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The Livingston enterprise. [volume] (Livingston, Mont.) 1883-1914, November 17, 1888, Image 2

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jRiintjsto» CntîJ'priisr,
LIVINGSTON, - - MONTANA.
OFFICIAL l'AI'ER OF l'AKK COUNTY.
GEO.
Editor and Proprietor.
. WRIGHT, - -
J. I). Wiiem'i.ky, Associate Editor.
SATURDAY. NOVEMBER 17, 1888.
Entered at the poetoffioe in Livingston. M. T.
« second-class mail matter.
give THANKS.
President Shows the Many
This Country Has Cause
Keinem her.
Blessings
to
Wa-iiin
(.TON.
X(
>v. 1. Proclamation
by the
pi-i-f- ident
of tin
• ITi
ited States:
Constat:
it th:
i n k .
giving and
gratitude
are dm
from the
Alllel
•i<ai
i people to
Almighty
God for
liis goodm
l'SS (111
id m
erey, which
has follow
ed them
since the
day h
<* in
ade them a
nation and
vouch
Ha fed to tl
loin a
. fret
■ governnu
■nt. With
i loving
kindness
be In
IF < <
nif-tatitlv lei
rl uh in tin
> way of
prosperit\
• and
"IT
HtfieSrt. 11.
s has not
visited
w ith swift
puni
sdmi
eut ourtdioi
itcomings,
but with
gracious t
are In
* ha:
5 warned lie
of our dependence
on his forltearance, and 1ms taught us that obedi
ence to his holy law is the price of the continu
ance of iiis precious gifts. In acknowledgment
of all that < .«id has done for us as a nation, and to
the end that on an appointed day the praise of
grateful country may reach the throne of grace, I,
drover Cleveland, president of the United States,
hereby design and set apart Thursday, the 39th
day of November instant, as a day of thanksgiving
and prayer, to lie kept and observed throughout
the land on that day. I. et all our people suspend
their ordinary work and occupations, and in their
accustomed place of worship with prayer and
songs of praise render thanks to God for all his
mercies: for the abundant harvests which have re
warded husbandmen during the year that has
passed, and lor the rich rewards that have fol
lowed the labors of our people in their shops an
their marts of trade and (rallie. Let us give thanks
for the peace and for social order and content
ment within our borders, and for our advance
ment in all that adds to a nation's greatness. And
mindful of the afflictive dispensation with which
a portion of our land has been visited, w hile we
humble ourselves before the power of God, ac
knowledge his mercy in setting hounds to the
deadly march of pestilence: and h t our lieatts he
chastened by sympathy w ith our fellow country
men who hate suffered and who mourn. And as
we return thanks for all the blessings which we
have received from the bauds of our Heavenly
Father, let us not forget that he has enjoined
upon us charity, and on this day of Thanksgiving
let us generously remember the poor and needy
so that our tribute of praise and gratitude may be
acceptable in the sight of God.
Hone at the city of Washington, on the first day
of November, l yMU , and in the year of the Inde
pendence of the United States the 113th. In wit
ness thereof 1 have hereunto signed my name and
caused the seal of the United States to he affixed.
Gkoveu Cleveland,
By the President:
T. F. Bayard,
: eeretaryof State
Til A NKSGIVING PROCLAMATION.
Governor Leslie issues the following procla
mation, setting aside the 29th of November as a
day of Thanksgiving:
Territory of Montana, )
Executive Office, ;
Helena, Nov. 8, 1888. \
It has come to he a custom of this American
comm inwealth to call upon its people to suspend
their hurry and strife for one day in the closing
month of the year, and unite their hearts and
voices in praise and thanksgiving to Almighty
God, the ruler and keeper of this great nation,for
His lavish supplies of goodness, love and mercy
and llis gifts of peace and prosperity so bounti.
fully bestowed upon tiiese millions of His created
intelligences.
In pursuance of that custom the chief magis
trate of the United States has issued his procla
mation designating the 29th day of November,
1888, us the day for such holiness of thought, med
itation and thanksgiving, and inviting all the
people to engage heartily therein.
Therefore, 1, Preston 11. Leslie, governor of the
territory of Montana, do hereby invoke the atten
tion of this division of the great commonwealth
of America to that call of their chief ruler: and
do most earnestly urge them to engage at thei
private homes, and at their places of public wor
ship, in offering thanks and praise to Him who
the author and giver of the multitudes of bless
ings and great prosplrity w hich have so plonti
fully liuliled up their travels of another year.
