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The Livingston enterprise. (Livingston, Mont.) 1883-1914, September 05, 1885, Image 2

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LIVINGSTON, - MONTANA
WRIGHT à HENDRY, - Publishers.
SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER 5, 1885.
Entered at the postoffice in Livingston, M.T.
is second-class mail matter.
Private Secretary Lament says the
story of the rupture in the friendly re
lations between President Cleveland and
Mr. Tilden is false, absurd and without
foundation.
About twenty public men of Canada
have had the order of knighthood con
ferred upon them. The honor is getting
almost as common as the title of Col
onel in Missouri.
The Alaska Commercial Company's
payment of £255,000 yearly to the gov
ernment is about three and one-half per
cent interest on the purchase money of
that possession —more than is paid on
a part of our national debt.
The Anaconda Gazette nominates
Hon. AY. A. Clark of Butte as the first
representative in Congress of the State
of Montana. Such indefinitely early
nominations are not wise, beside we sus
pect that such congressional aspirations
as Mr. Clark may have are directed
the senate, a seat in which body his
friends would like to see him occupy
We have received circulars of infor.
rnation relating to the North, Central
and South American Exposition which
is to be held in New Orleans during the
coming winter as the successor of the
Cotton Centennial Exposition. If carried
out according to the plans it will sur
pass the international fair of last winter;
its design has a tendency to strengthen
the national bonds that should unite all
American nations in a great Continen
tial Zollverein.
More than forty steamers leave the
harbors of Buenos Ayres for foreign
ports laden with the products of the
river Platte, the largest component of
which is the political division known as
the Argentine Republic. There are, also^
every month, hundreds of sailing vessels
departing from the same city having
cargoes almost wholly destined to
European ports. Not one of those
steamers flies the flag of our country,
and only one-fifth of the sailing vessels
are American bottoms.
President Cleveland will not get back
to AVashington before the middle of the
month. Away up in the Adirondacks,
a day's journey from any permanent
human habitation, sleeping on the floor
in a log cabin, eating his bread and ven
ison and fish and drinking his coffee
from a slab set on four stakes in the
open air, in his shirt sleeves with his
oldest pants tucked inside his boot legs >
apollinaris w ater his only beverage, w r ith
two friends and a guide or two, our
president is enjoying his holiday and
laying up a store of vitality and health
to carry him through a year of the hard
est work.
A report from AVashington says that
number of army officers whose chief
tperiencein military duty consists in
ixuriating around eastern cities and
rawing their pay and whom Secretary
ndicott's recent order will send to their
■giments, say they will resign rather
îan comply w r ith the order. That is
ice talk for a military officer. Such
ten might be expected to resign rather
îan take the field in time of war. It is
ot probable that any convulsion would
rertake this country in the improbable
rent that they carried out their dire
treat. If they are only carpet knights
is about time the truth were known.
The census of Dakota just completed
ows a population of 263,405 for the
uth half and 152,1119 for the north, or
5,664, for the w r hole territory. In 1880
e total population was 135,177 and the
crease has therefore been 207 per cent,
îe increase in the number of farmers
ice 1880 has been 317 per cent
id in manufactories 320 per cent,
tie territory has over 28 towns
ith over 1000 inhabitants. Thelarg
t towns are Sioux Falls with 7,205
sidents and Fargo with 8,201; Bis
arck, the capital, has only 3,627—not
far behind its ambitious rival, Man
n, which has 2,263. It is a burning
ame that Dakota is not admitted as a
Nation: A Texan lawyer produced
a court of that state the other day a
tition addressed to the county judge,
;ned by a large number of the most
ipectable and intelligent people of the
ice, asking that a leading and greatly
;eemed citizen should be summarily
nged. \Ve need hardly say that not
e of the signers knew what he was
;ning. The petition w as got up and
oduced by way of illustrating the
irthlessness of most American testi
mials to character and fitness—a phe
menon to w'hich President Cleveland's
lent letter is just now calling a good
il of attention. The national good
ture, combined with a very feeble
ise of responsibility for the goodness
the government, is at the bottom of
3 trouble. The number of persons
io cannot bear to refuse a man any
ing except money is very large. The
mber of those w ho agree with George
[., that "a man is fit for any office he
l get" is still larger.
