OCR Interpretation


The Livingston enterprise. [volume] (Livingston, Mont.) 1883-1914, January 19, 1889, Image 2

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075261/1889-01-19/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

±inn
on
1.1 \ ING'TON,
IL'nti'vpuoc,
- MONTANA.
Ol
' MCI
i al r\i
■i;k oi
- I'.Y III
lv COUNTY.
GEO. H, 1
«RIGHT.
- . -
Editor
and Proprietor.
J.
1). YViiei.
PLEY, A:
voulut* 4
Editor.
SAT
UK DAY
. JAM
"AH Y
19, 1889.
• V T
<1 at th- ;
fstoffif"
in Livi
ingston, M. T.
The
pulpit
a^itatii
m ahe
>ut the in
at
i<run
il 1 all w
ill prm
re uric
n ailing ex
Cf
■i't to
i bring
into r
Micule
and con
te
Dipt
tin- relijrioiis
crank
s who arc
in
akin,
j them-'
elves n
otorioi
is by their
ill
1 tim'
"ff an«l u
for ir
iterference.
"file
m 'innere
pu -lit ,,
i the winter ear
iff
val i
u -t. Ta
;,1 has :
postpoi
aetl the col
irath
m until
the wi
inter o
f 1890. It
M>i n<
it a mat
t,. r of
choice
but of ne
<M
■-si tv
. as the 1
cold ha
- not 1
een contin
u<
'US c
nought
L) furiff:
sh ire
for the pal
at
•e or
snow foi
„h.j.rri
ing.
ii. i;
. Ilarrist
Hi. sine*
e his r
et urn from
th
i* i*.is
t. has he
!<>n asc
mserv;
ative in his
st.
atom
nuts r<'_r
anling
the im
•-ming ad
m
irffsti
ratioa a
s his fa
ther h
as been re
, r .
irffin;
j the 1c
irmatiu
'll ol 1
iis cabinet,
.ff it :
ho know
s anvil
iiii c r ah
out the ap
J)1
-int n:
ii-llt.- to
lie ma:
ir aft el
r the 4th of
M
j -
lie has ;
:i"t let
drop ai
ny hints to
that effect.
\V
icral Warren, I. I). McU'utcheon,
.Sanders, L. H. llershiield. Tom
White and James II. Mills
rower,
are talked of a
(•material elia
is t
that i
politi
he mi
M .C
Lot
andidates for the gub
We think, however
be as a reward for
•s the api>ointment would
gly made to (,'olonei J. I>.
•r Wilbur 1". Sanders.
its are becoming a
nl late. When there
in the way of
sort of
are difli
lisposing
lashioii
cuities
of a piece of property at private sale
it is immediately proposed to raftie
it off. The gambling spirit is very
strong in the western people and they
arc always ready to "buck" iong odds
if they stand any chance of getting
something for nothing.
The eh
••■tion
oi
f I)r. Cole as
president
of the ro
uneii ;
:;n
d Lee Mantle
• as speak
er of tli
e hoti:
;c
were good
moves, as
they are
both
Ci
apable men.
We note
that cast'
era A
to:
atana is reprt
•sented in
the housi
,a!
- by II. D, Arkwright,
who was
eleett
•d
enrolling am
1 engross
ing clerk
. Tin
in
ks. gentleinei
i! "Small
favors t
liankf
iff
!y received, k
irger ones
in propoi
'tion,"
V,
hen w e get them.
Mr. No
liert La
w, formerly
superin
tendent <
if this
S>
rand division.
, has been
tendered
and h
as
excepted the
manage
meut oi t
he M<
m
tuna Union r
>ad in the
place ofi
w.
i)
ickinson who
i has re
signed. .
Accor
di:
ng to the
published
statement in the territorial papers,
the Montana Union has Leen in very
bad shape for some time and has been
run in a haphazard sort of fashion, and
there will lie plenty of opportunity for
the exercise of Mr. Law's ability in
rai 1 road managein eu t.
The following hand bill is being dis
tributed in Leicestershire: "English
men—Head! During the fifty years of
Victoria's reign 1.225,UOO Irishmen have
died of famine! 3,008,000 Iiidmien
have been evicted! 4,1S6,000 Irishmen
have emigrated, been obliged to leave
Ireland! Tins means 400 per week died
of famine. 1,40. » per week evicted. 1.000
per week emigrated! Men of Leicester
shire. do you realize that 1,220,0* 11 souls
is a number equal to ten times the pres
ent population of your county town—
Lei« m r- the. Can vou wonder Ire
lam,
for i
wrongs erv aloud to vou
dr
ana legislature is
.t will be seen by a
graphies presented
this week that tin
now
pen
in
isal
in the
• are a
session, an
of their i
supplomeii
representative body of men. Most of
them are men who have been many
years in the territory and are well ac
quainted with the needs and resources
of the country in which they live.
They are men who have been selected
to serve the people, not for their wealth
or polit ieal inlluence, but because the
voters felt that their interests were safe
in their hands Montana can well lie
proud ot lier legislators of the Sixteenth
session. , _
It is rumored that it. B. Harrison has
on hand a scheme to purchase two pa
pers in Helena, presumably the Herald
and the Record, and to consolidate them
into one mammoth morning daily. An
article in one ot the New York papers
says that lie raised SI1)0,000 in New,
York city for that purpose. Mr. Har
ris« in has always claimed to own the
associated press franchise for Helena,
and the purchase of these two well
known papers would give the new en
terprise a fine send off from the begin
ning. The Independent while under
the editorial management of J. 5 >. Dick
erson deiied any one to disturb its fran
chise. There will probably be consider
able trouble before such a scheme ma
terializes, if it is attempted, as rumored
it will be;
The reclamation of the arid lands, ac
cording to Major Powell's ideas, seems
liable to become an established fact
within a l'ew years. It is said that the
preliminary surveys, in conjunction
with the enormous amount of work al
ready done by the geological depart
ment could be completed in live or six
years at a cost of $5,220,000. The dis
posion of congress seems to be to make
liberal appropriations for the purpose
above stated. The government has al
ready been appealed to undertake the
construction of storage reservoirs, at
the head waters of theJNorth and South
Platt and Arkansas rivers for the be
T.
It
of
to
I>.
of
as
in
in
of
a
nelit of the people of Colorado, Nevada, !
Kansas and Arkansas. The plans as;
projected by Major Powell, include as |
well the drainage of the upper Missouri,
for the benefit of Montana ranchers. 1 be
i. ___________""
The news contained in another col- 0
umn that the Anaconda Smelting com
pany is about to build a railroad of its
own to Butte is good news in many j
ways. It is not only an assurance that j C
the works will be supplied with ore
without any interruption, but is pretty j t
rood evidence that the company intends i
to keep them in operation for some time
to come, or else they would not go to
the enormous expense of building this
road. It is said that some arrangement
has been made with the French copper
syndicate for their absorption of all the
products of the Anaconda company for
a stated number of years.
The commissioner of Indian affairs
has submitted his report to the secre
tary of the interior. He recommends
some changes to be made in the manner
of purchasing supplies and in the con
ducting of Indian schools. lie also
recommends the extension of civil ser
vice rules to Indian service. His report
concludes by saying: "The Indian has
indeed begun to change with the chang
ing times. He is commencing to appre
ciate the fact that he must become civ
ilized or perish from the face of the
earth. The Indian must be taught how
to labor; and that labor may be made
necessary to his well being, he must be
taken out of the reservation through
the door of the general allotment «et.
And he must be imbued with the exalt
ing egotism of American civilization so
that lie will say T instead of 'We,' and
'This is mine' instead of 'This is ours.'
But k iie w ill not learn; if he shall con
tinue to persist in saying, *1 am content;
let me alone,'then the guardian must
act for the ward, and must do for him
the good services he protests shall not
be done—the good service that he de
nounces as a bad service. The govern
ment must then, in duty to the public,
compel the Indian to come out of his
isolation into the civilized way that he
does not desire to enter.
to
The gove rnor's message* while long
and covering much ground, deals in
many instances in generalizations
which do not afford much information
to any inquiring mind. On the whole,
however, it is a fairly creditable docu
ment. We suppose that it will be in
the millenium alone that government
officials will learn to clear away the
vast amount of verbiage and long, high
sounding but meaningless sentences
that encumber their reports and mes
sages. There are many examples of
tiffs fault in Governor Leslie's latest
effort. The anxious parent as he reads
the chapter on education will pause in
wonder as lie reads the opening sen
tence, which is as follows: "All men
are born into this world calling for
three great wants,to-wit: culture,
know ledge and something to explain to
them all they see around them, and
also thee, ow n nature, condition and
destiny." After some little thought he
will probably be able to grasp the idea
that the governor intended to convey
The advocate of purity of the ballot
will not deny the truth of the following
and although the wording is somewhat
mixed the sentiment will be acquisced
in by every good citizen. "Every at
tempt to inject into the election count
illegal votes, or to clothe a legal vote
with the garment of bribery or other
criminal tinge is a stab and a wound in
the direction of death to free govern
ment." The governor has also allowed
his chapter on education to slightly run
into that on insanity as he says: Every
child is the ward of the territory, and
its treasury is open to its educational
necessities—to the raving maniac as
to the vacant minded idiot. Joking
aside, while we have the utmost respect
for our worthy governor and he has
the excuse of precedent set for him
by almost every governor in the
Union, we look hopefully forward to
the time, w*hen it will not be con
sidered necessary for the executive to
add to the load of an already over
turdened people, who conscientiously
endeavor to seek for the grain of wheat
in the great amount of chaff annually
thrown upon them in the shape of mes
sage«, reports, etc.
A New System.
The Pioneer Press has the following
discription of the new method of tran
We present to our readers tiffs week
a supplement containing the governor's
message in full and short biographies
of the members of the Sixteenth Legis
lature. It will be seen by these biogra
phies that the men who compose tiffs
legislature are representative citizens of
Montana, most of them having been
identified with the history of the terri
tory for many years past. The gover
nor's message, as will be seen at a
glance, is extremely lengthy and coven
a wide range of subjects. The report
on the financial condition of the terri
tory is interesting reading to every res
ident or intending resident of the terri
tory. He quotes Governor Potts'mes
sage, iff which he urged a more common
observance of .Sunday as a day free
from labor, and he more especially
urges that the gambling houses should
be closed on this day. He recommends
improvements in the care of the insane
and the establishment of a house of re
form, the creation of a territorial board
of agriculture and a stricter enforce
ment of the game laws. He recom
mends the passage of a bounty law for
the killing of wolves, coyotes and moun
tain lions, but neglects to say anything
pro or con in regard to a law affecting
the festive gopher. He very justly de
mands that the attorney general be paid
for past services and recommends the
codification of the Montana stat utes.
of
al
it
than
In
WaU
F
«acting business on the Northern Paci-|
The statements are said to be offi- j
resignation of Assistant
Buckley, of the
!
rial. "The
| General Manager
Northern Pacific, will in all probability ;
1 be followed by important changes all
along the line; changes, however, more
0 f title than anything else. Itisunder
gtoocl that t h e unusual and rather
aw ^ warc | arrangement of officering the
j line wm be transformed into a more
j C oininon and more systematic state of
things. Heretofore there have been
j t h ree distant general managers (the
i ^jj-q ijpin iT created last vearjwith equal i
, , . , .
rank, each having charge ot a grant. ;
division of the road and each reporting
to the general manager. Mr. Buckley 's
retirement affords an opportunity to
change all this, and the office of assist
ant general manager will be abolished.
Mr. Ainslie, who has had charge of the
eastern grand division, will be made
general superintendent and his juris
diction extended over the whole line,
Mr. Root, now assistant general man
ager of the middle division with head
quarters at Helena, will be given the
title of assistant general superintendent
although his duties will not differ ma
terially from what they are now. The
office of assistant general superintend
ent of the Pacific division will probably
be left vacant for the present. Vice
President Prescott, of Tacoma, looking
after that end. The plan simply abol
ishes the office of assistant general
manager, and cieates that of general
superintendent and two assistants,
titles that more nearly represent the
duties performed. The change will
give Mr. Ainslie entire charge of road
and taansportation. It is understood
that these changes will go into effect
about Jan. 20, although nothing has
been officially announced, and even Mr.
Ainslie's new title has not definitely
been determined. The change has long
been thought desireable by nearly all
the officers of the operating department,
and will promote uniformity and har
ony all al ong the line.''
A GREAT MAGAZINE.
^v,...
The Century for 1889.
HE question has often been
asked, "to what does The
Century owe its great circu
lation T' The Christian Union
once answered this by the
statement that "it has been
fairly won, not by adver
tising schemes, but by the excellence which
characterizes it in every department" In
their announcements for the coming year
the publishers state that it has always been
their desire to make The Century the one in
dispensable periodical of its class, so that
whatever other publication might be desira
ble in the family, The Century could not be
neglected by those who wish to keep abreast
of the times in all matters pertaining to
culture. And the unprecedented circula
tion of the magazine would seem to be the
response of the public to this intention.
With the November number The Century
begins its thirty-seventh
volume. Two great feat
ures of the magazine
which are to continue
throughout the new vol
ume are already well
known to the public, the
Lincoln history and the
papers on "Siberia and
the Exile System." The
first of these, written by
Messrs. Nicolay and Hay,
President Lincoln's pri
vate secretaries, contains
the inside history of the
dark days of the war, as
seen irom the White
House.
THE SIBERIAN PAPERS,
by George Kennan. are attracting the at
tention of the civilized world. The Chi
cago Tribune says that "no other magazine
articles printed in the English language just
now touch upon a subject which so vitally
interests all thoughtful people in Europe and
America and Asia." As is already known,
copies of The Century entering Russia have
these articles torn out by the customs officials
on the frontier.
DURING 1SS9
The Century will publish the most im
portant art feature that has yet found
place in its pages. It is the
result of four years' work
of Mr. Timothy Cole, the
leading magazine engrave!
of the world, in the galleries
of Europe, engraving from
the originals the greatest
pictures by the old masters.
A series of papers on Ire
land, its customs, land
scapes, etc., will appear, and there are to
be illustrated articles on Bible scenes,
treating especially the subjects of the Inter
national Sunday-School Lessons. George
W. Cable will write " Strange, True Stories
of Louisiana." There wiil be novelettes
and short stories by leading writers, occa
sional articles on war subjects (supplement
al to the famous "War Papers" by General
Grant and others, which have been appear
ing in T7ie Century), etc., etc.
The Century costs four dollars a year, and
it is published by The Century Co., of New
York, who will send a copy of the full pros
oectus to any one on request.
A
Ol
-MV
rotai
¥ £ ROYAL MSÜ48J ^
HslhI»Ik WutMA
Win*
POWDER
Absolutely Pure.
This powder never varies. A marvel of purity,
strength and wholesomeness. More economical
than the ordinary kinds, and cannot be sold in
competition with the multitude of low test, short
weight, alum or phosphate powders. Sola only
In cans. ROYAL BAKING POWDER CO., 106
WaU St., N. Y. "
of
of
to
the
the
for
on
kee
of
V>
"
"
F OR RENT.—Dwelling house on lower Main
street, two stories, frame, withgood well and
nwiriLrtr'f offl£c. qulre ofF W - «right, county
Mo.
j (Jiw. wanted.-a girl from 11 to is year?
; Park cotm ty, m. t.: I will hold a public
examination at.my Saturday of
age wanted to do Tight honee work. Good
pay and good home, with steady situation. Ap
ply at County Clerk's office.
NOTICE TO TEACHERS.—To the teachers of
Januarv, February and March. 1889.
EVA M. HUNTER.
Co. Snp't of Schools.
1 AOU SALE.—A number of milch cows; or will
; trade fresh cows for dry cows. Also a fow
grade and short horn bulls and some stock cattle
for sale. Apply at Spring Hill ranch, one mile
east of town, or address J. II. HARVAT,
J5,tf Livingston.
T\TOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN That th
l!l be a special meeting ol the Board of Coin
i on Monday, January 2Sth, a.
the votes cast at the Livingstoi
; ti,>n, and for the transaction »
N
proo
\TOTICE OF FORFEITURE.—Livingston, M
i.1 T., January 14th, 1889. To Thomas Watson,
I). G. Hollnian and L. A Luce: You are hereby
notified that I have expended $300 in labor and
improvements upon the Nashville, Mammoth
and Gertie quartz lodge mining claims, situated
in the New World miuing district. Park county,
Montana territory, as win appear by reference to
certiiicates filed in the office of the recorder of
said county, in order to hold said premises under
the provisions cf section 2324 of the Revised
statutes of the United States, being the amount
required to hold the Nashville for the years 1886,
ins : aE ,(i 1888, and the Mammoth and Gertie
claims for the year.ending December 31, 1888,
And if within ninety days after the pub
lication of this notice you fail or refuse to con
tribute your proportions of such expenditure as
co-owners, viz: Thomas Watson one-third in
terest in the Nashville; D. G. Hollman one
sixth interest in the Mammoth, and L. A. Lnce
one-sixth interest in the Gertie, said claims will
become the property of the subscriber under said
section 2324.
jan 19. MARTIN O BRIEN
TK[OTICE OF SALE OF REAL ESTATE.
Ll Notice is hereby given that in pursuance of
an order of the probate court ot the county of
Park, territory of Montana, made on the 14tli dav
of January, 1889, in the matter of the estate of
John W. Howell, deceased, the undersigned, the
administrator of the said estate, will 6ell at pri
vate sale, to the highest bidder, for cash, and
subject to confirmation by said probate court, on
Monday, the 11th day of February, 1889. or there
after until all said real estate is sold. Bids will
he received by said administrator at the law office
of Frank Henry, in Livingston, in the county of
Park, all the right, title, interest and estate of the
said John W. Howell at the time of his death,
and all the right, title and interest that the said
estate has, by operation of law or otherwise, ac
quired other than or in addition to that of the
said John W. Howell at the time of his death, in
and to all those certain lots, pieces or parcels of
land situate, lying and being in the said county of
Park, territory of MontanaLand bounded and"de
scribed as follows, to wit: The undivided one
fourth interest in that certain mining claim, vein,
lead or lode, situate, lying and being on the
southern end of Henderson mountain, in the New
World Mining district, and known as the "Alice
E" quartz lode mining claim. The undivided
one-twelfth interest in that certain mining claim,
vein, lead or lode, situate, lying or being on the
east side of Miller mountain, in the New World
Mining district, and known as the "Mornin
Star" quartz lode mining claim. The undivided
one-fourth interest in that certain mining claim,
vein, lead or lode, situate, lying and being on the
east side of Miller mountain, in the New World
Miuing district, and known as the "Monitor«'
quartz lode mining claim. The undivided three
eighths interest in that certain mining claim,
vein, lead or lode, sitnate, lying and being on the
west side of Sheep mountain, in the New World
Mining district, and known as the "Saturn"
quartz lode mining claim. Terms and conditions
of sale: Cash; ten percent of the purchase
money to be paid to the administrator on the day
of sale, balance on confirmation of sale bv said
probate court. Deed at expense of purchaser.
H. C. HOWELL,
Administrator of the estate of John W. Howell,
deceased.
January 14,1889. (1st pub. Jan. 19,188 9.Ï
will
missioners of Park County, Montana Territory,
D. 1889, to canvass
m City special elec
>f such other busi
ness as may properly come before the Board at
that time. D. P. VAN HORNE, County Clerk.
'V'OTICE OF DISSOLUTION OF PARTNER
IN ship —Notice is hereby given that William
Bean and Norris Bean, heretofore doing business
under the firm name of Bean Bros., in the City
of Livingston, Montons territory, is dissolved by
mutual consent. Norris Bean aad Harry Smith
continue the business. Norris Bean collects one
half of outstanding accounts owed to said firm of
Bean Bros., and pays one-half outstanding in
debtedness, William Bean settles for other half of
said business. WILLIAM BEAN.
Dec. 18, 1889. NORIS BEAN.
In at B ozeman, M. T., Jan. 2, 1889.-—Notice is
hereby given that the following named settler has
filed notice of his intention to make final proof in
support of his claim, and that said proof will be
made before the register and receiver at Bozeman,
Montana, on Monday, Feb. 11, 1889, viz: Allen
W. Chadoourn, H. E. V48, for the lot 7, and SE.
of SW. h> see. 16, tp. 9, so. R., 8 east. He names
the following witnesses to prove his continuous
residence upon and cultivation of said land, viz:
George IV. Wakefield, of Mammoth Hot Springs,
W. T., John M ulherin, of Cinnabar, M. T., W. W.
Wiley and II. P. McNaughton, both of Bozeman,
M. T'.
GEO. W. MONROE, Register.
(1stpub. Jan 5 1889.bJ
OTICE FOR PUBLICATION.— Land Office
__at Bozeman, Montana, January 11, 1889.—No
tice is hereby given that the following named set
tler has filed" notic" of his intention to make final
proof in support of his claim, and that said proof
will be made before the judge of the Third ju
dicial district, or in his absence before the clerk
of said district, at Livingston, Montana, on Mon
day, February 25, 1889, viz.: James 8. O'Rourke,
who made Pre-emption D. 8. No. 829 for the
northeast K of section 30, township 4, north of
range 10, east. He names the following wit
nesses to prove his continuous residence upon,
and cultivation of, said land, viz.: James B.
Murphy, George B. Hamilton, Samuel 8. Murphy
and George M.Coe, all of Mversbtirg, Montana.
GEO. W. MONROE, Register.
1st puh. Jan. 19, 1889.]
NOTICE F'OR PUBLICATION.—Land Office
IN at Bozeman, Montana, January 3, 1889.—
Notice is hereby given that the following named
settler has tiled notice of his intention to make
final
proof in support of his claim, and that said
f will be made before the judge of Third
,'l udicial District, or in his absence before the
clerk of said court, at Livingston, M. T.. on
Saturday, February 16th, 1889, viz: Joshua L.
Ridge, who made P. E. No. 956, for the 8E. of
N\V . U of Sec. No. 18, Twp. 4, No. of R. 15 east.
He names the following witnesses to prove
his continuous residence upon and cul
tivation of said land, viz: Herbert O. Hickox,
William L. Linton, John B. Cook and Benja
min Burt, all of Melville, Montana.
GEO. W. MONROE, Register.
[1st pub. jau. 5,1889. j
VT OTICE FOR PUBLICATION.— Land of
!n lice at Bozeman. M. T., Dec. 22,1888—Notice
is hereby given that the following named settlor
has filed notice of his intention to make final
proof in support of his claim, and that said proof
will lie made before the judge of the 3d judicial
district court, or in his absence before the
clerk of said court, at Livingston, Park county,
M. T., on Saturday, February 9, 1889, viz: Robert
C. Griffith, who made homestead entry No. 844
for the W. of fractional S. E. T-, lot No. 8 and
N. E. fractional S. E. K Sec, 6, Tp. 2, south
of range 10 east. He names the following wit
nesses to prove his continuous residence iqion.
and cultivation of, said land, viz: William Miles,
Solomon R. Shrake, Enow W. Sawyer and George
IV. Grant, all of Livingston, Montana.
GEO. W. MONROE, Register.
[First pu >. Dec. 29, 1888j
IVTOTICE TO CO OWNER —To M. Mounts:
IN You are hereby notified that I have expendc
$50 in labor and improvements upon the "Little
queen" and "Wall Street" quartz lode minin
claims, situated in the New World Mining Dii
trict, Park connty, Montana territory, as will ap
pear by the certificates filed with recorder of said
district, in order to hold the said premises, under
provision of section 2324 revised statutes of the
United States, being the amount required to hold
your fractional interests for the year 1888. And
if within ninety days after this notice of publica
tion you fail or refuse to contribute your propor
tion of such expenditures as co-owner, together
with cost of advertising, your interests in said
claims will become the property of the sub
scriber. under said section 2324.
J. L. SANBORN.
Dated Bozeman, M. T., Jan. T, 1889.
(1st pub. Jan. 12, 1889.)
NO OTHER RAILWAY IN THE NORTHWEST
has in so short a period gained the reputation
and popularity enjoyed "by the Wisconsin
Central Line From a comparatively un
known factor in the commercial world, it has
been transformed to an independent, influ'ntial
grand Through Route, with magnificent depots'
stipnrb equipment and unsurpassed terminal fac!
ilities. Throngh careful catering to details, it has
won for itself a reputation for eoliditv, safetv
cjnvenience and attention to its patrons, second
to no railroad in the country. Pullman sleepers
models of palatial comfort, dining cars in which
the cuisine and general appointments aie up*to
the highest standard, and coaches especially bnilt
for this route, are among the chief elements
which have contributed tow arils catering success
fully to a discriminating public. Located directly
on its line, between Minneapolis and 8t. Paul, and
Milwaukee and Chicago, and Duluth and Milw&n
kee and Chicago, are the following thriving cities
of Wisconsin and Michigan: New Richmond.
Chippewa Falls, Ean Claire, Ashland, Hurley!
V> is., Itonwood, Mich —— «*-•- — '
" * "eei
ha.
For detailed information, lowest correct rates
via thio i>AnO a Aa : a. » . • *
" is . »onwood, Mich., Bessemer, Mich., Stevens
Point, Neenah, Menasha, Oshkosh, Fond du Lac
Wankesha, and Burlington, Wis. '
berths, etc., via this route, to any point in thé
address 1 Ea8t ' applj to neare8t Ticket Agent, or
W m S. Mellen, James Barker,
General Manager. Gen. Pass. & Ticket \gent
MILWAUKEE. 8
F. H. Hanson, Northwestern Passenger Axent
Mo. 19 Nicollet House Block, m ff n
I
oi
or
««
CON
STOCK i DAIRY RANCH
12 miles east of Livingston, M. 1.
!
!
C
Finest herd of
Holstein Friesian Cattle
in the Territory.
Young Stock For Sale
rtificates of registrv furnished with each ani
mal. Old stock was all imported, Cæsar bred in
Dientnn, Friesland, winner of three prizes at the
head of herd. Cali at ranch or write to
J. Ni. CONROW,
Livingston, Montana.
ALBEMARLE
Sample Room
MAIN STREET.
Handsomely Equipped with
BILLIARD AND POOL TABLES,
UB ROOMS, ETC.
JOHN O. SAX,
News Dealer!
MAIN STREET
The latest eastern Dailies, Illustrated Journ
als and Magazines always on hand.
Also dealer in
Blank Books and Stationery
TOILET ARTICLES,
Fruits, Confections, Etc.
Call and get priies.
JOHN O. SAX.
irovu 8.000.000 p«°pi« beli(rre that it
pare best to box Beeds
of tbs largest and most reliable house, and they use
Ferry's Seeds
. M. FERRY A CO. are
acknowledged to be tbs
gest Seedsmen
In the world«
. M. Febby ACo'b
llastratod. Descrip
tive and Prioed
►SEED ANNUAL
For 1889
n be mailed FREE
to all applicants, and
to last reaps customers
'without ordering it. Intalu
Earllaat Oeulilovtr I
in exist«»». i §h«»M send for it Address
D.M. FERRY ft CO., Detroit, Mich.
Children
Cry for
PITCHER'S
HSTOBU
Health and Sleep without
Morphine.
"Castoriais so well adapted to children that
I recommend it as enperior to any prescription
known to me. ' H. A. Archer, M. D.
82 Portland Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y.
"I use Castoria in my practice, and find it
specially adapted to affections of children."
Alex. Robertson, M. D.,
1057 2d Ave., New York.
The Centaur Co., 182 Fulton St., N. Y.
Elegant Ba and Fixtures, supplied with the Best
WINES,
ETQtjOKS & CIGARS,
both Imported and Domestic
SHELF3GOODS A SPECIALTY.
GRAT & WETZSTEIN. