi
cial that keeping the products of
the farms and ranches moving to
market is as much a part of the
war effort as aetivitie £ closer
the fighting front, and conservation
of present equipment is declared es
sential to virtorv
Qjyj, officials are ex Dressing con
L ern Qver the shortage of new
trucks and it is certain old ones
must be kept running on "borrow
ed time" for months to come.
The war production board has ap
proved an increase in civilian truck
production for 1944, but the out
look for enough to meet ordinary
demands is not promising, ODT of
ficials say.
The civilian truck pool is virtual
ly exhausted,
a few hundred were delivered.
new trucks are made
"will take
... , .. . ,
owner should care for h, truck
with the assumption that it is ir
replaceab le until after t he war,
Of 7,500 trucks ap
proved for production in the third
and fourth quarters of 1943, only
What
available," Merrill said,
care of only the most urgent needs,
It is imperative, therefore, that
truck operators exercise all possible
care and conserve their present ve
Every truck
hides and equipment.
huit, anno (io
Mrs. 1'mninuer. Chairman, Ex
\pprt-riatiun As
Sears *!«>«*
Laurel,
Christmas
• «-* pressed her
U» the resident« of
•ir support in the cam
ilrol tuberculosis
»Iter.
19«3
paign
Montana
apifPTOiHH.
Laurel for thf
U. rofi
ID
"The continuance of this program
is of importance to prevent a
threatened war-time rise in the
death rate from tuberculosis in thie
state," she said.
"But," she adds, "we cannot close
our campaign until all seals have
been accounted for. Those who
have forgotten to make their con
tributions or to return unused seals
are urged to do so as soon as pos
sible, nor is it too late to make ad
ditional purchases if desired."
Mrs. Penninger said
that collections
about $416,
final gross figure should be slightly
greater than the current figure,
Mrs. Penninger indicated.
this week
so far had been
less expenses. The
Isaac Platz In Hospital
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Platz took
Mr. Platz's father, Isaac Platz, to
the Deaconess hospital is Billings
Sunday evening and report that he
is sufferisg from pleurisy and
holism. They report that although
Mr. Platz is 89 years old, this »
his first serious illness.
errv-

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