Hon. James Fergus, late president of
the Pioneer Society, in making an ad
dress upon his retirement from that of
fice, took a short spin on his favorite
hobby, infidelity. AVhenever Mr. Fer
gus appears in public it is safe to bet
that his hobby is with him and that he
will bestride it w T ith or without an op
portunity before retiring into private
life. The many to whom orthodoxy has
been an oppression are now equally
bored and annoyed by the preachimr of
heterod >xv. It •me be no great pleasure
to have arrived at period non-belief in
revealed religion if the non-believer is
weighed dow n with an itching to corner
up his fellow beings where they cannot
escape and fire broadsides of infidelity
at them. Free religious thought has
distinct meaning in our mind—the right
to
for every man, woman and child
think as he may please without the
dominating influence of priestcraft
and it is doubtful if the priests of infi
delity are any improvement upon the
other kind. Hon. Mr. Fergus is verging
upon the sere and yellow' leaf vulgarly
called dotage and it might be well for
some friend who enjoys his confidence
to tell him that the public dislikes to
worried in season and out of season by
his atheistic importunities
Some of our territorial contempora
ries in discussing the proposition of the
Bismarck penitentiary authorities to
board Montana's surplus convicts at a
reduction from their present cost are
opposing the plan on the assumption
that it is a scheme to fill the Bismarck
penitentiary and ask the U. S. authori
ties to enlarge that building. The pris
on at Bismarck was built by the terri
tory on an appropriation made the year
when the legislature located public
buildings at every prosperous town in
Dakota. All the same the Enterprise
opposes the scheme. AVe hope Montana
has not yet reached the ebb where she is
forced to call upon sister territories to
help her out—not just yet. Speaking of
that Bismarck prison, w r e w T onder how
Montana would feel if the next legislat
ure should get together and make ap
propriations for a university at Deer
Lodge and another at Glendive; an in
sane asylum at Livingston and another
at Missoula; a penitentiary at Billings
and another at Dillon; a college of agri
culture at Bozeman, a school of mines
at Butte, a state normal school at Vir
ginia City, a school of navigation at
Fort Benton and a training establish
ment for aspiring stockgrowers at Miles
City; and to add a finishing touch should
appoint a commission empowered to lo
cate a capital and pledged to locate it at
Helena. That is about the way they did
in Dakota. AVhen we consider that
memorable assembly of sages from the
land of the Dakotas we feel as if there
w'ere depths which Montana's latest
legislature did not think of attempting
to fathom.
The announcement is made that Ben
Butler, the professional agitator and
persistent poser for public notice, is
about to sue the government of the
United States in the person of President
Cleveland on behalf of the lessees of the
Indian lands which have been ordered
to be vacated. He says (or rather he
put the words in the mouths of bis
friends) that he is himself interested in
the leases beside representing millions
of money invested by his clients. He
further says that the lands will not be
vacated except at the end of a long pe
riod of litigation. Old Ben is a bluffer
of the most pronounced description and
has frequently made his policy win. He
is also a fraud of the most despicable
stripe; his life has been an alternation
or a combination of corruption for the
benefit of his private purse and of dra
matic appearances to win public fame.
This last move is one of the combina
tions of his two ruling passions. He
and his clients want to instigate litiga
tion that will delay the removal of their
cattle; the history of great American
lawsuits is sufficiently notorious to war
rant the belief that if the cattle were
left in the Indian territory until the
courts gave the inevitable decree that
they must go, a half dozen generations
of beeves would be fattened on the
leased grass. Old Ben is also anxious
to keep himself before the people, and
hence his move to sue the president and
tell the newspapers all about it. But if
we mistake not the order to move those
cattle means business and w'ill be en
forced, Ben Butler to the contrary not
withstanding.
Bismarck's well-defined German colo
nization policy has brought forth two
or three important developments during
a few days past. The Caroline Islands
or Micronesian Archipelago are a
group of almost innumerable islets
situated in the eastern Pacific Ocean near
New Guniea. They are of coral forma
tion and many of them are surrounded
by coral reefs. The population is a mix
ture of Papuan negroes and Malays
numbering probably 200,000 and not
long ago they were addicted to canni
balism with a pronounced choice for
white missionaries. The Spaniards
have long claimed the Carolines but
have done nothing to assert supremacy.
There are very few white colonists. A
few weeks ago the Spanish govern
ment gave notice of its intention to
take possession of these islands but
before the plan could be effected a
German naval force had landed
upon the principal islands and offered
to repel all intruders. About all that
Spain oould do was to retire. About
the same time a German protectorate
was established over a portion of the
coast of Zanzibar in Africa, the sultan
of that country not objecting for the
very fair reason that a battery of German
artillery was pointed in the direction of
his palace. A rumor is also circulated
that it is Bismarck's intention to take
possession of Cuba, but in this an
American reverence for the Monroe
doctrine may prove a barrier. Germany
hardly ready for a war with the
_ nited States yet; she can bluff Spain
but America will not permit it at present.
the proprietorship of Cuba should be
transferred it would not be to another
European powder without a forcible
protest. ___________
A Physiognomic Paule.
Spokane Falls Review : When you size
up a Ghinaman's honesty by the breadth
of his chüd-Iike smile you getieft.
According to statistics collected by
the laitbnor; Sun, out of 3.377 murders
committed last year iu tin- United Slates,
the perpetrators were punished with
death jn only 313 cases, and 210 of these
perished by lynch law. Only one murder
in 33, therefore, is hung according to
law in this great country, and one in
about 15 by irregular methods. Ten out
of eleven escaped the gallows altogether.
Lynching is a sure and safe method, at
any rate. AVhere it is practiced justice
does not miscarry.
Alluding to his Yellowstone Park
excursion of 1883 a newspaper writer
reports the following language from
Rufus Hatch: "I had railroad passes
for every mother's son of my company,
yet that picnic cost me .$35,000 in cash.
I didn't ask the boys to spend a penny,
and you can gamble that none of 'em
pressed me to allow them to. Besides,
while I was gone, I got on the wrong side
of the market, and went hopelessly
lame before I got back. I lost 8460,000
on that trip."
Only Circus and Menagerie
TO BE HERE THIS YEAR.
LIVINGSTON,
FRIDAY,
.18
JOHN R0BIKS0FS
50 CAGE MENAGERIE 50
3
CIRCUSES ft
AND <
RINGS ! Ü
And Enormous Elevated Stage.
10-BIG SHOWS COMBINED—10
..*x. >
B
$2,000,000 toesteä in flus Enter]« !
$300,000 Novelty Street Parade,
$100,000 expended in New Features, 1,000 Men and
Horses employed, 50 Cases of Rare and Costly
Wild Animals, IS Sun-Bright Colossal
Chariots !
TUILA FAMILY!
of T nicvcle Riders and Skaters on Stilts! ZEXO
BIA, hurled 300 feet by the Catapult!
ZOLA, ON HER VELOCIPEDE,
60 feet in Mid-Air;
ELLA ZOLA, walking on Stilts on a three-quar
ter inch wire, 60 feet above the heads of 10,000
people; ADIA dives 100 feet to the ground
below; ZELA shot from the Cannon!
GRACE, THE TATTOOED WOMAN!
Giant Horse, 31 hands high; Giant Ox, larger
than an Elephant; Giant Camel, 19 hands high;
Unicorn, with 3 separate eyes and 3 dis
tinct horns: $40,000 double-horned
lîliiTHicftrns !
X.
$30,000 FLOCK OF OSTRICHES
$19,000 White Nile Hippopotamus; $5,000 Pair of
W'hlte Bears: $5.000 Pair of Royal Bengal
Tigers; $5,000 Dan of Performing Lyons:
Leopards and Hyenas : $5,000 Flock of
Kangaroos !
110 Male and Female Artists !
And Mere Animals, Features and Novelties than
any Two Shows Combined!
Cheap ExeurSions on all Railroads.
-ALSO EXHIBIT
Helena, Sept. 16.
Bozeman, Sept. 17.
Billings, Sept. Id
Admission, - - $1.00.
TW T 0 PERFORMANCES.
ESTABLISHED 1867.
Diamond Jo Line
STEAMERS.
UPPER MISSISSIPPI PACKET LINE
This company dispatches each week three of their
elegant passenger packets
FROM ST. F'ALJ! _ for
Red Wing, Winona, LaCrosse, McGregor, Du
buque, Davenport, Rock Island, Burlington,
Keokuk, Quincy, Hannibal, Louisiana,
Clarksville, Alton and
ST. LOUIS,
connecting at St. Louis with steamers of "Anchor
Line" for Memphis, Vicksburg, Helena and
New Orleans.
The Favorite Route, South, East, West.
Less heat and no dust, smoke or cinders to
annoy. Our
FIRST - CLASS RATES INCLUDE
Meals and berth on steamer, therefora, no extra
expense for sleeping car and meals. Rates as low
ana in some cases lower than via any rail line.
Via this route yon view to best advantage the
famed scenery of the Mississippi River, passing
through Lake Pepin and the noted Government
canal and locks at the Des Moines Rapids.
Through Tickets can be procured in St. Paul
office via river and rail to principal interior rail
points.
Freight rates at all times lower than via any rail
line. A. G. LONG, Agent, St. Paul,
Dock opposite Union Depot.
JO REYNOLDS, Pres. FRED A BILL, G. P. A.
E. M. DICKEY. Snpt. and G. F. A.
|y General Offi ce, D nbuque, Iowa.
C. 8. HEFFERLIN, Agfcnt, Livingston.
!
of
!
J. H. HARVAT & CO.,
MEAT MARKET!
* v -i/ïâüæ - ■ UUv *
W'holesale and Retail Dealers in
All Kinds of Fresh Meats at the Lowest Prices
SPECIALTIES :
Sausage Cut by Steam Power.
Choice Kettle - Rendered Lard.
JOHN H. HARVAT & CO,,
Main Street, Livingston, M. T.
PARLOR RESTAURANT!
B. C. ROGERS, Proprietor,
Main Street, - - Livingston, M.T.
The neatest and best place to get a meal in Livingston.
The table is supplied with every delicacy of the season,
all cooked in the best style.
BOARD, $6 PER WEEK.
Meals, 25 to 75 cts. Families supplied with Ice Cream by
the quart or gallon.
M- EE. BOUGHTON,
Wholesale Dealer in
Pure Kentucky Whiskies !
AND BEST BRANDS OF CIGARS,
Both Imported and Domestic.
TOURIST'S TRADE ESPECIALLY SOLICITED.
GARDINER, MONTANA.
Sebree, Ferris & White Co.
— DEALERS IN
HARDWARE!
Iron, Steel, Nails, Rope, &c.
Blacksmith's and Miner's Outfits,
Tents, Wagon Covers, &c.
Building Material,
Binder Twine,
Road Scrapers, Pumps, &c.
at Prices that Cannot be Beaten in the Territory.
— AND ALL KINDS OF —
Agricultural Implements,
MOLINE AND OLIVER CHILLED
PLOWS !
NORWAY STEEL TOOTH AND SPRING TOOTH
HARROWS !
GRAIN DRILLS AND SEEDERS,
CHAMPION
MOWERS AND CORD BINDERS,
Tiger and Hollingsworth HAY RAKES I
BAIN WAGONS!
Racine Spring Wagons, Buggies, &c.
—ALSO A FULL LINE OF—
Wagon WoodSto ck, Wagon & Machine Extras, &c.
