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The Livingston enterprise. (Livingston, Mont.) 1883-1914, October 20, 1888, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075261/1888-10-20/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOL. 6. NO. 21.
LIVINGSTON. MONTANA. SATURDAY. OCTOBER 20, 1888.
PRICE 10 CENTS
S£ivin$0tan (Entriprfer,
LIVINGSTON.
/ISO. H. WRIGHT,
MONTANA.
Publisher.
VTURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1888.
ith*.....
iionths..
KATES— TA Y ABLE IN ADVANCE.
........................... $8 00
"........................... 1 50
......................... 1 00
".......................... 10
II
ONKY
OANKD
At ?ix per.cent. per annum.
VMEKICAN BriLDING AND LOAN
Association.
Vi riior.izED Capital, $50,001,000.
H MtvKU, President.
" E °' \vm. Thompson, Vice jires't of local board
n money on town and farm property, interest
t°* n at six per cent per annum.
- (l , rl „9 and applications apply to
f SAVAGE A ELDER,
Attorneys and Agents, Livingston, Mont
F
IliANK hlnri,
Attounk'
A T- L A W JA ND.N OTA BY PUBLIC.
„Will practic
in all Courts of the Territory.
M.
n rear of National Park Hank, Livingston.
\ WILLIAMS,
NOTARY PUBLIC,
{It'S COAL MINE, - MONTANA.
K J). ALTON. DR. W. II. CAMPBELL.
LIVINGSTON, MONTANA.
Off.'
t'.TDf
it in the National Park Bank building
Main and Park streets.
»1.1. 1 NS, M. 1). W. L .SIIAWK, M. I».
COLLINS & SIIAWK,
'IIYSICIANS AND SURGEONS.
Livingston,
Montana.
i»fti,,> over Sheards Gun Store, Park etreet.
Tails promptly answered night and day.
8.
M. PARKS,
general insurance agent,
Office in rear of Poetoftice Building,
LIVINGSTON, MONTANA.
M'
LIA WETZSTEIN,
Teacher ok the Piano Forte System
it» per Conservatory of Music, Stuttgart, Germany.
rÿ~IJeginners and Advanced Scholars
Taught ._gg ___
ALLAN R. JOY,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
NOTARY rum.ic.
Money to Loan.
insurance and Heal Estate. Sole Agent for
Riverside Town Lots,
K, P Railroad Lots and
K P. Railroad Lands
I', s. Land Office business a specialty.
yyli. W. C. SEHLBREDE,
DENTIST,
n»? permanently located in Livingston First
class operations performed, and satisfaction
guaranteed. Office in Krieger building, Main St
i.
JOHN A LUCK.
L" K
LITE.
& LUCE,
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW,
BOZEMAN, - - - MONTANA,
attend the Courts of Park County.
II1IX A. SAVAGE,
Countv Attoraey.
JOHN It. ELDER,
Receiver 1st Nat»l Bank
SAVAGE & ELDER,
LAWYERS
and Notaries Public.
MONEY LOANED
On Real and Personal Property.
REAL ESTATE.
Have property to sell in all parts of Livingston
mil audit ions.
Receive applications for
park,
PALACE and
MINNESOTA Addition»*
N. P. R. R. LOTS.
l\ S. LAND OFFICE BUSINESS.
'apers for tilings on public lands made.
LIVINGSTON, MONT.
national Part Baal
OF LIVINGSTON.
WM. m. WRIGHT, President,
j- s. THOMPSON, Vico Pres,
c. H. STEBBINS, Cashier.
E - H. TALCOTT, Asst. Cashier.
BOARD OF DIRECTORS :
Wright,
, Thompson,
A KKIEGKR.
E. GOUGIl N OUR.
GEO. T. CHAMBERS,
A. W. MILES.
C. II. STEBBINS.
GENERAL banking business
TllANSACTED.
1 lln gf- on all the principal cities of the
United States and Europe.
IE S*8T Ai .lowed on TIME DEPOSITS.
* °L].kct,ox8 Promptly Attended to.
JjIVIXi.stoN
Operative Building and Loan
Association
Aident R. Law. Sec . E . H. Talcott.
\ ico-Pres't Jah. McNaughtoh.
r ' aH I*. Hoopes. Attorney A. R. Joy.
J- 'of lar îmo.tings on the fourth Monday even
street h raonth » Dodson Building, Main
JOHN O. SAX,
^ewsand FRUIT DEALER,
and confectioner.
*J»I
*Ä tea ! U ' rn belies. Illustrated Journ
0 M *gazines always on hand.
MAIN STREET.
NO CHANGE of OARS
U BETWEEN
AST. PAUL.»PORTLAND
On any class of Tickets,
EMIGRANT SLEEPERS FREE.
The only all rail line to the
IELL0VVST0KE PARK!
NORTHERN PACIFIC
The direct line between
SAINT PAUL,
MINNEAPOLIS,
Or DULUTH,
And all points in
Minnesota, Dakota, Montana,
Idaho, Washington Territory,
OREGON,
British Columbia, Puget Sound and
ALASKA,
Express Trains Daily, to which are attached
PULLMAN PALACE SLEEPERS
AND
ELEGANT DINING CARS.
