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The Livingston enterprise. (Livingston, Mont.) 1883-1914, June 26, 1886, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075261/1886-06-26/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOL. 4.NO. 4.
LIVINGSTON, MONTANA, SATURDAY, JUNE 26, 1886.
PRICE 10 CENTS
pringjitsn
LIVINGSTON,
UEO. H. WEIGHT,
MONTANA.
Publisher.
SATURDAY, JUNE 26, 1886.
si Bf'CBirTION RATES—PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
year.....................................$3 50
six months...
'flirt*!* months
>jn^h' copies
......... 2 00
......... 1 25
......... 10
y jüe Jennie A. Henderson is authorized to re
, rive an<l receipt for subscriptions to the Weekly
Ksteui'KISK at Mammoth Hot Springs.
JOHN A. SAVAGE, JOHN H ELDER,
^SAVAGE & i-I.I) ER,
® LAWYERS,
Practice in all tlie Courts of the Territory,
have Ifeal Estate and insurance Departinete
LIVINGSTON, MONT.
Receive applications for Northern Pacific lands
»nil for Livingston property. The same are sold
[or purtcasli and balance on long time.
.1
OBEUT I). ALTON, M. D.
SrnuEoN Northern Pacific R. it. Co.
jQ Ii. PERRY,
PIIYSICAN AND SURGEON.
LIVINGSTON, * MONTANA.
Office in Orschel Dro's. Block, Park Street.
Bank of Livingston
STEBBINS, MUND & CO.,
Livingston, - - Montan«
Transacts a
GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS.
Exchange on all the principal cities of the
United States and Europe.
Interest Allowed on TIME DEPOSITS
Collections made a specialty. Correspond
ence solicited.
ASSOCIATED BANKS.
Stock-growers National, Miles City.
First National Bank, Billings.
First National Bank, Buffalo, Wyo'g.
Merchants National Bank, Deadwood, D. T.
Stebbins, Mund & Fox, Central, D. T.
Stebbins, Fox & Co , Spearfish, D. T.
A. L. LOVE Cashier.
Lower Main Street
FEED CORRAL,
Billy Miles, Prop.
BALED HAY, CHOP FEED, WHEAT and
OATS for sale by the pound or
in CAR LOTS.
Best of care given to all Stock placed in my
are. Prices Reasonable
Lumber ! Lumber !
At the Montana Lumber Co.'s old Stand.
LUMBER, SASH, DOORS,
MOULDINGS,
Pickets, Lathi Shingles, Building Pa
per, (Plaster Paris, Plastering
Hair, Etc., Etc.,
Agents for Bodine and Keystone Roofing. Office
opposite skating rink.
GORDON BROS.
JAS. A. CLARK,
Proprietor of the
National M Livery,
Feed and Sale Stables*
Hacks and Carriages With or With
out Drivers.
Male Horses, Pack Horses, Guides and Camping
Outfits furnished when desired. Also operate thé
Cooke Stale and Express Line.
Parties wishing to make a tour of the Park com
fortably, will do well to call at the office of the
Woite Barn, Mammoth Hot Springe, Wyoming.
Livingston Roller Rink !
GEO. KNIGHT, Manager.
Open Wednesday and Saturday
Nights.
New Features of Entertainment, New Attractions
and a Good Band of Music in Attendance.
SATURDAYS
the Rink will be open for school children.
HTX cordial invitation ie extended te all._^gf
L P. FEED STABLE!
SECOND STREET,
NELS ON & A NDERSO N, Proprietors.
Full Rig Carriages and Saddle Horses for
flic accommodation of the public at
reasonable terms.
Horses Bought and Sold.
Stock Boarded and cared for by the day,
week or month.
JOHN BAMFORD,
carpenter and builder.
JOBBING A SPECIALTY.
flnd Sjjecifications for any
■wsof building furnished on application.
Shop on Second St..
Li VINgsTON, . . MONTANA.
als
The
NORTHERN PACIFIC
■■ RAIIjROATI
50
00
25
10
RAILROAD
The direct line between
SAINT PAUL,
MINNEAPOLIS,
Or DULUTH,
And all points in
Minnesota, Dakota, Montana,
Idaho, Washington Territory,
OREGON,
British Columbia, Puget Sound and
ALASKA,
Express Trains Daily, to which are attached
PULLMAN PALACE SLEEPERS
AND
ELEGANT DINING CARS.