In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my
hand and caused the great seal of the territory of
Montana to he attached. Hone at Helena, the
capital of said territorial government, this eighth
d*y of November, eighteen hundred and eighty
eight, and of the Independence of the United
States of America, the one hundred and thirteenth
year. Preston H. Leslie.
f Seal. j By the Governor,
Wm. 15. Wki'.i:, Sec y of Montana Ty.
THE RESULTS.
Tht' exi-itcineut attendant upon the
election Is now over and the voter can
now calmly and clearly review the po
litical situation. From the head of the
nation to the county ticket the republi
cans have been triumphant. A com
plete revolution has apparently occurred
from the Atlantic to the Pacific, with
out strife or dissension, but simply by
means of a quiet and orderly ballot. No
system of fraud, no combination of one
interest is large or powerful enough to
have accomplished any such end. How
ever prejudiced the voter maybe, the
conclusion is inevitable that the voice
of the people has been raised in protest
against free trade as advocated by the
present administration. If the millen
ium was at hand and every laborer, ev
ery civilized man on the globe, rested
under equal mental, physical and geo
graphical conditions, then tree trade
would be right and proper, The people
of the United States have said, however
that this time was not yet and that the
people of this great and free country
should be protected by the government
from the inroads of pauper labor and
pauper made goods. A revision of the
tariff is needed and demanded. This
demand will be complied with in such
a way that none of our great industries
will be crippled, as they would have
been had the policy of free wool, lead,
salt, lumber and other staple products
prevailed.
From the returns at present it ap
pears that both houses of congress will
be in sympathy with the administra
tion. Irrespective of the good news
that a republican majority will prevail,
this is well, as congress will be more in
accord with the spirit of the adminis
tration.
Closely following these great victories
and of nearly as vital importance to the
citizens of Montana is the complete
turn-over in territorial polities. The
statement has many times been made
by those who are well posted on terri
torial affairs that Montana was a re
publican territory, notw ithstanding the
large democratic majority of two years
ago. The recent election proves this to
he a fact*, as will as the fact that it is
: by a large majority. Montana is
I therefore also in accord with theadmin
j istration. This means strenuous and
! probably successful efforts for the ad
j mission of at least four new republican
states, and Montana will at the next
presidential election vote for electors to
help decide the national contest.
T.
the
dm
for
of
to
a
I,
his
re
he
as
COMMENTS.
The set of county officers who have
been elected to serve the taxpayers of
Park county the next two years are
eminently satisfactory to all good citi
zens. While good men were defeated
it is true, good men have also been
elected and the affairs of the county
will be in good hands.
* *
Af
It is to be hoped that the question of
a court house will soon be agitated.
The county is in a prosperous condition
and its business has reached such pro
portions that more extensive accommo
dations are a necessity. The county of
ficers need offices, the board of commis
sioners need rooms, and above all is the
great need of accommodations for the
district court. This is shown very
plainly during the present term. The
opera house is rented for the court at a
considerable expense, and the accommo
dations for jury work are very inade
quate. A rent paid for county offices
is equal to the going rate of interest on
•$15,000. A sum which would erect a
handsome and commodious court house
furnishing accommodations for any con
tingency that might arise and in much
better shape than at present. The peo
ple of Park county have decided by
tremendous majority that Livingston is
the proper place for the permanent lo
cation for the county seat and steps
should be taken immediately to provide
the necessary accommodations for the
constantly increasing county business
* .. *
The grand jury report published in
another column is brief and brings for
ward no new questions except that of
the care of the county poor. Fortu
nately for Montana, this question is
one of minor importance inasmuch as
the percentage of pauperism is lower
than in any other state or territory in
the United States of equal population
There is all the more reason, however,
for thoroughness and care in keeping
those unfortunates that the county does
have in charge and the county commis
sioners should investigate these matters
thoroughly and decide upon the best
system of providing for the care of the
poor, consistent with the best interests
of the tax-paying public.
# *
On Tuesday, November 20, the prop
erty owners of Livingston will vote on
the question of incorporation. We have
before stated our views on this subject
and it is left for the voters to say what
they want at the polls. The pros rather
outweigh the cons on this question and
we think that the community and busi
ness interests of the town would be
greatly benefited thereby. The three
great needs of our embryo city are wa
ter-works, sidewalks and sanitary regu
lations. The recent election has shown
that the town has a population of over
2,000 and there is no town of that size
in the territory that does not enjoy the
benefits of incorporation. The results
of a conilagration in Livingston would
be very serious at present, whereas, if
a complete system of waterworks were
established much of the danger would
be averted and insurance rates conse
quently lowered. It is now for the tax
payers to say as to whether they think
the slightly increased taxation would
be warranted by the increased benefits.
