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The Livingston enterprise. [volume] (Livingston, Mont.) 1883-1914, November 22, 1884, Image 1

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VOL. 2. NO.
LIVINGSTON, MONTANA, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 22,1884.
22 .
PRICE 10 CENTS.
IJYINCSTON,
MONTANA
;.m UDÀY. NOVEMBER 22, 1884.
M BHIlll'TlOX RATEN— PAYABLE IN ADVANCE.
On<' year ....................................$3 r»o
Si*: mont I ih....................... 2 00
Thro*» months..................... 1 25
Single copies................................ 10
Miss Jennie A. Henderson is authorized to re
reive and receipt forsubscriptions to the Weekly
Enterprise at Mammoth Hot 'prints.
ADVKRTISINO RATES.
SPACE.
One Inch
Two I ncli
Three Inch.
Four I rich
Quar. ( ul
Half C"1
One ( V.I.....
^ - X
|
Î 1
c
« 1 y i 3 75 5 L")
7 50
10 50
15.
' •> 75 |j INI 9 INI
12 (KI
16 50
24.
;j rr, h .v) il m•
10 IK)
22 50
33.
1 .Ml 10 50 15 IK)
19 (KI
28 (K)
42.
0 00 13 50 19 00
24 (KI
30 00
60.
!l 50 •■£! (KI 35 (KI
45 (KI
Oil (KI
108.
15 (KI 39 (KI 50 (KI
72 00 108 (K)
180.
TERRITORIAL OFFICERS.
(.overnor Jno. Schuyler Croshv. Helena.
Secretary J. I). McCutcheon, Helena,
i »elevate to Congress —Martin Maginnis, Helena.
Audijor—J. 1'. Woolinan, Helena.
Treasurer—D. If. Weston, Helena.
superintendent of Public Instruction—Corne
ous Hedges, Helena.
\ttoruev-< ieneral—J. A. Johnston, Helena.
District Attorney—1st District— T. H. Edwards,
^ District Attorney—2d District—W. Y. Pember
t "?)istrii t Attorney—3d District—J. A. Johnston,
U ( hivi Justice—D ». Wade, Helena.
A-sociiite Justice—W. J. Galbraith, Deer Lodge.
j\ S. District Attornev— «I. M. DeWitt, Butte.
('. s. Marshal—Alex. C. Botkin, Helena
•surveyor-Oeneral—John S. Harris, Helena.
( lerk lst District Court— Theo. Muffly, Virginia
* clerk 2d District Court— R. L. Davis, Deer
Lodge.
Clerk 3 d District Court—A. If. Beattie, Helena.
Collector of Internal Revenue— T. P. Fuller,
Helena.
Collector of Customs—Win. II. Hunt, Benton.
C. S. Assaver— R. B. Harrison, Helena.
Register of l'. ». Land Office, at Helena—Fran
is Adkinson.
GALLATIN COUNTY.
Sheriff— C- P. Blakely; deps., John Conly, Geo.
fc\ Metcalf.
Treasurer— W. F. Sloan.
Probate Judge—J. P. Martin.
County Clerk and Recorder—M. M. Black.
.»So-:s»or ----
•'oroner— J. Didawick
t oiiuty Commissioners—Sam Holliday,
J. 1 '., Livingston Precinct—Newton Seward, D
II. Bualong.
Constables—John Winnett, Morris Cook.
County Superintendent of schools— -
;iR V A. S4VARE, JOHN II ELPEB,
Notary Public, N : P. Land Agent.
RAVAGE & ELDER,
TTORNKY» AT LAW AND REAL EoTATE AoENTB
Practice in all the Courts of the Territory.
Main street.
Livingston, M, T.
ROBERT D. ALTON, M. D.
Sitboeon Noiithern Pacific R. R. Co.
IE PE RLE Y & AYRAULT,
RK AL ESTATE, FIRE AND LIFE
UNSURANCB.
RIVERSIDE ADDITION.
irres pondence solicited.
Office on Main Street.
VEOUGE IIALDORN,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
IVINGSTON ' : ^DiN'J.'AftlA
N It. PERRY,
PH YSIC AN AN D SI KG EON.
AYINGSTOX, * MONTANA.
Leave orders at I*. O. drug store.
I S, SCOTT, D. D. S.,
* DENTIST,
llings, - Montana,
fille teeth with Gold and Plastic fillings,
ilounts Artificial teeth on Rubber and Celluloid
il on the roots of the natural teeth : Solicits
Bruit cases and guarantees satisfaction or no
arjie. , ...
Anaesthetics administered. Office adjoining
K. Mallon A Co.'s meat market.
yt. C. A. McNI LTY,
DENTIST.
il kinds of dental work done. Office opposite
let-office.
Bank of Livingston
STEBBINS, MUND & CO.,
Livingston, * » Montan«
Transacts a
GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS.
Exchange on all the principal cities of the
United States and Europe.
Interest Allowed on TIME DEPOSITS.
Collections made a specialty. Correspond
ence solicited.
associated banks.
Stebbins, Mund A Co., Miles City.
Stebbins. Mund & Co.. Billings. ,
Stebbins, Conrad & Co., Buffalo, \t yo g
Merchants National Bank, Deadwood, D. T.