NO CHANGE of CARS
BETWEEN
ST. PAUL *»» PORTLAND
On any class of Tickets,
EMIGRANT SLEEPERS FREE.
The only all rail line to the
YELLOWSTONE PARK!
Full information in regard to the Northern Pa
cific lines can be obtained free by addressing
CHAS. S. FEE,
General Passenger Agent, St. Paul, Minr
Minneapolis & St. Louis
R A I l_ W A V
AND THE FAMOUS
ALBERT LEA ROUTE.
Two Through Trains Daily
From St. Paul and Minneapolis to
CHICAGO
Without Change, connecting with the Fast
Trains of all lines for the
tS^EAST AND SOUTHEAST
The direct and only line running Through Cars
between St. Paul, Minneapolis and
at
his
Line' to Watertown, D. T.
SOLID THROUGH TRAINS BETWEEN
MINNEAPOLIS, ST. PAUL ST. LOUIS
and the Principal Cities of the Mississippi Val
ley, connecting in Union Depot for all points
south and southwest.
MANY HOURS SAVED linsîSï
TWO TRAINS DAILY to ISANCAC PITY
LEAVENWORTH and UnllDAD Ul I I,
ATCHISON, making connections with the Union
Pacific and Atchison, Topeka & Sante Fe R'ys.
{3F""Close connections made with all trains of
the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba; Northern
Pacific; St. Paul and Duluth Railways, from and
to all points NORTH and NORTHWEST.
m The Trains of the Minneap u »o «.
St. Louis Railway are composed
----iortable day coaches, magnificent Pullman
our justly celebrated PALACE Î1IMG CARS
150 LBS. of baggage checked free.
Fare always as Low as the Lowest! For Time
Tables, Through Tickets, etc., call upon the near
est Ticket Agent or write to
S. F. BOYD,
GenTTkt. & Pass. Agt., Minneapalis, Minn.
DES MOINES, IOWA,
via Albert Lea and Fort Dodge. Also "Short
the
at
has
Don
of
eral
the
the
were
with
S. F. BOYD,
GenTTkt. & Pass. Agt., Minneapalis, Minn.
Minnesota & Northwestern R. R. Co.
Chicago Si St. Louis Short Line.
!
MINNEAPOLIS
#8T.PAUL
JNcratrana
1 Kenyon
I Dodge C.
^Austin
VLyle
Minnesota
*
jJorthiatestern
Railroad,
AND
Connections.
*Mona
Manly \
Jlr. Je- 1
*<■
&
o
Waterloo -
Independence / .
aDptniWMe, B 'r
s<«<ë^^ar»han^|(ubuquo
Cen -xSRr town
GrlCneUQvJdontojuma
ikaloosa,
Hedrick
o
DES KOINES
Centre V,
jeeporr"
oirecton - 1
Oregon
fcochett**
Keithaburg
Glenwood 1
K
\ Kirk s ville '
Macon C.
CcntrallmX
r ,c o
KANSAS >.
CITY V
PtOnr.CR PRESS, ST
ST.LOUIS
The only line in the Northwest running Pullman's
ELEGANT BUFFET SLEEPERS and com
bination SLEEPING and CHAIR CARS.
Popular Route to Chicago ami the East.
Short Line to St. Louis, Kansas City, St. Joseph,
Atchison, Leavenworth, Galveston, San Frahcisco
and all California points, New Orleans and Florida
RAYMOND DUPUY, H. M. LITTELL,
Gen'l Agent. Gen. Pass. Agt.
JOHN O. SAX & CO.
NEWS AND FRUIT DEALERS,
AND CONFECTIONERS.
The latest eastern Dailies, Illustrated Journ
als and Magazines always on hand.
MAIN STREET.
COSMOPOLITAN HOTEL,
FRANK HOBBS, Proprietor,
COOKE, - - - MONTANA.
First Class in every respect, and Special
Attention given to accommodation of
the Traveling Public.
BOARD AND ROOMS.
Anyone wanting Board and Room, in a nice quiet
place, should call at the
WINONA HOTEL,
The CHEAPEST and BEST place in the City.
Lower Main Street.
M. A. STOEL, Proprietor.
and
HEWS OF THE WEEK
James A. Kirk, the famous Chicago
soap man, is dead.