We think they would.
It is with deep regret we chronicle
the death of Dr. Alfred Parsons, the as
sistant territorial veterinary surgeon of
Montana. He was one of the best edu
cated men in his profession in the coun
try. A graduate of Cornell university,
on completion of his course in that fa
mous institution he spent several years
in Europe studying in the best schools
of that branch of science on the conti
nent. He was a young man and had
not long been in Montana, but had al
ready given promise of becoming one
of the authorities on equine diseases
He made friends of everybody he met,
though few intimates. Only those who
were fortunate enough to be included
among the latter knew the depth of his
mind and the serious thought he had
given to the great questions of the day
outside of his profession. He died in
Helena on Saturday night, of that dread
complaint, pneumonia, which has laid
low in a few hours several of our bright
est and apparently strongest young
men. His remains were sent east on
Tuesday to his family in Xew York.
His father is a very well known art
critic and is superintendent of the art
department of Harper Bros.' publica
tions. This gentleman has the heart
felt sympathy of the many friends of
his lamented son. The world can ill
afford to lose such men of promise as
Dr. Parsons. He was cut off in the
prime of life with his work just begun.
* ^ *
By a perusal of the court proceedings
it will appear that the grand jury re
turned a number of indictments in
cases which on coming to trial a nolle
prosequi was entered by the county at
torney. Grand juries before returning
indictments should make every reason
able effort to determine that the evi
dence is sufficient to warrant a trial.
Otherwise the county is put to a lot of
unnecessary expense. It would also be
well for the county attorney to exercise
care in writing his indictments, as the
guilty are liable to go free and all the
expense of bringing the case to trial is
for naught if the indictment is thrown
out on legal techicalities.
6
Use printed stationery and leave your
orders for the same at this office.
By^
wide
for
Press Comments.
Benton River Press (dem.): In an
swer to the inquiry, "Who is Tom Car
ter?" we will say he is a gentleman
who, by the grace of two Montana dem
ocrats, will represent this territory at
Washington for two years, commencing
March 4,1889.
Dillon Tribune (dem.): It is really
surprising that the number of republi
can recruits in Montana has increased
so rapidly in two short, fleeting years.
Many democrats must have been born
again, politically and paragorically, in
that short space of time.
Helena Herald (rep.): The tips that
deceived Montana democrats who wa
gered their coin on Clark were the as
surances of the bosses that a sum never
before equaled had been distributed to
influence the election. But manhood
outweighed money. The voter could
not be corrupted.
Butte Mining Journal (dem.): The
defeat of Hon. W. A. Clark, while
benefit to himself, is a calamity to the
community. The bar'l was on the re
publican side in Montana, and the de
feated candidate can look his fellow cit
izens in the face and truthfully say that
neither he nor his friends attempted to
bribe or intimidate a single voter. His
opponents cannot say as much.
Yellowstone Journal: The republi
can triumph in Montana is regarded
with particular satisfaction by the lead
ing republican papers of the states: It
was not believed to be possible that our
territory could he wheeled into the re
publican column, and the fact that we
have done it makes Montana a notable
feature in the summing up of the re
sults.
Butte Inter Mountain (rep.): It was
issues and issues only that elected Tom
Carter to congress. The republican
orators and newspapers could not pos
sibly entertain any personal ill will to
wards the democratic candidate. Cleve
land and his free trade message beat
Mr. Clark. Had the platforms of the
two parties been reversed, Carter would
have been defeated by 5,000 votes.
Great Falls Leader (rep.): Beyond
all controversy the congressional cam
paign just terminated was the most ex
citing in the history of Montana. The
contest, so valiantly prosecuted on both
sides, has resulted in a signal triumph
for Hon. Thomas H. Carter, the valiant
leader of the republican hosts. He has
won a pronounced victory over the
prestige of age and wealth and is to be
congratulated by the whole people.
Bozeman Courier: If the recent cam
paign was not a clean one for W. A.
Clark we should like to know how he
views the election result. It was a
clean sweep—from basement to garret
—of the old Montana delegate faction
that has dictated to and domineered
over the citizens of the territory and
their policital rights and best interests
for nearly a quarter of a century. Good
bye, bull-dozers, good bye. Good bye,
big boodlers, good bye.