Stebbins, Mund & Fox, Central, D. T.
r- Stebbins, Fox & Co , Spearflsh, I>. T.
À. L. LOVE Cashier.
— THE —
Chicago Milwaukee
& St. Paul
Railway is the short line from St. Paul
and Minneapolis, via La Crosse and Mil
waukee, to CHICAGO and all points in
the eastern States and Canada.
IT IS THE ONLY LINE
Under one management between St. Paul
and Chicago, and is the finest equipped
railway in the Northwest.
IT IS THE ONLY LINE
Running Pullman Sleeping cars, Palace
Smoking cars and the finest Dining cars in
the world, via the famous
RIVER BANK ROUTE,
Along the shores of Lake Pcpm and the
beautiful Mississippi river to Milwaukee
and Chicago. Its trains connect with
those of the northern lines in the grand
Union Depot at St, Paul.
NO CHANGE OF CARS
Of any class between St Paul and Chi
engo. For through tickets, time tables,
and full information apply to any coupon
sicket agent in the northwest.
S. S. Merrill, A. V. H. Carpenter,
General Manager. GenI Pass. Agt
J T. Clark, G. II. Heafford,
Genl Supt. Asst Genl Pass. Agt
Milwaukee, Wis.
W . II. Dixon, General Northwestern Pas
MBgw Age&t, et. p»u), lfto
no. 30
APPLICATION FOK A PATENT,
F. S. Land Office at Bozeman, |
Teukitoiiv of Montana, Sept. 13,1884. f
Notice is herein- given that Josef Brown, James
Gourlev, Jacob F. Spieth and Charles Krug,
whose postoffice address is Bozeman, Montana,
except Josef Brown, whose poetoffice address
is Gardiner, Montana, have this day filed their
application for a patent for[1400j fourteen hundred
linear feet of the "Tip Top ' (Quartz Lode Mining
Claim, mine or vein hearing gold and iron with
surface ground five hundred and seventv-foHr
feet in width, situated in Sheepeater, so-called,
[unorganized] mining district, county of Gallatin,
and Territory of Montana, and designated by the
field notes and official plat on file in this office as
Survey Number Forty-Eight, in Township Nine,
south of Hange Eight east, approximately of
Montana meridian, said survey number forty
eight being as follows, to-wit.
Beginning at N W location corner, a post six
inches squa e, in mound of earth marked 1-48 for
corner No. 1 , from which Sheepeater initial po.nt
bears N 81 degrees 56 minutes, W 247b.4 feet, and
a blazed pine tree 10 inches in diameter marked
1-48 B. T., bears N 22 degrees 30 minutes, E 4.5
feet thence S 74 degrees, E 574 feet to post six
inches square in mound of earth marked 2-48 for
corner No. 2; thence S 16 degrees, W 1400 feet to
post six inches square in mound of earth marked
3 48 for corner No. 3. from which a blazed spruce
tree marked 3-48 B. T. bears N 66 degrees 53 min
utes, E 27.5 feet, thence N 74 degrees, W 574 feet
to a post six inches square in mound of earth
marked 4-48 for corner No. 4; thence N 16 de
grees, E 1400 feet to the place of beginning.
Magnetic variation 19 degrees 45 minutes E,
18.45 acres.
The location of this mine is recorded in the re
corder's office of recorder of said county, in book
4 of mining claims page 42. The adjoining
claimants are the said Brown, Spieth, Gourley
and Krug, on the "Mountain Chief Loue" on
South.
Any and all persons claiming adversely any
portion of said "Tip Top " Quartz Lode Mining
Claim, mine or surface ground are required to
file their adverse claims with the Register of the
United States Land nffice, at Bozeman, in the
County of Gallatin, Montana, during the sixty
day's period of publication hereof, or they will
be barred by virtue of the provisions of the
statute.
O. P. CHISHOLM, Register.
Luce & Armstrong, Att'ys for Applicants.
Bozeman, Montana. sep20-70d
e, 1
?. a 'f
TVfOTICE FOR PUBLICATION IN A
il NEWSPAPER.
Mining Application, No. 29.
United States Land Office,
Bozeman, Territory of Montana,
September 9th, 1884.
Notice is hereby given that Bear Gulch Placer
Company, a corporation organized under the
laws of'the Territory of Wyoming, by J tmes
Gourley, its attorney in fact, whose principal
place of business and postoffice address is Boze
man, Montana Territory, has this day filed its ap
plication for patent for 93.12 acres of gold bearing
filacer ground, lying and being situated within
the so-called Sheepeater Mining District, (unor
ganized) county of Gallatin, territory of Mon
tana, and designated by the tt>dd notes and offic
ial plat on file in this office, as survey No. 43,
mineral district No. 2.12.69 acres thereof being in
Section 24, Tp. 9 S, R 8 E, the rest thereof being
on unsurveyed land, said land being described up
on said survey as follows, to-wit:
Beginning ai location corner No. fi, at a stone
6.20, 14 inches in the ground, marked 1-43 for cor
ner No. 1, from which the east quarter post of
section 24, Tp. 9 S, R 8 E hears S 43 degrees 08
minutes east-919 feet,'thence S 73 degrees 50 min
utes, E 2200 feet to location corner No. 7. a post
5"x4' set 2 feet deep in mound of eqrtli
marked 2-43 for corner No. 2; thenpfi N 33 degrees
13 minutes, E 1650 feet to a post in mound of
earth marked 3-43 for corner No. 3; thence S 38
degrees 10 minutes, east 1400 feet to location cor
ner No. 1, an old stump, at which a post 8"x4'
2 feet deep set in mound of earth marked 4-43 for
corner No. 4; thence S :>■} dmjree* ijd miuutes. VY
minutes, W 28 feet; thence N 86 degrees, W 950
feet to a post in mound of stone marked 6-43 for
corner No. 6 : tlieuce »67 degrees 26 minutes, W
1400 feet to a post in mound of earth marked 7-43
for corner No. "
W 2050 feet to a post
thence N 74 degrees 22 minutes,
post in mound of earth marked
8 43 for corner No. 8 ; thence N 40 degrees, E
1100 feet to corner No. 1, the place of beginnin_.
magnetic variation 18 degrees 25 minutes east.
The location of this mine is recorded in the of
fine of tbP recorder of said county of Gallatin, ip
mining records book 2,- page 545, fried dll' the 2d
day bf April, 1883.
1 There are no adjoining claimants.
An' and all persons claiming adversely any por
tion of said placer mining ground are required to
file their adverse claims with the register of the
United States land office at Bozeman, County of
Gallatin, in the territory of Mont na, or they will
be barred by virtue of the provisions of the
statute. _
O. P. CHISHOLM, Register.
Luce <6 Armstrong, Att'ys for Applicants
poAamau, $funmna |sopl3-9]
IN0- 31.)
TVJOTICE FQR l'U11LICATION IN A
il NEWSPAPER.
Mining Application No 31.
United staves I,and Office, i
Bozlm an, Territory of Montana^
September i3. 1884. 1
Notice is hereby mane that Joseph llrq\yn,
Whose pqstplllce address is Gardiner, Gallatin
Upunty, Montana, 311 U Jacob F. Spieth,
Charles I\rug and James Goprlev, whose post
office address is Bozeman, Gallatin County,
Montana, have this day tiled their application
for u patent for 1500 linear feet of the Mountain
Chief I ode,*mine or vein, bearing gold and
iron, with surface ground fls5 feet in width,
situated in the so-called Slice,.eater Mining
District, (unorganized) County of Gallatin, anil
Territory «f Montana, and designated by the
field notes and official plat on file in this office
as survey No. 46, Mineral District No. 2, in Tp.
9 , S, R 8 ,*E, unsui veyed land, »aid survey No.
46 being described as follows, to-wit:
Beginning at NW location corner at a post
4 feet long set 2 feet deep in mound of earth
marked 1-46, for corner No. 1; from which the
Sheopeat. r ini' ial point bears N 47 degrees 05
minutes, W 2330 9 feet, thence S 71 degrees, i.
300 feet to a point from which discovery shaft
bears S 16 degrees, W 125 feflt, and from said
poiiit 285 feet to post 4 feet long set 2 feet
deep in mound of earth marked 2-46, for corner
No. 2, from which N'E location corner bears S
74 degrees, K 15 feet, and corner No. 3 of sur
vey No. 47 bears S 74 degrees, E 361 feet, thence
Si)degrees 15 minutes, W 1500 feet to post 4
feet long set 2 feet dpen Jn mqpud o{ earth
marked 3-46, for corner No. 3, from which SE
location corner bears S 74 degrees, E lq feet,
thence N 74 degrees, W 585 feet to post set 2 feet
deep in mound of earth marked 4-46, for corner
No. 4. from which a hi axed fir tree SO inches In
diameter marked 4-46 B. T. bears N 74 degrees,
W 20 5 feet, also a blazed fir tree 36 inches in
Magnetic variation 19 degrees 45 minutes E,
containing 20 acres.
The location of this mine is recorded in the
recorder's office of said Gallatin County, in
book 1 of mining records, page 445.
The adjoining claimants are Joseph Brown,
et. al upon the Graham Lode, survey No. 47,
and the Tip Top Lode, survey No. 48, on the
north. . i ,
Any and all persons claiming adversely any
portion of said Mountain Chief Lode, mine or
surface ground, are required to file their ad
verse claims with the Register of the United
States Land Office, at Bozeman, in the Terri
tory of Montana, during the sixty days period
of publication hereof, or they will be barred
bv virtue of the prov ision of the statute.
O. I\ CHISHOlM, Register.
Luce & Armstrong,
Bozeman, M. T-, A tt*ys for Applicant.
Sept.^O BOd. • • • • ------
J^OTICE.
Treasurt Department, 1
Office of Comptroller of the Currency, >
Washington, August 25, 1884. )
Notice is hereby given to all persons who may
bave claims against "The First jîatipnal Bank
Livingston,>' Montana Territory, that the Wine
ni ust be presented to ChgrlPS A, Baker, Receiver,
With the legal proof there«!, with in three months
from this date or they will be disallowed,
J. S. Langworthy,
Deputy and Acting Comptroller ot the Currency.
* (U6t-wl0t)
pms WILLSON,
[Late Register Bozeman Land Office.]
U, S. LAUD ADD MINING ATTORNEY.
Over Sebree, Ferris & White's—same floor with
U. »• Laud Office,
Main Street, Bozeman, Montana.
Mv second term of office having expired, and
my successor appointed,I take pleasure in announ
cing that, with an experience oi eight years as
Register of the Bozeman Land Office, I am pre
pared to practice, and to transact all business that
may properly come before the U. 8. Land Office;
the' assisting of claimants in correctly presenting
their claims for record; the preparation otall pa
pers under the Homestead, Preemption, Timber
Cu ture, Desert, Mineral and Coal Laws; the pros
ecution of contests of every character. Also con
veyances of all kinds made, and abstacts, plats and
g«i»era4iB<®m»aoalanii»tojL WH*0ÖF.
TBB OPPICIAU COUNT.
Election Returns of Gallatin County, Montana,—Election Tuesday, Nov. 4. 1884.
District
Council
County
Probate
County
Clerk &
Del gate
Attorn'y
man
Representatives.
Com'nr.
Judge.
Treas'er
Recordr
Sheriff.
Aseess'r
»
Q
«
a
»
Q
Pt
«
»
»
Q
a
«
»
PS
a
PS
a
PS
Q
PS
ft
PS
D.
PRECINCTS.
m
ti
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Ù
p
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ö
o
S
C
o
00
u
>•
•6
•a
O
a
US
Toole.
Blake.
Vivion
Potter.
OQ
S
hi
<
Wright
"o
O
2
tt
p
o
O
CL
U
«
>>
a
Martin
Ö
2
o
PS
K
8
os

B*
«
M
5
s
u
08
0/
JS
2*
o
a
an
h
hi
£
U
P
o
0
j Black.
j Edsall.
M
08
s
3
0
V
s
o
a
u
s
Bozeman, West...
280
308
290
298
99
480
147
231
155
389
429
38»
330
254
344
213
350
735
338
245
345
238
264
185
Bozeman, East____
121
173
122
170
30
257
57
85
58
218
233
205
163
130
125
149
142
151
146
146
158
132
[21
92
Salesville........
63
72
79
61
17
116
25
76
:>0
72
103
95
70
69
57
81
65
52
66
70
86
0 1
66
65
Monforton's.......
33
18
33
18
6
43
13
30
17
23
38
32
23
23
29
20
33
18
38
13
36
15
31
19
East Gallatin...
65
56
69
51
8
103
15
63
17
70
91
98
49
70
62
54
72
45
84
35
70
48
63
45
West Gallatin.....
10
29
11
27
5
34
5
7
8
32
34
29
8
31
9
30
36
11
28
14
22
9
26
Willow Creek.....
8
39
31
15
10
36
13
13
12
33
34
31
4
41
14
25
12
34
12
34
11
ÜÔ
H
35
Fridley's..........
23
18
29
12
23
17
19
22
22
21
20
17
24
17
23
17
23
18
22
19
30
11
21
2#
Livingston.......
324
333
301
353
56
80
562
559
572
70
86
76
531
124
304
347
330
327
314
335
266
145
491
Sweet Grass.......
16
4
16
4
15
5
15
15
15
5
5
5
15
5
lo
5
11
9
20
.V .
14
b
14
5
Gardiner..........
62
52
29
86
51
65
55
51
57
55
62
56
87
30
56
50
81
35
68
47
63
54
82
32
Flithead..........
13
20
20
14
8
25
9
16
10
21
23
21
14
20
14
19
26
8
22
11
21
13
12
20
Cooke .............
47
30
45
31
51
24
51
52
52
23
24
24
56
19
43
20
60
16
49
24
50
26
57
19
Big Timber........
Hillsdale..........
45
29
52
20
31
34
31
54
31
17
31
32
48
24
47
25
49
24
54
19
46
28
26

9
41
9
41
7
43
7
7
10
40
43
42
9
40
9
38
12
31
21
26
12
37
9
41
Hunter's Springs..
13
13
13
13
10
16
10
14
10
13
13
15
20
6
12
13
13
13
14
12
15
11
6
20
Melville.......!...
36
10
40
6
26
19
36
36
37
10
10
9
m
e
36
10
39
7
37
9
36
10
26
20
Timberline........
89
111
100
96
89
109
94
94
95
102
103
103
lor
97
90
95
98
97
95
103
94
l04
98
99
Chico..............
27
40
25
42
22
33
24
26
29
36
39
39
26
41
24
41
27
40
40
27
34
33
39
24
Shield's River.....
11
20
12
19
7
S3
7
3
10
26
24
19
12
19
11
19
10
21
20
11
12
19
11
20
Richland..........
14
13
15
IS
15
12
17
12
12
9
15
14
13
14
14
13
13
14
11
16
12
15
4
22
Three Forks.......
33
49
35
43
25
48
33
32
35
45
46
43
69
9
59
10
22
55
29
49
35
43
34
42
Gallatin ..........
47
30
52
25
43
32
47
44
47
30
31
29
67
8
49
24
48
26

25
50
27
55
22
Upper Boulder____
6
10
6
10
6
10
7
6
6
10
9
10
6
10
6
10
7
8
ii
5
5
11
4
11
Moreland.. .......