ORDERS BY MAIL RECEIVE PROMPT ATTENTION.
SEBREE, FERRIS & WHITE CO.
PARK STREET, LIVINGSTON, MONTANA
C. H. Carver & Co.'s Column of Facts and Figure«.
!
G. H. CARVER & CO.'S
MEDICINE TALK.
F
On the first of August we began selling goods at greatly reduced rates, but
strictly for cash. The result has been very flattering as our sales have steadily in.
creased, notwithstanding some croakers have said that it was impossible to do busi
ness on a casli basis, on account of the closeness of money, but we notice that when
the people are offered extra inducements in the way of good goods at unprecedent
ed low prices they will manage to rustle the monej-, in order to take advantage of
a good bargain.
It is amusing to watch the opposition squirm, and to note some of die tricks
they will resort to in order to squeeze out of the tight place our low quotations
have forced them into. For example, we quote prime long, clear bacon at 10 cents
per pound and to get around this some of the little dealers will take their customer
into a little dug-out which thej- .siyle a cellar to show their bacon. The cute little
dealer will have one side of bacon which he has sifted a little dirt onto (easily
brushed off), and will speak his little piece as follows in answer to the customer's
assertion that "Carver & Co. are selling bacon at 10 cents per pound :" "Well, if
you want 10 cent bacon I have it,"—pointing to the dirty side—"but this bacon"—
referring to the clean pile—"cannot be sold at less than 12*^ cents. Of course you
can take your choice, but I prefer to sell you the best, as 1 only ship the other in to
meet the 10 cent price."
Well, friends, the cute little dealer is simply dealing out lies to you at 2}£ cents
per pound and is systematically robbing you by a mean subterfuge, as bis bacon u
all alike and all came out of the same case. How long will the people of this lo
cality be duped by the penny-ante dodges of these Jim Crow dealers.
G. H. CARVER & CO.'S
ADVERTISEMENT.
We want the people of this locality to understand—1st, that we have the LARG
EST STOCK of
GENERAL MERCHANDISE
ever shown in this town. Our
MAMMOTH BRICK STORE,
containing three floors 25xS0 feet each,
being packed fro .11 Basement floor up with a choice select
ed stock of Standard goods, consisting of
STAPLE AND FANCY 6R0CERIES,
Dry Goods, Boots & Shoes,
Ladies' and Gent's Furnishings,
READY-MADE CLOTHING, &c. in endless variety,
2nd, That we are selling the above stock at at Bed Rock
prices for cash.
3rd, That we have, for the past three years, done four
fifths of the business in town and mean to do nine-tenths
in the future.
GROCERIES
we are selling at prices which makes the opposition fairly
howl, and wipe the clammy perspiration from their brows
which ache with agony as they cudgel their brains, trying;
to think how they shall hold out a few weeks longer under,
the fearful strain we are putting onto them by selling—
a
Bacon, long clear, per pound, at 10 cts.
Soap, White Russian, at 16 bars for $1.
Tomatoes, 3 pound cans, per case $3.20
Coffee, Arbuckle, at 6 pounds for $1.00-tt
Salt, per barrel,...................4.201
Flour, Belle of Jamestown, ^ sack. 3.3.V*
And all staples in proportion, which we warrant to be Standard A No. 1 goods
DRY GOODS AT CHICAGO PRICES.
Clothing at $7.00 Per Suit and Upwards : also
Downwards.
NAILS:—5 Per Cent under any Dealer in Town.
* ffp
Giant Powder, Caps and Fuse, Tea of
our own Importation, Ac., Ac.
Come and see us. We have the goods and want yoUU
money hut will keep you smiling while here and one-haliffl
way home, as you think of the great bargains you have PI
struck at Carver & Co.'s. How do we accomplish all thes%
wonders? Easily enough,—by a simple turn of the wrist-Sj
which takes in the cash as fast as the goods go out. Yes-1
we do it with our little cash system.
i
Yours for Business,
Gr. H. Carver & Co.

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