Xew Northwest: There was good
and effective work done by the republi
can press of Montana in the recent cam
paign. The Record, Inter-Mountain,
Herald, Item and Leader were potent
factors in the campaign, and the weekly
Avant Courier, Enterprise, Yellow
stone Journal and Sun, each did good
service. It is fair to say the republicans
had the best of the argument, and it is
just as fair to say the Montana republi
can press didn't overlook many points
Butte Miner (dem.): The whole gist
of the speakers' remarks at the meeting
at Miners' Union hall last evening was
their apparent surprise at the result of
the recent election in Montana. We
have but to point for the solution of
the apparent mystery, thoroughly un
derstood by the gentlemen who spoke
at last night's meeting, to the action of
certain corporate concerns in Missoula,
Lewis and Clarke and Jefferson conn
ties, the solid Northern Pacific railroad
vote, and to the unprecedented methods
adopted by certain parties in this coun
ty, all of whom, we are forced to admit
have in the past been identified with
the democratic party in this territory.
PARK OPERA HORSE
2 PERFORMANCES ONLY
TUESDAY AND WEDNESDAY,
Nov. 20 &
21 ,
Appearance of Montana's recognized favorite
CHAS. C. MAUBURY
AND
NELLIE BOYD
Appearing in Tyrrell & Clarke's great scenic play
"His Natural Life."
New and elegant Scenery. Wonderful Mechanic
devices. The strongest and most humane play
ever written.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 21, JOHN A. STEVENS'
MASTERPIECE:
PASSION'S SLAVE.
Elegant scenery for both Plays.
Seats now on sale at Peterson's drug store.
50 Cents.
THE
WEEKLY PIONEER PRESS
Will be sent to any Address
MONTHS FOR 50 CEINTS
The Celebrated Picture
"THE HORSE FAIR "
Rosa Bonhenr, 34 inches long by 20 inch««
" ' 50 cents
!y Pioneer
wide sent free to every person sending 50 centB
6 months subscription to the weekh
Press. Address the Pioneer Press Co., St. Paul.
at
in
to
to
It
H. L. LOWNDES,
DEALER IN
BEEF CATTLE, WOOL HIDES, FOBS, ETC
COMMISSION MERCHANT.
PROPRIETOR OF
The Livingston Meat Market,
West Side Main Street.
K
LU
00
D
J
LUMBER! LUMBER!
I again announce to my many patrons that I am
still iu the field, and better prepared than ever before,
to furnish any and everything in my line. With in
creased mill facilities I am enabled to fill all orders
promptly and of the best Material known to tiiis^ coun
try. I make a specialty of filling orders for bill stuff
from my mills. I have a complete planing mill to do
all kinds of dressing. My assortment of Eastern and
native lumber cannot be surpassed in Montana, which
consiste in part, of finishing, flooring, siding, ceiling,
etc. Also sash, doors, blinds, moulding, latn, pickets,
shingles, plastering hair, plaster paris, cement, etc.
I also handle Heath »Si Milligan paints, the best known
to the trade and fully in teed. I have associated
with me some of the best carpenters in the land, and
will give estimates on, and put up any kind buildings no
matter how large or how small, and guarantee entire
satisfaction to all, and at prices that cannot be beat in
Montana. Thanking the public for their very liberal
patronage in the past, I ask a continuance of l he same
E. GOUGHNOUR.
r
c
id
m
a
I H
w.
F. SHEAR ID,
Wholesale and Retail Dealer in
ml
J **M***X.W
AND ALL KINDS OF SPORTING GOODS.
The Largest and Finest stock of Gnus Fishing Tackle, Hunters' and Trappers
Outfits in tiie West. Prices quoted on application.
Exporter and Dealer in Raw Furs and Hides,
Game Heads, .Specimens and Live Game Animals bought. All Kinds of Taxi
dermy Work done to order.
JL
Breech Loading Shot Guns, double barrel.............................................00 to $100 00
Muzzle Loading Shot Guns, double barrel............................................. 5 00 to la 00
Winchester Rifles. 1880 mode), 45-90, 45-70, 40-82, 40 05, .'18 50 cal....................... 15 00 to 21 00
Winchester Rifles, 1870 and 1873 models, anv cal...................................... 12 50 to 19 (10
Colt's Lightning Rifle, 45-85, 45-70, 40-00, 44,' 38, 32, 22 cal............................. 15 00 to 24 00
Late Model Marlin Rifles, 45-85, 45-70, 40-00, 38-55, 32-40 cal............................ 18 00 to 26 05
Old Model of above cal................................................................ 15 00 to 18 00
All kinds of Single Shot Rifles at cut prices. All rifles are resighted and guaranteed to shoot
correctly. All my rifles are made to my order and any rifle coming from me bears my name and ad
dress and is fully warranted in every respect.
Chamberlain & Peters» Loaded Shot Shells on hand in any quantities, or loaded to order by
machine, with any kind of powder made, from $2.50 to $4.25 per hundred, any size shells.
All kinds of Gan Repairing done in first-class shape. Satisfaction guaranteed.
Montana Agent for
itana Agent
FREUND'S
Hunting Sights.
Prices Quoted on
Heads, Hides and
Furs at any time.
Reference: National Park Bank.
Correspondence Solicited.
Park St., Livingston, M. T.
E J.
HARNESS,
Manufacturer of and Dealer in
OWENHOUSE,
SADDLES,
WHIPS,
Ghapajoros,
Etc., Etc.
Bridles,
Bits,
and Spurs
Repairing Promptly Attended to at Reasonable Prices
Corner Main and Calendar Streets, LIVINGSTON M. T
Reduction in Prices!
TO THE TRADE.
I am now prepared to till orders direct from
tucky, consisting of the following known brands :
Bonded Warehouses in Ken
Waterville A Fraser,
W. H. McBrayer,
Adams Distilling Co.,
W. S. Stone
All Spring '81 Whiskey, which 1 will sell at prices that will astonish even the
Missourians. I have connected myself with Eastern houses, and am thereby en
abled to sell goods at Eastern Prices. I also carry fine California Wines and
Brandies Cigars ranging from $30 to $100 per M. All orders bv mail promptly
filled. *
O. A. BÜRO,
Wholesale and Retail Liquor Dealer, Main Street, Livingston, M. T
STULL & FOWLIE,
DEALERS IN
WHISKIES.
Park Street, Livingston.
M.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
Dealer in
ROTH,
TAIL
Tine Liquors,
KEY WEST AND DOMESTIC CIGARS
An Assorted Stock of Fine Bottled Goods
Jnst Received for ths Holiday Trade.
SOLE AGENT FOR FALK'S MILWAUKEE BEER
NEXT DOOR TO COURT HOUSE, *****
Park Street,
Livingston, Montana.
E
Thompson bros;;
Fall Announcement!
All the Novelties in
WIN T ER DRESS GOODS,
Flannels. Tricots, Broadcloths, Flannel Suits
n gs, Et,
An Elegant line of
Plushes, Velvets, Silks and Satins,
Dress Trimmings, Braided Setts, Silk Braids, ornament
Etc., Etc.
ZEPHYR, STAPLE AND FANCY YARNS
in great variety. An immense 6tock of
KNIT UNDERWEAR
at prices that defy competition. We still have the agency of
Springer Bros. Cloaks and Wraps
and can sell you in this line a more stylish and better garment than tou can
get elsewhere for the same money
Domestics, Table Linen, Crashes, Notions, Bed Quilt s
and a very large stock of
OREGON AND CALIFORNIA BLANKETS.
Boots and Shoes !
with ns is a specialsy.
Gents' Ladies' Misses' and Childrens',
in any style, size and width desired. A full stock of
LILLY, BRACKETT & CO.S'
Mens' line shoes. Remember ! to get good boot» or shoes
GO TO THOMPSON'S.
We have this season an vnnsnally large stock of
CLOTHING,
all of which was selected with great care and that we know will give satisfaction
Fur-Trimmed
Chinchilla Coats
Overcoats
Corner Main and Callendar streets,
"▼nrosTo* MOR****
and Ve8ts,
Cuffs.
Beaver Collars «and
Best line ever shown in town of
Hats and Caps.
In this line in addition to our elegant and complete stock we have
GENTS' AND LADIES' ALASKA SEAL CAPS
At prices much below Chicago catalogne prices.
GLOVES AND MITTENS FOR ALL
The largest and finest stock of
Furnishing Goods
over shown in this city. It is said that Harrison and Cleveland wear the
tt
Gold and Silver" Shirts.
Me have the agency tor these celebrated shirts. A foil stock can be found inaUefre*.
arrived a foil stock of those
Jo»'
Felt Shoes and Slippers.
Come early to get the size and width yon want. We have the agency In Park county to' •*'
— _
BTJTTERICK PATTERNS,
All ladiee are reqnested to send in their names or call for the fashion sheet*.
promptly attended to.
If til ont * 1
GROCERIES !
At Wholesale and Retail!
E ' PKi * 1 «.d ect (.faction O. Uw
.It*** 4
. We are always in the field for sqnsre compsd* 10 *'
Cfifi give customers advantage of onr large stock
aad oar ahfifi^ to hay la large quanti
tie* at lowest possible prices.

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