Full information in regard to the Northern Pa
cific lines can he obtained free by addressing
CHAS. S. FEE,
> General Passenger Agent. St. Paul, Mini
Minnesota & Northwestern E. R. Co.
Chicago & St. Louis Short Line.
MINNEAPOLIS
8T. PAUL
Minnesota
*
Tfarthwestcrn
Kanuolph
Red
A
Nerstran
Kenyon
Dodge C.
Austin
Railroad,
tP
O
O
Connections.
Ilona
y
k v
Msnty
V,. Jc -
<s>
Waterloo
»
*•/
/
Independ
larshalTCWj
- town
fw"Montezuma y
ROskaloosai)
ÿWlIclriek gf
■to
nuque
r^Tcepor
State
Cen
GriCnellW
X o\
DES BOISES
Centre V
'O
orreston
Oregon^
i MoeUcU®
Kcithsbur
V
Glenwood
K
-
y - PEORIA
Kirksville
V
PJ Macon 0. 11
.ACjwxwgton Je.^v ^
7) ^v\ ^^^[Warrc
^KANSAS v\
cityV ^
Gil
1ST.LOUIS
PRESS, ST. PAUL.
R.
S
The only-line in the Northwest running Pullman's
ELEGANT BUFFET SLEEPERS and com
bination SLEEPING and CHAIR CARS.
Popular Route to Chicago and the East.
Short Line to St. Louis, Kansas City, St. Joseph,
Atchison, Leavenyvorth, Galveston, San Frahcieco
and all California points, Neyv Orleans and Florida
J. A. MacGKEGOR. J. A. HANLEY,
Trav. Ft. and Pass. Agt. Traffic Manager,
St. PanL Minn
NO OTHER RAILWAY IN THE NORTHWEST
has in so short a period gained the reputation
and popularity enjoyed by the 'Wisconsin
Central Line- From a comparatively un
knoyvn factor in the commercial world, it has
been transformed to an independent, influential,
grand Through Route, yvith magnificent depots,
supurb equipment and unsurpassed terminal fac
ilities . Through careful catering to details, it has
yvon for itself a reputation for solidity, safety
cinvenience and attention to its patrons, secont
to no railroad in the country. Pullman sleepers,
models of palatial comfort, dining cars in yvhich
tue cuisine and general appointments aie up to
the highest standard, and coaches especially built
for this route, are among the chief elements
which have contributed towards catering success
fully to a discriminating public. Located directi
on its line, between Minneapolis and St. Paul, and
Milwaukee and Chicago, and Duluth and Milwau
kee and Chicago, are the following thrivingeities
of Wisconsin and Michigan: Neyv Richmond,
Chippewa Falls, Eau Claire, Ashland, Hurley-,
Wis., Ironwood, Mich., Bessemer, Mich., Stevens
Point, Neenah, Menasha, Oshkosh, Fond du Lac,
Waukesha, and Burlington, Wis.
For detailed information, lowest current rates,
bei ths, etc., via this route, to any point in the
South or East, apply to nearest Ticket Agenf, or
address
Wm S. Mellen» James Barker,
General Manager. Gen. Pass. & Ticket Agent
MILWAUKEE.
F. II. Hanson, Northyvestern Passenger Agent,
No. 19 Nicollet IIouseBlock, Minneapolis, Minn.
LEGAL BLANKS.
The ENTKRrnisE Office now has oir hand all
ot the following Blanks at the prices quoted,
75 Cts. per Doz., or 50c Half Doz:
Liens,
Ranch Claims,
Warrantee Deeds,
Deeds of Mining Claims,
Water Right Declarations,
Extension of Chattel Mortgage,
Notice of Mining Location,
Quit Claim Deeds,
Chattel Mortgages,
and Mortgages.
Affidavit of Reresentation of Quartz Lode.
Leases.
Not©0
Satisfaction of Mortgage at 50 cent» per dozen
or 30 cents per half dozen.
Also, a full line of Probate Blanks.
Anv Blanks not kept in stock will he printed
and supplied on short notice when ordered.
Mail Orders promptly attended to.
GEO. H. WRIGHT.
N. I MO,
Barber and Hair Dresser,
Hefferlin Blocx, Main Street.
TIIE MOST EXPERT WORKMEN EMPLOYED
B. O. GRIFFITH,
BLACKSMITHING
AND WAGON MAKING.
All kinds of repairing done neatly and promptly
to order. Special attention given to
NonetbMi«g aod MaUif Stock Broods.
Shop, Lower Main Street near Billy Miles* Bro
THE CITY HOTEL,
GARDINER. MONT.
MRS. GEO. WELCOME, Prop.
Best of accommodations for the traveling public
GEORGE IVELCOME,
PROPRIETOR OF
SALOON IN CONNECTION,
— WITH —
Milwaukee Keg Beer
ON DRAUGHT EVERY DAY.