28
19
30
17
33
13
•30
26
29
17
19
16
37
9
35
8
36
21
35
12
36
11
29
6
Mission ...........
23
13
20
15
22
II
20
23
20 !
13
10
14
19
16
23
12
23
12
28
7
28
7
II
23
Cascade...........
27
28
36
19
39
16
43
37
43j
10
13
14
29
26
26
29
35
20
87
IS
37
17
21
34
Totals...........
1478
1578
1520; 1518
1266
1704
1392
1634
I439 I4I0
1588!(47111868
1166
1536
1377I1650
1373
1674 1346
1616
1413
1269
1494
Majorities____
100
....!
2
438!

1
1
702;
159
277
328! '
203
231
For assessor, Geo. Budd, (tad.) got 252 votes; for snrveyor, Green, (rsp.) 1486. Robertson, (dem.) 1543, Robertson
ele:ted; for superintend nt of schools, Miss Hamilton, (ind.) 1485, WyliQ, (rep.) I >51, Hill, [dem.] 481, Miss Hamilton elected;
for coroner, Alton, [rep.] 1683, Foster, [dem.] 1355, Alton elected; for public administrator, Willpon [rep.] 1564, Lindley (dem]
1371, Willson elected; for constitution, 1260, against constitution 879.
Another of the DeYoungs Shot.
San Francisco, Nov. 19.— M. H. De
Young, proprietor of the Chronicle, waa
shot at 5:30 this evening, by Adolph
Spreckles, son of the Hawaiian sugar king.
The shooting took place in the business of
fice of the Chronicle. Spreckels fired twice.
One shot took effect in the arm a little
above the elbow, and the second in the
shoulder. The shooting was the outcome
of an article published in the Chronicle
last Sunday respecting the affairs of tl]C
$ugar Company. Spreckles was
arrested and taken to the sta tion bouse,
The particulars attending the shooting
are ns follows; Mr. DeYoung entered the
business office and passed into his private
office to get some children's books which
he bad purchased, and came out again to
say something to one of the clerks, when
he heard some one say, "Mr. De Y T oung I
would like to see you." He turned aud
almost before he had time to recognize the
person who spoke, Spreckles fired. The
bullet struck him in the ar m above the
elbow. DeYoung who was encumbered
vvitli an overcoat and bundle of children's
books, dashed behind a high desk with
the intention of running from there to his
private office. Before he had time to do
so Spreckles fired a second shot, which
took effect in his shoulder. DeYoung
then made a second dash for his private
office, but in doing so he slipped f?U
on the floor. Spreckles rushed up and
standing oyer him, fired the third shot.
This shot struck the children's books.
The chapces are thaf the boGfcs saved ins
life. The instant that Spreckles fired the
third shot. Geo. W- Emerson, advertising
plerki grabbed a revolver lying in the
drawer of ope of the desks and fired at
Spreckles hitting him in the left arm, but
causing only a slight wound. Before
Spreckles had time to fire another shot, J.
G. Chesley, cashier, sprang from behind
the railing, seized Spreckles revolver and
prevented him from using it. While
Chesley was struggling with him, two
other clerks rushed up and overpowered
Spreckles. A moment after, a police officer
rushed in and arrested him. Emerson the
advertising clerk who fired at Spreckles,
was also arrested. Both were taken to the
city prison. DeYoung was immediately
removed ip a çflb tp his residence, His
vyoupefs which at first were believed to be
slight, proved on examination to be more
aérions than was supposed, and it was
found that the first bullet passed within a
sixteenth of an inch of the subclavian
artery, which, if it had been struck, would
have caused him to bleed to death. Fears
are now entertained that if suppuration
sets in the artery may become effected.
DeYoung remained perfectly cool and at
the present hour is resting easy.
^'o other reason is assigned for the
shooting than that already stated.
Spreckles is 27 years of age. He was re
leased on five thousand dollars bail with
his father, Sir Claus Spreckles as security.
Emerson, the advertising clerk, was re
leased on one thousand dollars bail.
It will be remembered that in 1878 Dr.
Kalloch was a candidate for the office of
mayor of San Francisco, and during the
campaign the Chronicle published an ar
ticle reflecting strougly on the character
of Kalloch which so incensed his son that
be assaulted Chas. DeYoung, then manag
ing editor of that paper, as he was enter
ing a coupe in front of his office, shooting
him several times, from thé effect of
which he died the next day.
Indian Reservation Jollification.
Withiu the past few days, there has been
great rejoicing on the Flat Head Indian
reservation on account of the adjustment
of the long standing claims against the
Northern Pacific railway company. Chief
Arlee and his braves entertained General
Agent D. K. Ford most royally after the
Indian fashion in appreciation of the sat
isfactory manner in which he has settled
a question wluch has assumed a very seri
ous aspect. Speeches wetc ®»de by Gen
eral Agent Ford, Indian Agent Major
Ronan, Chief Arlee and other Indians. At
night bonfires illuminated the mountains
from Evaro to Revalli and the Indians
propose to continue their jubilee for sever
al days longer. They assure the railroad
authorities that they will now be good In
dians and throw no more stones at the
cars, nor place obstructions on the track.
Blown Up.
Near Spokape Falls, the other day one
Sipith and two other men were in a small
building used as a general store owned by
one Fry. Among the micellaneous arti
cles scattered about was a 60 ponnd keg of
powder. Smith was in the act of lighting
his pipe and threw the burning match to
one side. The plug happened to be out
of the powder keg, and the match dropped
into the opening. The mingling of the fire
and explosive created an eruption, Ihc
particulars of which those present were
not exactly able to describe. Two of the
men found themselves outside of the build
ing, or wreck of the building, and strange
say one was without the slightest injury,
and the other only sustained a light abrasion
on one of his ears, presumably received in
passing through the roof. Smith
did not escape so well, lieing near the keg
when the explosion occurred. He wax in
the midst of {he debris terribly burned and
hvmsed. However the doctor considers
his chances for life good.—Spokane Re
view.
Afl Çztrayagaut fiter)',
A special to the New York Tribune
says ; The following story was printed in
a Berlin newspaper called the Toback's
Zeitung: Ex-Governor Warmouth of Lou
isiana has formed, with Lorillard of New
York, a syndicate for the purchase of Cu
ba of Spain for $100,000,000. The island
is to be used fer a sugar and tobacco
plantation. The paper states that
Augustus Belmont, Pierre Loril
lard, James Gordon ^epn^tt, Leland
Stanford, S. L. M. Barlow and John W.
Mackay arc interested in the enterprise.
The sum of $20,000,000 is to be paid in
cash and $5,000,000 to be paid to Spaiq
in annual installments. The Rothschilds,
it is said, will be sureties to the govern
ment for tlie island. It is to be establish
ed on the plan of the Indian company,
and after a term of ten years the island is
to be given over to the United States,
whicli then will have to pay the balance
of the purchase money—$30,000,000—
while the principal sugar and tobacco
plantations will remain in possession of
the syndicate.
Thanksgiving; Proclamation
In conformity with the Proclamait! of
the Presi^en^ of tsetse United States, I do
appoint Thursday, the Twenty-seventh day
of November, instant, as a day of public
Thanksgiving, and I recommend that on
that day the citizens of this Territory rest
from unnecessary labor, and in their sever
al places of public vvoisltip express their
gratitude to Ôod for the blessings bestowed
daring the past year; and not forgetting
the needy, let us of our abundance contri
bute to their necessities, so that the day
may be one of thanksgiving tQ them also.
Ip testimoy whereof, I have hereunto
set my hand and affixed the seal
( I ot the Territory this Eleventh
j 8KAL ( day of November, A. D. 1884,
' and of the Independence of the
United States the One Hundred and Ninth.
JOHN S. TOOKÏR,
Secretary and Acting Governor.
Would Feign Govern Montana.
A Washington telegram says: There are
as many as twenty applicants for the gov
ernorship of Montana, to succeed Gov.
Crosby, who has resigned, and is now fully
at home in Frank Hatton's recent quarters
as first assistant postmaster general. Pres
ident Arthur says few appointments of late
have had so mach attendent pleasure. He
expects to make a selection some time
next week. He will probably appoint
some applicant from within the territory
incompliance with the recommendation of
tbfi Chicago platform. There remaina
about a year of the unexpired term. The
name of Delegate Maginnis is mentioned
frequently for the place, and he president
is urged to step outside the line of the
party and appoint him.
St. John Speaks.
Ex-Governor St. John, who ran for
president on the prohibition ticket, has ju&t
been interviewed at his home at Olathe,
Kan., upon the outlook for the political
situation. He claims emphatically that
he had held no relations with any political
party in the campaign, except the prohib
ition party. That he had made the fight
strictly upon the principle w hich he rep
resented, and he stated his intention of
taking the field again, after a few weeks
rest, and continuing active efforts in be
half of national constitutional prohibition,
which he felt assured would lie ultimately
established.
Crow Reservation.
A mass meeting of the citizens of Yel
lowstone county, held at Billings on the
18th, with every county represented pass
ed the following :
Whereas, It has come to die knowledge
of the citizens of eastern Montana that a
schen\ç H ou fout to lease the western por
tion of the Crow reservation, containing
3,500,000 acres of the richest farming and
grazing lands of Montana,and inexhaustible
stores of mineral wealth and capable of
supporting a population of 100,000 people,
and
Whereas, We maintain that when this
reservation is thrown open it should be for
the benefit and use of only such citizens
of the United States as desire to secure
homes for themselves and their families
and not for the exclusive use of a grasping
monopoly, and
Whereas, Experience has taught that
such a lease would work injustice to the
Crow Indians themselves, as well as to the
white settlers of eastern Montana ; that it
would result in au endless conflict between
the Indians and the cattle men, with ell
the horrors of savage warfare ; therefore
be it
Resolved, By the citizens of the Yellow
stone country, in mass convention assem
bled and representing all the people of east
ern Montana, irrespective of party or busi
ness interests, that we earnestly protest
against any lease being made between the
Crow Indians and any person or persons
having for its object the exclusive use of
the Crow reservation. Further,
Resolved, That we respectfully call ®n
the Honorable Henry M. Teller, secretary
of the Interior, to prevent anj such scheme
from being çiaçr^ effect, Further,
Hssolyedi That we ask H. J. Armstrong,
agent for the Crow Indians, to stop any
negotiations looking to a lease, so far as he
may be able to do so. Further,
Resolved, That we pledge oursçlyes to
one another to resist, tu the extent of our
power, by all lawful means, any such dis
position of the Crow reservation. Further,
Resolved, That a committee be appoint
ed to circulate a petition to the honorable
secretary of the Interior, asking his inter
vention to prevent the consummation of
the proposed lease and to take immediate
action to restore to the public domain such
portion of said reservation as is not actually
necessary to the use of the Indians.