Henry Ward Beecher has gone to Eng
land on a lecturing tour.
The president oi^ Thursday vetoed
twenty-nine more pension bills.
Hobart Pasha (August Charles Hobart)
marshal of the Turkish empire, is dead.
A call for $4,000.000 three per cent,
government bonds Was issued on Monday.
A fire near Modesto, California, de
stroyed 3,000 acres of wheat. Loss, $50,
000 .
Fifty thousand acres of crops and two
villages were destroyed by floods in Hun
gary
In accordance with the law passed last
year, 25,523 slaves have been declared free
in Cuba.
An epidemic has struck the jack rabbits
in Nevada, and they are dying off by the
hundreds.
Jacob Swingley at Creston, IU., cut the
throats of his two small cildren and then
commited suicide.
The Missouri Car and Foundry works
at St. Louis were destroyed by fire on the
18th. Loss, $300,000.
A Hoboken man sold his wife to a
neighbor for $20, but was unable to col
lect on the note given.
Thirty persons were injured at Busli
nell, Illinois, by a wind storm which
overturned a circus tent
Riegel, Scott & Co., wholesale dry
goods merchants at Philadelphia, have
failed. Liabilities, $750,000.
Providence, Rhode Island, celebrated
the 250th anniversary of the settlement of
that city with great ceremony.
Mrs. Storey's lawyers have petitioned the
court to remove Mr. Patterson as business
manager of the Chicago Times.
The photographers of the United States
and Canada held their seventh annual
convention in St. Louis this week.
Justice Stanley Matthews was married
at New Y T ork City, on Wednesday to Mrs.
Mary K. Theaker of Cleveland, Ohio.
Judge David Davis is so seriously ill at
his home in Bloomington, Illinois, that
little hope is entertained of his recovery.
A monument in memory of Col. Shaw,
commander of the first negro regiment in
the late rebellion, will shortly be erected
at Boston.
The firm of Yallop, De Groot & Co.,
dealers in tailors 1 trimmings, St. Paul,
has assigned. Liabilities, $60,000; assets,
$45,000.
An affray on board the American bark,
Don Justo, at Colon, resulted in the death
of three persons and the wounding of sev
eral others.
A St. John dispatch ot the 19th says
the French brigantine Michael sank on
the Grand Banks, and nine of her crew
were drowned.
By the capsizing of a ferry boat on the
Lozawa river at Prague, Bohemia, fifty
persons were thrown into the river and
number drowned.
Tlie English cutter yacht Galatea,
are
near
Co.
Tlie English cutter yacht Galatea,
which will contest for the America's cup
with one of the big American sloops, will
sail for New York to-day.
The senate has ratified an extradition
treaty with Japan, and one for the rc-sur
vey of the boundary line between the
United States and Mexico.
Owing to the labor troubles several
large stove manufacturing companies have
closed their works at Troy, New York,
and will remove to other cities.
Controller Durham, who has been a
widower eight years, was married last
week to Mrs. Conter, a granddaughter of
the late Gov. Fletcher of Kentucky
Col. J. W. Strong, editor of the St
Joseph (Mo.) Herald, was assassinated in
his office by Dr. S. A. Richmond, who
immediately shot himself, although not
fatally.
The firm of Swift & Co., importers of
sugars, New York City, have failed. The
liabilities are $1,000,000, which it is
claimed is more than equalled by the as
sets of the firm.
Eli Owens, confined at Hebron, Ne
braska, on a charge of rape, was taken
from the jail by fifteen masked and armed
men and after being badly beaten was
hanged to a tree.
A San Francisco firm has a monopoly of
the grain bag trade and has raised prices
100 per cent. The newspapers now urge the
farmers to stack their grain and thresh it
when bags are cheaper.
The territorial supreme court of Utah
has affirmed the judgment of the lower
court in sustaining the right of the ap
pointées of Gov. Murray to the offices of
territorial auditor and treasurer, against
the Mormon hold-over incumbents.
After a six weeks' attempt to force
manufacturers to accede to their demand
for the adoption of the eight-hour role,
the furniture makers of St. Louis have
ended their strike and the men, about 500
in all, have returned to work on the old
plan.