GARDINER. - - MONTANA.
K OP P.—Meets every Friday evening in
• Thompson's Hall. A cordial invitation is ex
tended to visiting brothers.
„ A . W. MILES, C. C.
E. n. TALCOTT, K. of R. and S.
Yellowstone Lodge No. 10, Livingston, M. T.
E STRAYED.— A small bay pony, with star
in forehead, and right hind ankle white,
branded R A on left shoulder. A reward of $5
will be paid for information leading to its recov
ery, or $10 for its return to E. D. Conger, Liv
ingston, or to D. N. Ely, Pine creek ranch.
N OTICE OF DISSOLUTION.-The co-partner
ship heretofore existing in the tailoring
business between M. J. McGinnis and B. Andrus,
at Livingston, Montana, has this day been dis
solved by mutual consent. All persons knowing
themselves indebted to the aforesaid firm are re
quested to call and settle their accounts with me,
M. J. McGinnis, as I collect all bills due said
firm and pay all obligations of satd firm.
Dated Oct. 12, 1888. M. J. AIcGinnis,
B. An obits.
the week, for the year 1889; said proposals to
include and cover the entire cost of feeding,
clothing and nursing of the said sick, poor ana
infirm, and all burial expenses thereof. Said
bids shall be addressed to the Clerk of Board of
County Commissioners, and will be opened De
cemher 3rd, 1888. D. P. VAN HORNE.
Clerk of Board of County Commisssioners.
first pub. Oct. 6-4t.
N OTICE FOB PUBLICATION.—Land of
fice at Bozeman, M. T., Aug. 27,1888—Notice
is hereby given that the follow ing named settler
has filed notice of his intention to make final
proof in support of his claim, and that said proof
will he made before the judge of the 3d judicial
district, or in his absence before the district
clerk of said district, at Livingston, Park county,
M. T., on Saturday, October 20, 1888, viz: William
H. Francis, who made homestead entry No. 582
for lots 3 and 4 and S. E. \ of 8. W. \ and S. W
»4 of ij. E. % Sec. No. 30, Tp. 1 N. R. 10 E. He
names the following yvitnesses to prove liis con
tinuous residence upon, and cultivation of, said
land, viz: John É. Gustine, Owen P. Dabney,
John Martin and Louis Brooks, all of Livingston,
Montana. GEO. W. MONROE, Register.
, [First pub. Sept. 1,1888]
N OTICE FOR PUBLICATION. - Land Office
at Bozeman, M. T., Sept. 18, 1888. Notice
is hereby given that the following named settler
has filed notice of his intention to make final
proof in support of liis claim, and that said proof
will be made before the judge of the Third judic
ial district, or in his absence before the clerk of
»■i of N. E. and N. E. ? 4 of 8. E. l 4 of section 5,
tyy p. 2, south of range 10, east. He names the
following witnesses to prove his continuous resi
dence upon, and cultivation of, said land, viz. :
Charles F. White, David C. (iard, Don L. Willard
and Maurice Roth. GEO. W. MONROE,
(1st pub. Sept. 22, 1888.) Register.
N OTICE FOR PUBLICATION.—Land Office
Ot Bozeman, M. T., Sept. 20,1888.—Notice is
hereby given that thefolloyving named settler has
filed notice of hia intention to make final proof in
support of his claim, and that said proof will be
made before the judge of the Third judicial dis
trict court, or in his absence before the clerk of
said district court, at Livingston, Montana, on
Monday, Nov. 5, 1888, viz. : Napoleon Ebert, yvho
made il. E. No. 580 for the S. W. of sec. 32,
twp 1, south of range 10, east. He names the
following yvitnesses to prove his continuous resi
dence npon, and cultivation of, said land, viz. :
George H. W right, William H. Philbrick, Solomon
R. Shrake and George H. Carver, all of Living
ston, M. T. GEO. W. MONROE, Register.
(1st pub. Sept. 22,1888.)
S
EALED PROPOSALS invited for coupon
bonds of the County of Park, Montana Ter
ritory: The Board of Commissioners of said
County hereby give notice that they will sell to
the party or parties offering the highest price
therefor by sealed proposals, coupon bonds of the
denomination of one thousand (1,000) dollars
each, to the amount of twenty thousand (20,000) dol
lars,issued by- authority of the act of the Legislative
Assembly of said territory apprqved March 6th,
1883, and the acts amendatory thereof, and bear
ing interest from January 1st, 1889, at the rate of
seven (7) per cent per annum, payable semi-annu
ally. Said bonds are redeemable' in in fifteen (15)
years and payable in twenty (20) years after the
date thereof. Bids therefor will be opened on
November 15th, 1888, at 11 o'clock a. m., lat the
office of tiie Clerk of said Board in Livingston,
Montana Territory. Provision will be made for
the redemption of the coupons in Neyv York City,
By order of the Board of County Commission
ers of Park County, Montana Territory.