Resolved, that a copy of these resolutions
be sent to the honorable secretary of the
Interior, the delegates in congress from
Montana and Wyoming and Senators
Dawes, Logan, Vest, Cameron and
Morgan.
After appointing committees tocirculate
petitions, forward resolutions and on ways
and means the meeting adjourned amid
great enthusiasm.
Suit Ordered.
A Washington telegram of the 17th says :
The Solicit«: of the Treasury has instruct
ed United Sates District Attorney for the
Middle District of Alabama to bring suit
against the sureties on the bond of General
Adam Badeau, late Consul General at
Havana, to recover $12,000 received by
him as notarial fees and alleged to have
been illegally withheld.
HEWS OF THE WEEK.
A daily democratic paper has made its
bow at Fargo.
Marquis DeCaux, the husband of Patti,
was recently granted a divorce at Paris.
The Continental Hotel at Fargo was
burned on Monday last. Loss $75,000.
A fire at Milbauk, Dakota, on the 17th
destroyed $150,000 worth of property.
Telegrams have been received at Shang
hai of the capture of Tamsin by the
French.
The steamer Elder, which arrived from
Europe on Saturday last, brought $600,000
in gold.
The President has appointed Otis Clark
Commissioner of Pensions, vice Dudley
resigned.
The English government has sent 200
tons of torpedoes to pretect the coaling
stations in China.
Barney Gallagher, who was clerk of the
last Nevada state senate, has gone crazy
from cigarette smoking.
The Texas express company's office at
Galveston was entered on the night of the
16th and the safe robbed of $10,850.
The handsome monument erected in
honor of the battle of Monmouth, at Free
hold, N. J., was unveiled on the 13th.
Joe Cook, a murderer, was taken from
the jail by a mob at Blue Hill, Mo., on
the 17th inst., and hanged to a derrick.
It is estimated the payments from the
Treasury for the present month, on account
of pensions, will amount to $13,000,000.
Mr. I. Martin, editor of the St. Louis
Globe-Democrat, has just been left $25,
000 by the death of an uncle in Scotland.
Daniel Manning, editor of the Albany
(N. Y.) Argus, was married to Miss Mary
Livingston Foyer of that city on Wednes
day.
The mayor of New York has issued an
order to the superintendents of police to
hereafter prohibit glove contests in that
city.
The failures in the United States duriug
last week were 187, against 166 in the
preceding week, and 205 in the corres
ponding week of 1883.
Isaac Henderson, associated with Wil
liam Cullen Bryant in the ownership of
the N< w York Evening Post, died Nov.
13th, at the age of 71.
A destructive fire occurred at Golds
boro, N. C., on the 16th. Twenty-five
business houses were destroyed and the
loss is estimated at $200,000.
Sara McMasters has resigned the posi
tion he has so long filled as superintend
ent of the Homestake Mining company's
great interest in the Black Hills.
A train on the Wabash road was stopped
at Quitman, in northwest Missouri, on the
19th, by 20 masked men, who killed the
messenger and robbed the safe of $1,600.
The wedding of Marshall Orme Wilson
and Caroline Schermerhora Astor, young
est aud only unmarried daughter of Wil
liam B. Astor, took place at New York
on the 18th.
A. D. January, deputy state treasurer of
California, was arrested on the 13th for
appropriating $39,500 deposited for safe
keeping with the state treasurer. The
money was lost in gambling.
The St. Louis cattle convention conven
ed on last Monday with over 1,000 dele
gates in attendance, representing nearly
all ranches and cattle men's associations
west of the Mississippi river.
The sugar refineries ot E. C. Knight &
Co., and McKean, Berie & Co., of Phila
delphia, have shut down, throwing 500
men out of employment. The depressed
condition of th# sugar trade is the cause.
Robert MePheen, alias Bryce, who was
arrested charged with forgery in Calcutta,
is in jail at Louisville, Ky. He admits a
forgery to the amount of $100,000 on the
Calcutta Tea Co., of which he was a di
rector.
A terrible railroad accident occurred at
Hempstead on the Houston & Texas rail
road on the 14th. An express train was
precipitated into the Brazos river. Ten
passengers are reported killed and fifteen
wounded,
While on a voyage from Calito Buena
to Hamburg the ship Andrew Johnson
collided with the British ship, Thirlmere,
on the 12th inst., and sunk with seventeen
of her crew. The latter made port with
the survivors of the Johnson crew.
The Department of State has directed
United States Consuls General at London
and Paris to appoint medical examiners to
inspect all vessels leaving English and
French ports for this country, with a view
of preventing the introduction of cholera.