Wm. Kelaher, alias "Reddy," a gam
bler, killed Officer Convey at Detroit,
Minnesota, on Wednesday while resisting
arrest. He was taken from jail the same
evening by a crowd of disguised men,
hung to a tree and his body riddled with
bullets
A general strike of all street car drivers
at Minneapolis was inaugurated Sunday,
the cause being the prohibition made by
the company against the drivers sitting
down. The strike was ended Tuesday by
President Lowery acceding to the demands
of the strikers.
President Cleveland on Tuesday sent a
check for the full amount of his expenses
at Deer Park to the Baltimore Jk Ohio
railroad company. In the letter enclos
ing the check the president expressed his
appreciation of the attention himself and
Mrs. Cleveland had received.
A Nogales, Arizona, dispatch says: Ad
vices from Magdalena, Sonora, state that
the Mexicans attacked fifty Apaches in
Tecapodepe Pass, Saracache. The Indians
were defeated. It is believed several bucks
were killed who were carried off. One
squaw is known to have been killed. The
Mexicans lost three killed and one wound
ed.
A secret circular has been issued by
General Master Workman Powderly, of
the Knights of Labor, in which the
Knights are warned against what he con
siders a plot to pack the convention to be
held in Richmond next October with poli
ticians, and in which Mr. Powderly claims
to have discovered a great conspiracy
which is on foot to disrupt the order by
underhand means.
A Panama dispatch of the 18th says:
A terrible affray occurred at Bogota, the
capital of the republic, between the
guards at the prison and members of one
of the national batallions. One general,
several officers and thirty soldiers were
killed. The affray is looked upon as the |
outcome of an old grudge between the ]
guards and the soldiers, without any pol
itical significance whatever.
At the meeting of the gn ud lodge of
Knights of Pythias of Dako % held last f
week at Rapid City, the following officers
were chosen for the ensuing year: Past
Grand Chancellor, George J. Love, Huron;
Grand Chancellor, Lawrence Connell,
Deadwood ; Vice Grand Chancellor, Dr. I
A- D. Daniels, Mitchell; Ginnd Prelate,
F. E. Ketchum. Huron; Grand Master at
Arms, W. R. Arnold, Watertown; Grand
Master of Exchequer, J. Wellman, Cham
berlain; Grand Outer Guard, Jacob W.
Ganiz, Rapid City.
1-7 1
MONTANA NEW8.
Bradshaw & Gugim of Butte sold their j
colt Gondolier at the Salt Lake races for
$3,000.
A party of gold hunters is being organ
ized at Butte to visit the gold fields of
Australia.
as
Miss Pauley was adjudged insane atl
Billings on Friday last, and sent to the
territorial asylum at Warm Springs.
m, -, . . .
The mail service between Dillon and
Bannack, via Argenta, has been mcreased
from a tri-weekly to six times a week. po
The president on Tuesday nominated
Samuel Gibson of Pennsylvania to be
agent for the Indians of the Fort Peck
agency. be
Rising Sun : Robt. S. Ford and Tom
Clary have purchased the mavericks of
the Sun River round-up, paying $21.50
per head.
Rev. Camilus Imode, noted for his work
arnong the Indians since I860, was fonnd P®
dead in his bed at Helena on the 18th, of
heart disease.
The twelve horses recently stolen from I ^
the Parrot company at Butte, and the men I ,
who stole them, have been captured at
Mount Idaho.
A match game of cricket between the I
Butte and Three Forks clubs for the
championship of Montana wif be played
to-day at Butte : *»nd
on
the
a
to-day at Butte :
The Republican convention of Miamula
county is fixed for August 28th, and the
primaries for August I4th. There will be
forty-six delegates.
_ . ° ...
Indians m the vicinity of Stevensville
are reported to be dying off rapidly from
scrofula, over seventy having been buried
witlun tlie past two years.
A postoffice called Burson has been es
tablished at Mountain House, half way I
between Thompson Falls and Murray,
Idaho, with Geo. Burson as postmaster.
Chronicle : Enoch Hodson informs us
that he has completely closed down all
work at his mill and will not start up un
til his matters are adjusted with the gov
ernment.
Mrs. Lizzie Lee, who was so severely M
burned in the Oregon House fire at Butte,
in her attempt to rescue her baby from |
the burning building, died from the effects
of her injuries on Friday last.
The new barracks and officers' quarters
at Coal Banks are completed and ready
for occupancy. Coal Banks will here
after be known as Camp Otis, in honor of
the colonel commanding at Assinaboine.