D. P. ŸAN HORNE, County Cleek.
first pub. oct. 6-6t.
He
tic
der
is
rest
on
that
was
N OTICE TO CO-OWNERS of "Elevator Lode,»'
New World Mining district, Park county,
M. T. ToE. Sperling, tyvo-ninths; Louis Spe'r
linar, one-ninth, and Silliman & Sliitar, one-third;
to their heirs or assigns, part oyvnersin the above
named mining claim. Also to T. E. Noble, half
oyvner In the "Little Kidd" mining claim, New
World Mining district, Park county, M. T.—You
are hereby notified that I, Harry Ga'esert, have in
accordance with section 2834 of the revised stat
utes of the United States, expended in labor and
improvements upon tiie above named mining
claims, for the year ending December 31, A. D.
1887, the sum of one hundred and one dollars
($101) npon each of said claims. Yon, and each
of yon, are hereby notified that unless you con
tribute your proportion of such expenditures, ta
gether with interest and costs, within ninety days
of the complete service of Notice of Publication,
all your right, title, interest and claim in and to
the above described quartz lode mining claims
yvill become the property- of the undersigned, your
Co oyvner, who has made the required expendi
ture as required by law in such cases.
IIARRY GASSERT.
(First publication Ang. 18, 1888.)
N OTICE OF ELECTION.-To tile qualified
electors of the proposed City of Livingston,
yvho are freeholders within the territory embraced
in the petition to the Board of County Commis
sioners of the County of Park, praying for a cen
sus of said territory: Notice is hereby given
that on
Tuesday the 20th day of November, 1888,
an election yvill be held at Hosford's office, a
place within the limits of said territory, which is
described as follows, to-vvit: The north half and
the southwest quarter, and the northwest quar
ter of the southeast quarter and lots one and tyvo
of Section Thirteen, of Township Two South, of
Range Nine East. The south half of Section
Twelve, the Southeast quarter of section Four
teen, the West half of the Northwest quarter, and
lots one and two of Section Twentv-fonr, Town
ship Tyvo Soqth, qf Range Nine East, and the
southeast quarter of Section Seven, and lots one,
two and three of Section Eighteen, of Township
Two South, of Range Ten East. To deter
mine whether the above described territory shall
lx incorporated as a city of the second class, to
be known as the Ciiy of Livingston. The ballots
used at said election shall be "For Incorporation"
• "Against Incorporation."
Bv order of the Board of County Commissioners
of the County of Park.
It Attest-' D. P. VAN HORNE, County clerk
[No. 42.]
SUPPLEMENTAL NOTICE OF
A pplication for patent-u. s. Land
Office, Bozeman, M. T., Oct. 4, 1886.—No
tice is hereby given that James B. Martin, whose
jostoffic-e address is Hudson, Wisconsin, has this
lay filed supplemental notice of his application
for a patent, under the ruling of the commissioner
of the general land office, for the purpose of cor
recting an error in the description of the prem
ises hereinafter described, in the original notice
of said James B. Martin's application for a pat
ent for said premises, viz. : The placer claim
hearing gold (heretofore knoyvn as the "Campbell
& Doty'») situate in Emigrant mining district,
Park, late Gallatin, county, Montana, in sections
11 and 14, toyvnship 6, south of range 8, east (part
ly surveyed), P. M., Montana, and described in the
official plat and field notes on file in this office and
In general land office, as survey No. 5Ö, and asfol
lows, to-wit : Beginning at its southwest location
corner, at a stone (in south west said section 11)
marked 1-59 for corner No. 1, from which the Q
section corner on south boundary of section 11,
township 6 south, range 8 east, hears sonth 88
degrees, 32 minutes, 15 seconds, east 1,660 feet dis
tant; thence sonth 69 degrees, 55 minutes, 30 sec
onds east, 2.591.1 feet to a stone marked 2-59 for
corner No. 2 , thence north 40 degrees, 15 minutes
east, 644 feet to a stone marked 8-59 for corner
No. 3, tbence north 55 degrees, 45 minutes west,
500 feet to a stone marked 4-59 for comer No. 4,
thence sonth 75 degrees, 48 minutes west, 200 feet
to a boulder marked 5-59 for corner No. 5, thence
north 70 degrees 10 minutes west, 2,250 feet to a
stone marked 6-59 for corner No. 6, thence south
11 degree, 57 minutes west, 611.1 feet to place of
beginning. Corners Nos. 2, 3,4 and 5 being in
northeast Q of said section 14 (not surveyed) and
comer No. 6 in southwest M of said section 11
(surveyed), magnetic variation 19 degrees east,
containing 39.2« acres, (supplemental notice post
ed thereon October 1, 1888). The location of this
mine is recorded in the recorder s office of Galla
tin countv, Montana, on page 2 of Book 2 of Min
ing Claims, and transferred to records of Park
county, Montana. Adjoining claimants are the
Glidden & Schaffer placer on the south and east,
and the C. C. Tadlock placer on the west. AH
persons holding adverse claims thereto are re
quired to present the same before this office with
in sixty days from the first day of publication
hereof,'or they will be barred by virtue of the pro
visions of the statute.
GEO. W. MONROE, Register.
J V. Bogebt, Att'y for Claimant.
(First publication hereof Oct. 6,1888j
in
of
on
of
of
in
ex
C.
T.
star
$5
Liv
dis
re
me,
said
NEWS OP THE WEEK.
One dozen out of 265 immigrants
landed at Castle Garden by steamer
Eatiopia from Glasgow this morning,
were found to be destitute and without
friends or relatives m this country and
were detained to await the action of the
collector.
to
ana
Said
of
De
of
582
:
It is stated that Manager Stone of the
Burlington road, as the result of a recent
conference with his striking engineers
has consented to all demands except that
for the abolishment of classification, and
that the long strike will probably be set
tied at the convention of the Brotherhood
at Richmond this week.
The postoflice department is soon to
have a new style postal card. It is very
much like a double card of the present
pattern. The back folds are split diag
onally and open out like a four pointed
star. The four corners are folded and
joined in the center, when the card is
ready for mailing, with a piece of gum
med paper. The card weighs less than an
ounce and will contain no more writing
than the present card, the only advantage
being a greater privacy.
The Pacific mail contract has been
signed between the Imperial Government
and the Canadian Pacific Railway Com
pany. Tenders for three steamers will be
received within one week. The stipulated
service is to commence within eighteen
months, company receiving annually £45,
000 from the Imperial Government, in ad
dition to the £15,000 from the Dominion
Government for a monthly service for ten
years from Vancouver, not only to Yoko
hama and Hong Kong as first intended,
but also calling at Shanghai.
By an accident on the Lehigh Valley
road Tuesday six persons were killed and
twenty wounded. A construction train
was unloading ties at Taraand siding, on
the Pottsville branch, when a fast Penn
sylvania freight dashed into the construc
tion cars. Of the party of Hungarians at
work unloading ties six were killed and
twenty-six wounded. A brakeman of the
Pennsylvania train was killed and twenty
freight cars were wrecked. It is feared
that many of the wounded, who had to
wait three honrs before help came, will
die.
Mayor Reno attempted to commit sui
cide at Harrisburg, Pa., on October 12th.
He placed a revolver in his mouth and
was about to pull the trigger when a
'riend grasped the weapon and prevented
him. The cause is attributed to domes
tic troubles. It is believed that he is
crazed by drink. A few days ago an or
der of the court was granted directing
him to pay $50 per month lor his wife's
support. He has told his friends that his
income is hardly that much. He now
threatens to kill Ws-wjfe and himself. He
is being closely watched.
Much importance is attached to the ar
rest at Belfast of a blood-stained man
with a razor and knives in his possession,
on suspicion of his being the Whitechapel
murderer. It was known beforehand
that the man who had been writing mys
terious letters to editors of newspapers
was actually in Belfast. On Oct. 9 he
wrote from London to the editor of a
Welsh newspaper. Two days afterwards
he wrote to a Belfast editor, the envelope
bearing the Belfast postmark, and was
directed evidently by the same person,
and the paper daubed over with red ink
to imitate blood exactly as in the speci
mens inspected. Since the evi
dence at the inquest yesterday about the
handwriting on the wall, the identity of
the murderer with the writer of these
letters is generally believed.
C.
tle
of
son
the
no
to
and
has
long
The only alarming feature of the
yellow fever scourge is the sudden ap
pearance of fever in South Jacksonville,
across the river. There are ten patients
at present there. A serious question
comes up for solution in the matter of
payment for private property destroyed
in process of general disinfection when
that shall begin. As understood at pres
ent, the government will not pay for
property destroyed where the owner is
able to stand the loss. Of course, no man
considers himself as belonging to that
class. A conference arranged with Dr.
Potter and Surgeon General Hamilton will
doubtless result in more definite instruct
ions from the government. Many people
will secrete household goods rather than
have them destroyed without promise of
reimbursement. Thousands are anxiously
awaiting the time for their return. Their
money is giving out, they must resume
business. Official bulletin : New cases
31; deaths 3. Total cases 8,586; total
deaths 311.
The indications are that this is to be the
last week of this session of congress, yet
no one has been authorized by the repre
sentatives of either party to make the
announcement. Much will depend upon
accidents. Itisnotyet clear that the
democrats as a body will agree that an
adjournment resolution shall be intro
duced in the house; yet, if one shall be
presented in the house, from whatever
quarter it may come, the impression is
that it will be adopted. There is no
question that if it shall be sent to the
senate that body will at once concur.
The fact is not forgotten by either pajty
that in three weeks from Tuesday next the
voting for presidential electors will begin;
and three weeks is a very short time for
those who desire to participate in the
campaign. There are a good many men
in both parties in both houses who have
remained here to the very last minute
of the time they can spare, and they in
tend, whatever may happen, to devote the
rest of the three weeks to the campaign.
There is no expectation that there will be
additions to the membership of either
house during the present week. The
quorum long since disappeared, and the
number of senators present in the chamber
on Friday was less than the clerical force
of the secretary's office
Depleting the Herds.
The spaying craze is still rampant
upon many parts of the range. Montana
and W yoming cattlemen have submitted
much of their she stock to the knife in
preparing for the change which so many
of them are convinced should be made,
wherein, steer stock is taking the place
and
the
the
and
to
is
an
of breeding stock. It is computed that
50,000 cows and heifers have been
spayed in Wyoming, Colorado, New
Mexico and Arizona this season. The
work goes on. In Texas the Conti
nental Cattle company is having a
large number of cows operated on, in
Arizona the Erie Cattle company will
have 3,000 head spayed, and other com
panies in that territory will use the
knife freely. With the many causes
that have been and are now in opera
tion besides the spaying tool to deplete
the herds throughout the range coun
try, the prophet who says that the day
is not far distant when a tremendous
reaction in cattle values will be seen, is
possessed of ordinary discernment sure
ly in his forecast.—New Mexico Stock
Grower.
Big Timber Letter.
Ed. Enterprise:—N ot even a ripple
from the immense political storm that
at present envelopes the territory has
as yet, reached the confines of Big Tim
her. Every day the citizens scan the
Independent awaiting its "revelations
which are to bring anguish to so many
of the republican party and cause the
defeat of T. II. Carter, Esq. Slowly
but surely the impression is gaining
ground that the Independent is crying
wolf," and you can safely pyt Big Tim
ber down for a large republican major
ity.
Mrs. Puett, who has resided for many
years resided on the Sweet Grass, near
Melville, is erecting a $2,500 residence
in this town. She has faith in the ulti
mate greatness of Big Timber and
shows her faith by her works.
Miss Eva Bush, daughter of Judge
C. C. Bush of Redding, California, ac
companied by her cousin, Henry Bush.
prominent attorney of Pittsfield, Illi
nois, are visiting with Mrs. Mirrielees
and the Hatch family—their relatives
and they express themselves as most
delightfully disappointed with the ap
pearance and resources of Montana.
George Hatch has 1,000 pounds of the
Boulder ore en route from the mines
for shipment for reduction.
W. W. Bensley is shipping sheep, cat
tle and horses, all of which he deals in
from this point. Last week ne shipped
eleven cars of stock and Mr. Harrison
shipped four care of sheep.
The Briggs & Ellis beef herd was
shipped from this point en Friday last*
The citizens here hope to obtain rec
ognition from the present management
of the Northern Pacilio reilroad. Al
though there was over 1,000,000 lbs. of
wool shipped from this point this sea
son and notwithstanding the fact that
the office here pays on an average of
$18,000 per month. Big Timber was
nothing to the old management other
than a spot on the map and obtained
no concessions to shippers or courtesy
to passengers. We have faith in the
good intentions of the present officers
and hope that they will think of us.
Matthew Moran's infant child has
been very sick and little hope is ex
pressed for its recovery.
To register a kick, I want to call at
tention to route agents that Big Timber
has stood their monkey business just as
long as it intends to and the next one,
after the promulgation of this general
order, who fails to awake when passing
this point and so neglects to throw off
the mail will be adjudged worthy of
death.
Apropros of the weather: "The mel
ancholy days have come," etc. X.
of
is
to
is
rie
the
no
a
felt,
The Right Triumph«.
The supreme court of ITtah has en
tered a final judgment and decree in the
case of the United fciates against the
Mormon church, to dissolve the church
corporation and have its property es
cheated to the government. The suit
was brought in the supreme court of
Utah under the act of congress of Feb
ruary 10,1887. In that suit a receiver
was appointed for the church corpora
tion. He has succeeded in collecting
over a million dollars' worth of prop
erty, real and personal. The decree en
tered is a complete triumph for the gov
ernment. It declares the corporation of
the church dissolved, and that the vol
untary religious sect now in existence
has no right to corporate property, ex
cept the Temple block and buildings,
which are set aside to it. It denies the
intervention of a large number of indi
viduals claiming the property, orders
the real estate of the corporation to be
held by the receiver until the informa
tions for forfeiture for the same to he
brought by the government can be
brought to a conclusion, and it declares
all personal property of the late corpo
ration to have become escheated to the
government. This point was the one
most bitterly fought, as the property of
the church was claimed on behalf of in
corporated Mormon people as succes
sors in interest to the late corporation,
and by individuals who were members
of the corporation. Under the evidence
the court decided that neither the pres
ent church nor individuals had any le
gal claims, that all the property had
been held upon trusts, the object of
which was principally to uphold polyg
amy, and that these trusts were the
only ones existing to which said prop
erty could he devoted. It further de
cided that the present church still up
holds, teaches ami maintains polygamy,
and any dedication of property to it
would be for the purpose of upholding
polygamy and would be unlawful.
Will you suffer with dyspepsia and
liver complaint? Shiloh's Vitalizcr is
guaranteed to cure you. Sold by M. A.
Peterson.
a
MONTANA NEWS.
Billings Gazette: A petition to the
governor, asking that a reward be offered
for the discovery of the murderer of Lewis
Sweet, signed by about 100 citizens of
Billings and Yellowstone county, includ
ing the board of county commissioners
and county officers, has been forwarded to
Governor Leslie, who has issued a procla
mation offering $1,000 for the apprehen
sion of the assassin.
Townsend Tranchant: The Park minci
managers are so well pleased with the re
sults ot their development work thus far I
that they have just closed fresh contracts
rnd\^k P «wlf^^ ad,1,,i0 ," a V 0n " el
and shaft work to the amount of some I
$5,000. The contractor moved up from
this point on Sunday a large load of sup- j
plies and implements, also some eight or
ten additional workmen. I
I
Philipsburg Mad: At Granite last I
I" e Ä. e If n " g ' f" 1 ' 5 '
A. M. was chartered, consecrated and its
officers installed. A number of visitors!
from Philipsburg were in attendance. At
the conclusion of the impressive ceremo
nies a grand banquet was served at the
Moore hotel, and toasts, speeches, etc.,
indulged in until a late hour. To use
the expression of one in attendance, it
was "simply grand and no mistake."
Yellowstone Journal: Ralph Bailey I
died yesterday a. m. from (lie effects of |
the accidental self inflicted gunshot
wound. Blood poison set m and no pos
Ä S3
such a termination and nothing was left
undone by them to ward off the fatal I
result. Bailey was about 28 years of age I
and had been working on the range for
several years and at the time of the ac
cident had made all arrangements to go
east with a train load of cattle and visit |
tho old folks; in fact was going that same
evening with the cattle train. He owned
plenty of money to pay the cost of his
medical attendance and all other debts |
incurred and there was some left.
Great Falls Leader: As heretofore
stated, the Northern Pacific railroad
made one Million dollars out of the travel
to and from the National Park last season,
The travel to the beautiful falls of the j
Missouri river and the Giant fountain*
would in a short time result in large re
turns. In addition to this the freighting
of coal, iron, silver and lead ore, besides
the vast amount of stock transportation,
is suffieent in itself to warrant the build
ing of a branch of the Northern Pacific
to this point. Let it come. The Leader
is reliably informed that next year will
see the Northern Pacific railroad con
structed to Great Falls and perhaps to
Fort Benton. The new life infused into
the Northern Pacific by Villard is begin
ning to show forth its good woiks.
Helena Record : The mass of demo
cratic adherents of the city must lose a
voter, and the German democratic club
must suffer tiie loss of one of its most val
uable exponents of the doctrine of free
trade. A sheriff of a Dakota town yes
terday appeared and laid harsh hands
upon the person of a young man named
Getzinger. and bore him away to the prai
rie country to answer a charge of embez
zling a former employer out of the snug!
sum of $150 in cool cash. Getzinger has
been a resident of the city for several 1
months and lias been until yesterday in
the employ of Jurgens & Price as a soda
water bottler. He worked steadily, and
no one suspected that lie was a crooked
man, or ever had been. During hi;
journ in the city he identified himself
actively in the democratic cause and was
prominent figure at the German club of
that denomination of politics. He made
speeches in the mother tongue and cheered
lustily for Grover. His loss will be much
felt, it is apprehended.
of
The Anaconda Review thus describes
the great smoke stack which is being
built to carry off the smoke from the town
and works: The big shaft at the lower
works proved to be a complete success,
and in view ot that fact the Anaconda
company incurs the immense expense in-1
volved in the construction of a second
stack, for the advantage of workmen and
the benefit of the town and outlying
country. On Tuesday the first stones for
the foundation of the massive chimney
were put in place. It is to stand on the
crest of the hill at the rear of the upper
works. Under the admirable plan of
construction first adopted at the lower
works the smoke will he conducted up
the steep incline to the base of the chirn
ney through a flue 1,400 feet long. This I
will be ten feet wide and of the same I
• • , , , . I
height from the bottom to the point where
the arch for the roof is sprung. Huge I
stones form the foundation of the chim
ney, the structure measuring 14 feet
across at its base. From the level of the
ground the shaft will be carried up 150
feet, so that its top will be clear of neigh
boring peaks and freely exposed to cur
îents that will cariy off smoke and fumes I
in unobstructed course. More than a
million brick will be required for the con
struction of this chimney, which will have
a diameter of 15 feet. As shown on the
plan in Engineer McFarlane's office, the |
Democratic Meeting. I
On Wednesday night an audience of |
about 300 democrats and republicans as
shaft looks
monument
like a second Washington
sembled in the Park Opera House to I
listen to democratic fallacies as outlined
and advanced by the speakers of the oc
casion. This occasion was the initial
night of the Park Opera House since the
stage settings wore put in place. The
house presents a very creditable appear
ance, and from the excellent stage a
speaker can be distinctly heard in every
part of the large hall. Among the ,.udi
euce was a fair sprinkling ot ladies, who,
by the way, seem to take as much inter
est in politics as their lords and masters,
The Livingston brass band, which had for
about a half hour been playing outside,
carne into the opera house about 8 o'clock!
of
I land and the republicans Benjamin Har
rison, and the similarity of the election
conlest *° lhc U " ttl > ! of Waterloo. He
I
predtcte;1 that the lm P erial S uard > s ° to
j speak, which was, as he claimed, free
whisky and legislation for corporations,
I .„„„ui t ;i ,i .»• t .,
I would fail the republican party on the
I sixth day of November, as did Napoleon's
imperial guard on that fatal field of
and the meeting w T as called to order by
Judge Savage, chairman of the demo
cratic central committee. On the plat
form were Judge Savage, Hon. Wm.
Field, Judge L. A. Luce, Hon. Robert
Smith and Attorney J. H. Elder.
Judge Savage said that the meeting
had been called to discuss tiie political
issues of the day. He then introduced
Attorney J. H. Elder, who spoke for
about ten minutes on the fact that the
democrats had nominated Grover Cleve
I
|
Waterloo. Mr. Elder's speech was not
one of argument, but of assertions such as
are made in democratic papers every day
of the year. He then delivered a pane
gyric on Wm. A. Clark, the democratic
nominee, making much capital out of the
fact that Mr. Clark came into the terri
tory as hundreds of our most worthy citi
zens had done in the early days of the
trail and the freight road. Mr. Elder
then gave the audience a chapter of an
" CMmection wi,h ,hc
the candidacy of Alleu G. Thurman,
I w hich the audience seemed to think very
I appropriate. The speech as a whole was
well received by the audience, and Mr.
Elder sat down amid a round of applause.
Hon. Wm. Field was then introduced
to the audience and was received with
great enthusiasm. Mr. Field told the
audience that he was no relative of De
mosthenes, but was a laboring man who
worked for his livelihood and was no
orator, but he would say a few words to
those who were Posent in regard to the
right of each citizen to cast a free and in
dependent ballot. He them made a shot t
speech saying that he wished to put him
self on record as not in favor of free trade,
but in favor of a reduction of the tariff.
He said that the republican party had
freed the slaves but had put 40,000,000
workingmen as slaves in their places. He
then said that the democratic party had
striven to reduce the tariff so that the
workingman could obtain his goods
cheaper. Mr. Field then attacked the
capitalists who, he said, were taking the
bread from the mouths of the workin ,ir -
O
men. Mr. Field then gave several rea
sons why he thought the Irish should vote
for Grover Cleveland. Stated that all
the legislators should not be lawyers;
that they should be drawn from the
ranks of all classes, delivered a high
encomium on the character of W. A. Clark
and paid a glowing tribute to the rail
road element in Livingston. He then
3 f i. u , »• , , „ . .
Sald tlwt " D hls return trom Geor -' 1 » ^
found that a paper published here had
come out and attacked him and a nomi
nee on the opposition ticket as creatures
of a corporation. He emphatically de
nied that the railroad had any influence
over him more than giving him employ
ment at the present time. Mr. Field
then took up the county ticket and
praised each one as highly as liis language
would allow. He then said a few words
in conclusion, asking for the support of
the voters of Park county, and sat down
amid a storm of applause.
Luce to the audience as the
| cratic war horse of
ures with great rapidity and with a pleas
- • , •. . . . . , ..
ing jocularity winch kept the audience in
. 1
a suil ^ e through his speech. The judge
is a well known speaker and his cavort
ings always amuse a crowd
T , , ,, , , .
was followed 1} y District Attorney
Poliert Smith, who was introduced by the
chairman, and who was received with ap
platise. Mr. Smith then started in by stating
L., -, ... . .
,ll " t ,lle re l >ul>lKan P art »' llvln S ,in 1,8
tpidlt ions and had becn wavln S the "ensan
guined garment" for the past twenty
years. "Unjust taxation is unnecessary
taxation" was the burden of Mr. Smith's
speech. The surplus came in for its
Share ° f abuSC ' Tlle Mills bil1 then oc
copied his attention and he rehearsed the
The band then played a selection, after
which Judge Savage introduced Judge
Old demo
Gallatin county."
Judge Luce made a few facetious
remarks which pleased the audience
mightily and put them in a good humor.
He bestowed a few friendly pats upon the
backs of the Livingston people as a peo
ple and as a town. He then started in on
the tariff and talked about forty-five min
utes, bringing up confusing arrays of fig
current democratic arguments in an at
tractive and taking manner which held
the close attention of the audience.
Mr. Smith brought his speech to a con
elusion several times but would suddenly
discover that there was one more point to
which he would like to call the attention
of the audience. He repeated this until
the audience showed unmistakable signs
of weariness. When lie finally sat down,
the audience quickly left the hall to re
turn to their virtuous couches and dream
of a tall and awkward figure indulging m
a series of De Witt Talmadge-like ges
turcs and uttering the statement that
"only God Almighty could beat Cleve
land and he was not running for office.'*

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