An amusing feature of the cattle con
vention now in session at St. Louis is a
cowboy band from Fort Dodge, Kansas,
twenty men strong, and in full frontier
costume. The leader wields, in place of
a batton, his silver derringer which is
nearly a foot long.
A number of young children started a
bonfire at Chicago on the evening of the
15th and rolled into it a barrel containing
resin and turpentine. The barrel exploded
with terrifie force, very seriously burning
and injuring six children, five of whom
are not expected to survive.
A band of Chirieahua Indians, rn the
18th inst., raided a ranch in Presido coun
ty, Texas, murdered Mr. and Mrs. Petty,
and carried three children into captivity.
The band comprised about fifty Indians,
who are terrorizing the country and des
troying property as they pass through.
Will E. Haskell, eldest son of
of the Boston Herald, E. B. Haskell, and
one of the new proprietors of the Minne
apolis Tribune, was recently married at
the "Vista Hill," Auburndale, Mass. His
bride was Miss Annie Elizabeth Mason* a
very charming girl, daughter of a well
known Boston journalist who died some
years ago.
The police put a stop to the Sullivan
Greenfield glove fight in New York on
the 18th, in the second round, and arrest
ed both men and took them to the station
house. Sullivan was declared the winner,
having drawu blood from Greenfield's
forehead. On the 19th both men were
indicted by the grand jury for prize fight
ing
Fleming and Loring, who became no
torious a year or two ago on account of
having acquired two or three millions of
property as promoters of a scheme for
dealing in margins on the Board of Trade,
and who were ernvioted of using the
United States mails for fraudulent pur
poses in sending out circulars of their
scheme known as "Fund W," were re
leased from the Chicago jail on Monday,
having been pardoned by the President.
Found Dead.
Billings Post: On Tuesday morning
last the dead body of Mrs. J. Woodruff
was found lying near the railroad traek^
in the vicinity of Caleb Rich's ranch at
Young's Point. In the absence of the
coroner, Judge L. Peavy of Park City,
summoned a jury and held an inquest on
the remains. At the inquest it transpired
that deceased was of unsound mind, and
that she had wandered away from her
daughter's, Mrs. C. C. Tilden's place,
about 4 p. m. of Monday, the 10th inst.
It was at first surmised that she had been
killed by a train, but no bruises appeared
on her person, and none of her bones were
b oken. The jury found that she had
died from exposure aud exhaustion. De
ceased was 76 years of age. '
Important Ruling.
The rule governing undelivered letters
sent from hotels has been heretofore to send
them to the dead letter office regardless
of the printed request to return to the hotel.
The rule has been amended by Postmaster
General Hatton as follows: "Unclaimed
letters enclosed in envelopes upon whicli
hotel cards are printed should not be re
turned to the mailing office unless such
envelopes have written or printed thereon
the words 'return to' in addition to the
hotel card. Proprietors of hotels should
omit the usual 'return' request from envel
opes supplied to their guests, and guests
using such envelopes should be careful to
designate what disposition should be made
of letters sent by them in case they cannot
be delivered.''
Historical Close Votes.
The late situation in New Y'ork has
had frequent parallels in the past. As
early as 1824, in the contest between
Adams and Jackson, there was a differ
ence of only 109 in Maryland's vote on
these two candidates, in favor of Adams.
Four years later that state voted on the
same candidates, and though there were
nearly 25,000 additional votes divided
between them, Adams still led by 1,184.
In 1832, when Clay and Jackson were
the rival candidates, Delaware gave
Clay but 166 more votes than Jackson
got, and in Maryland there was an actu
al difference of only four votes, Clay
getting 19,160 and Jackson 19,156. The
vote in New Jersey that year stood,
Clay 23,392, Jackson 23,856, a trilling yet
all-important difference.of 464 votes.
In 1836, when Harrison and Van Bu
ren were the petitioners of suffrage,
there was a difference in Connecticut of
only 768 votes, in Louisiana, of 270, in
Mississippi of 201, and in New Jersey
of 545.
In 1840, when Harrison ran against
Van Buren, there was a difference in
the vote in Maine of only 411, in Michi
gan of 1,835, in Pennsylvania of 1,345
in a total vote of 287,097, and in Virgin
ia of 1,392.
Between Clay and Polk in 1844 there
were differences in Louisiana of 701
votes, in New Jersey 823, and in Ten
nessee, Polk's home, Clay led him by
just 113 votes.
In 1848, between Taylor and Cass, the
difference between votes for the two
was, in Alabama 981, in Delaware 523,
in Iowa 1,009, in Mississippi 615, and in
Virginia 1,462.
The race of Pierce against Scott in
1852 was correspondingly close in some
states, the advantage being in Delaware
only 25 votes, in Louisiana 1,392, in
North Carolina 686, and in Tennessee
1,880.
In the memorable and remarkable
contest of 1860 Lincoln only had 657
votes the better of Douglas m Califor
nia. In 1864 McClellan got only 612
more votes than Lincoln in Delaware.
In California in 1868 Grant received but
506 more votes than Seymour, and in
Oregon but 164 majority. In 1872 again,
between Greeley and Grant, Delaware
held her party votes within 9p0 of each
other.

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