Angus McDonald, whose leg was
broken by the fall of a pile-driver near
Rimini, and who was taken to Helena for
treatment, died on Sunday and on Tues
day was buried by the Knights of Labor.
Dennis Manton was last week pardoned
out of the penitentiary by Governor Hau
ser, on the representation of prominent
caurt officers that the evidence against him
was insufficient to warrant his conviction.
The store and stock of goods belonging
to Tong Hi and On Kee, Chinese mer- 1 on
chants doing business at Helena, were at-1
tached on Monday through the Merchants' I
National bank of that city on a claim for
$2,300.
Inter Mountain : The Yellowstone val
ley of Montana is filling up rapidly with
a superior class of immigrants—most of
them have money, and all of them have in
dustry, intelligence and pluck, which are
much better. I
The Westlake house between Butte and
Meaderville, about one mile from the I
former place, was destroyed by fire on the
Wednesday night. The building was a
two story frame structure. Loss $4,000, j
covered by $3,500 insurance.
A fire at Billings on Monday morning
destroyed a small house belonging to Mr.
Lovatt. The building was occupied by
Sam Hall, who had been "baching" there,
but had gone to his work. The fire is
supposed to have originated from embers
left in the stove.
J. H. Conrad has leased in the North
west Territory 200,000 acres of land from
the Dominion government, upon which he
will drive this season 10,000 head of cat
tle and 200 head of Oregon mares. The
lease is made for a period of twenty-one
years at two cents per acre.
The first herd of cattle ot the season
from the lower country, 1,400 head, be
longing to Kellogg & Stearns, arrived at
Miles City on Monday, having been driven
from Cheyenne river, Dakota, to be turned
loose on the north side of the Yellow
strne, about seventy-five miles from that
:)lace.
Yellowstone Journal : " Bad T-nnd
George" was in town yesterday. He in
tends to send his plan of the Custer bat
tle-field (which, by the way, is said to be
very perfect) to Chicago to be litho
the
the
first
ing.
in
at
of
The
was
but
ing
In
ing
ment
The
by
of
the
be
graphed. George was among the first to
visit the battle-field after the massacre
and is well acquainted with the various
points.
Stockgrowers'Journal: J. S. Day and
C. A. Dole left this week for Camp Clark,
Nebraska, where they are to receive a herd
if 3,500 two-year-old heifers which, under
the management of Milt. F. Henderson,
ohey will put on the trail for their ranges
tn Custer county. The cattle are expected
by to arrive at their destination about August
15th.
Thomas B. Pierce, a miner employed
on the 400-foot level of the Anaconda
mine, was killed on Thursday by a cave
of about half a ton of rock upon him.
The body just above the hips was almost
pulverized. He lived about an hour,
| He leaves a wife and two children at
]
of
Butte, his other relatives all living at
Cornwall, England. The coroner's jury
exonerated the company from all blame
Information is wanted by William Bis
f choff, of New York, regarding his brother
Alfred, one of the owners of the Red Chief
mine, near Melrose, who it is feared has
been foully dealt with. His friends are
anxious to learn something concerning his
I movements since last January, and will
reward any person who furnishes them
facts. Address: Editor, American-Swiss
Gazette, 79 Ann ssreet, New York City.
T a - j a ™ ,,
L.52?n!ft nt L ^ aUace > w,1 °
S5 n , e J °.® th ® territorial honors for the
1 West Point cadetship, sent a telegiam yes
terday from West Point to his brother,
William Wallace, Jr, announcing the fact
that he had passed the West Point exam
ination and was in barracks on the Hud
son. He passed the physical examination
j
on Monday, the 14th, and the examination
as to mental acquirements commenced on
Wednesday and closed on Saturday.
Ar ^- There will undoubt
S?. 1 * low sta S e of wate r in the
Missouri this season, in consequence of
which we learn that part, if not all, the
WO ol j n the Wolf creek country will be
hauled to Judith Landing, from which
po int bo ats can take it out 6 no matter how
late it may arrive. Last season there
were 650 sacks of wool shipped from that
point. This season there will probably
be 2,000 sacks, or in other words, 500,000
pounds.
Husbandman : We learn from J. C.
Hussey that quite a large party of his
Chicago friends contemplate ao extended
tour of Montana this summer. They ex
P® ct *° sail down the mighty Missouri
from Gallatin City to the Great Falls and
return to White Sulphur Springs via the
I ^ d aDd picturesque canyon of Smith
I , nver ' . a " d aft ? r s P endin g several weeks
is
said
here visiting the caves and other points of
interest, as the season draws to a close will
I SET* a largc P art * ,0 do ,be W,tion " 1
' ^
Gazette: Sheriffs
an
by
time
trade
for
the ' ^
Gazette: Deputy Sheriffs Barney, Reed
*»nd Vaughan returned last evening from
fetf' 'fl 'ï'™
the ^ " T 8 ï' 2* * be cha, ? e s, f lln =
be • T,
ba taken ,0 Wh'le Sulphur Springs, as the
offence was committed in Meagher coun
ty. Reed and Vaughan were after Arm
strong and McRea on a horse-stealing
charge, but the authorities in Wyoming
refused to give them up until they have
been tried for killing a cow belonging to
I H. C. Lovell.
Butte Miner: On the 26th of last April
a 13-year-old boy named Harry Nichols
us "played hookey" and went to the Odd
Fellows' picnic at Anaconda. Since that
date the boy's parents have neither seen
nor heard of him, and a systematic search
of the city has failed to discover him. He
M 8 13 years old, has brown hair and eyes,
an ^ w hen he left home was dressed in a
| 8U ^ dark-colored clothing, straw hat.
navy blue shirt and laced shoes. Any per
son knowing anything of the boy's where
abouts will confer a favor on the uneasy
parents by communicating with Sheriff
Sullivan. Territorial exchanges please
copy.
Independent : The following rates
have been arranged for transportation
from Helena of members of the G. A. R.
and kindred bodies who desire to attend
the reunion in San Francisco during the
week beginning August 20th : Via Union
Pacific and returning same way, $45 ; via
Union Pacific, returning via steamer to
Portland, thence via Northern Pacific,
$57.50; via Northern Pacific and Port
land and returning same way, $57 50
Also a rate covering exactly the same
transportation, of $51.50, but including
1 on steamers from Portland to San Fran
cisco and return sleeping accommoda
I tions especially prepared for Grand Army
delegates, and almost as good as first class
cabin accommodations and equally as
comfortable,
The prisoners in tlie Lewis and Clark
county jail made an attempt to escape by
filing their way out of the chilled steel
cells last week, but were frustrated by
I Under Sheriff Hathaway who caught
them at work. They had* made fine pro
I gress by working days and painting over
the filings to stand official inspection.
Common flat files were used, of which
j tour were found. A penknife blade was
found shoved into the sole of a shoe on
the foot of a prisoner with teeth cut into
the back. Two feet of a gas pipe was
found in a cell, with which the cut bars
were to be forced, and with which the
jailor was to be knocked down when he
first appeared in the corridor in the morn
ing. All are now ironed and locked up
in dark cells.
The Lake Shore Strike.
The Lake Shore switchmen, employed
at the Union stock yards in Chicago, quit
work on Wednesday, owing to the refusal
of the company to discharge the eight ob
jectionable men, on whose account the
strike of sixty days ago was inaugurated.
The switchmen at Englewood and all
along the line joined the strikers and no
trains were allowed to move. An attempt
was made in the afternoon to move a train
but was unsuccessful owing to the at
tacks of a mob which succeeded in ditch
ing a part of the train and seriously in
juring the conductor and a brakeman.
In consequence the Lake Sboie is refus
ing to accept any more livestock for ship
ment over its road.
to
of
the
is
is
in
of
the
has
ious
fore
to
at
at
They Stole Ranch Supplies.
A special of the 21st to the Indepen
dent, from Miles City, says: Upon re
ceipt of a telegram from the sheriff of
Sundance, Wyoming, deputies Hicks and
Conley yesterday arrested three men and
a 14-year old boy, charged with stealing
ranch supplies from various ranchmen on
the upper Belle Fourche. Sheriffs Ryan
and Butterford, of Sundance, arrived here
this morning and will leturn with the
prisoners to-morrow.
Coach Upset.
Billings Gazette, 21st: This morning
as the Benton coach was leaving the depot
heavily loaded with passengers and ex
press, the horses started to run, and turn
ing short the coach upset opposite the
new Belknap building. The driver, Fred
Nelson, was thrown on a heap of stones
and hurt his back. Mrs. F. A. White, of
Fort Benton, who occupied the seat with
the driver, was badly cut about the head,
and a soldier had his foot wrenched in
the wheel, the heel of his boot being tom
off. The other passengers were unhurt.
A Suspended Bucket Shop.
T. W. Kane & Co., the firm of alleged
commission merchanls who opened an
office in Helena sevend months ago, sud
denly closed their business on Friday of
last week, victimizing their customers
who had deals pending with them. The
total amount of their liabilities in Helena
is about $1,200. Tlie men originally
came from Chicago and claimed to repre
sent the firm of C. W. Lithgow of that
city, when in fact they represented the
firm of J. B. Martin & Co., who state that
they owe Kane & Co. nothing. Sidney
Butler, the junior member of the firm,
skipped on Saturday for the west, leaving
Kane to bear the brunt of the storm.
Some of the transactions of the firm are
said to be criminal, and legal proceediags
against them are threatened.
Suicide at lleleua.
On Friday of last week Frank Bartos,
an old-timer of Helena, committed suicide
by shooting himself in the head with a
38-calibre revolver. Bartos was at one
time at the head of the jewelry trade in
Montana, but had retired from the city
trade and of late years had visited sur
rounding camps and was supposed to be
doing a remunerative business. The cause
for the rash deed is attributed to family
troubles occasioned by an unfounded
jealousy of his wife, the result of mental
aberration produced by a fall from a
horse about ten years ago. He was a Bo
hemian by birth, about 53 years of age,
and had resided in Montana since 1866,
coming to the territory from Colorado.
He was buried by Helena Lodge, No. 3,
A. F. and A. M., of which order he was a
member.
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The Suffering People at Vancouver.
A special from Vancouver, the city at
the terminus of the Canadian Pacific,
which was completely destroyed by fire
last week, says: Notwithstanding the
urgent appeals for aid which Mayor Mc
Lean has sent by wire to the principal
towns and cities of the dominion iu the
east, and several of the larger cities of tlie
United States, contributions are reaching
here slowly. The supply of food and
money is exhausted, and despite the care
ful husbanding and distribution of sup
plies a great deal of distress and absolute
want for the necessaries of life still exists
and prospects for an increase of the mis
eries of destitution, as the relief commit
tee have expended their last resources.
The mayor to-day made further and more
urgent appeals for immediate assistance
by wire, and unless these solicitations
bring substantial responses quickly, it is
feared that the list of casualties of the fire
will be supplemented by loss of life from
sheer starvation.
Returned From the Promised Land.
Yellowstone Journal: Billy Andrews
has just returned to town again after an
extensive trip with three of four others to
the range of the Home Land and Cattle
company, in the vicinity of the Woody
mountains in Canada. While there they
did some little surveying aud located the
positions of the various ranches which
are to be erected. Tlie eountry is said
to be an exceedingly fine one, abundance
of grass and plenty of good spring water
the year round. For a summer range it
is hard to be excelled, and its close prox
imity to the mountains of course affords
plenty of natural winter shelter. Timber
is somewhat scarce. The party paid a
visit to the Woody mountain post and
found it untenantable. The few mounted
police who are quartered there are living
in tents, but will shortly move to within
twenty-five miles of the line, where a new
post is to be built, and the number
of the mounted police force to be sta
tioned there will be increased.
In Serious Trouble.
Dillon Examiner: Many persons in
Montana will remember a Mrs. Emma
Malloy, who some time since became
quite well known as a peddler of female
articles of various kinds. The following
dispatch from Springfield, Missouri, to
the Fort Wayne Gszette shows that she
has become involved in a couple of ser
ious difficulties in the former place :
"Mrs. Emma Malloy was arraigned be
fore Judge Geigher of the circuit court
F
of
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fail
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of
and entered a plea of not guilty. For
instigating bigamy the bond was fixed
at $300, arid for being accessory after
the fact to the murder of »Sarah Graham
the bond was fixed at $800. Her bond
was signed by Judge Baker, H. F. Fel
lows, R. A. Clark, C. M. Everson, S. R.
Milner, T. J. Porter, A. E. Howell, G. I.
Rathbun, M. J. Southworth and A. P.
Harwood, whose combined wealth is
over a quarter of a million."
The Clarke's Fork & Cinnabar Railway.
On motion of Mr. Butler the senate
took tip the bill to grant the right of
way to the Cinnabar & Clarke's Fork
railroad company throngh a corner of
the Park on Monday last. Senator Vest
vehemently opposed the bill by a speech.
Mr. Bntler did not agree with Mr. Vest
but yielded to a suggestion to let it go
over until Tuesday. The bill has not
been called up again, however, and
nothing further has been done.
Bound to Go Visiting.
Omaha special: Reliable information
from the Rosebud agency states that
Chief Two Strike and 500 Sioux braves
are still determined to make their pro
posal visit to the Crows in Montana
and the Shoshones iu Wyoming, against
instructions from Washington and the
agent's orders, and will start in a few'
days. Gen. Brisbin, commanding at
Fort Niobrara, says that troops will be
sent after them to bring them back if
they go without permission. It is feared
serious complications will arise if this
should be done.
Wholesale Poisoning:.
A Philadelphia dispatch says: Exactly
215 people were poisoned at last Thurs
day's picnic near Flemington, N. J. Six
of these will probably die, and twenty
are in a precarious condition. One of
the physicians in charge of the cases has
examined the ice cream cans and says
there was not enough sulphate of zinc
about them to do any damage; that the
symptoms are those of arsenical poison
ing, and from the fact that those who
first ate of the cream escaped he is of
the opinion that the poison was put in
the cream by some one purposely. As a
large number of people were engaged in
serving the cream, it will be difficult to
catch the perpetrators.
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Fatal Flames at Boston.
A terrific fire destroyed the New Eng
land Institute Fair building at Boston
on Monday and resulted in the loss of
several lives. The building was built
by the New' England manufacturers'
and mechanics' institute for exhibition
purposes, at a cost of half a million dol
lars, but had been purchased by the
Metropolitan street railway company
and was used for storing and repairing
cars. There were many men inside the
building when the fire broke out, most
of w'hom were assisted to escape through
the îear windows. After the flames
had been sufficiently extinguished search
W'as begun among the charred ruins for
possible victims and eight dead bodies
removed, most of them burned beyond
recognition. Inside the building were
400 horse cars, each worth $700. The
repairs and refurnishing of the building
amounted to about $50,000. The total
loss is about $400,000.
Ruins of Old Trading Posts.
River Press : The American Fur
company were the pioneer traders in
this section of the country, and ruins of
their forts are very numerous. James
Kipp built a trading post at the mouth
of the Marias as early as 1831. Fort
Brule was built on the Brule bottom
(now the ranch of James Rowe) in 1832,
and was occupied for seven years, until
Fort Lewis on the south side of the
Missouri, near Pablo's island, was com
pleted in the summer of 1844, when Fort
Brule Avas burned. In 1846 Fort LeAvis
Avas abandoned and Fort Benton built.
A fort was built just above the mouth
of the Judith, on the north bank of the
river, by T. A. Clardon, but Avas burned
Avhen Culbertson built Fort Lewis. As
the American Fur company became
rich and prosperous other traders came.
Robt. Campbell built Fort Campbell on
the ground now occupied by Murphy,
Maclay & Co.'s upper warehouse, and
F ort Labarge stood in Roosevelt's field.
There were other trading posts of minor
importance built on the Marias and at
other points.
Missoulian: A couple of weeks since
the editor of the Missoulian wrote to
Delegate Toole calling his attention to
the distress likely to result to a number
of the citizens of this county from the
recent rulings of the general land office
in regard to school and other public
lands. A reply Avas received from Mr.
Toole this Aveek in which he says: The
general land office has held lately that
school lands are public lands within the
meaning of the order relating to fenc
ing public lands. I hope, however, to
secure a modification of that ruling so
J far as it relates to lands already occu
pied and improved in good faith by
those who acted upon the Avell under
stood idea, that their occupancy was
lawful and that they would have the
preference of the purchase when these
lands were put upon the market. If I
fail in this, I will endeavor to procure
the necessary legislation for the relief
of such persons.
"My love," said a wife tondly, "am I
not to have that beautiful dress pattern I
spoke of?" "Be patient, my dear," he re
plied, "I will only say there is a surprise
in store for you." "In store for me," she
snapped, "that's where it will stay. A
real surprise would be something for me
at home."

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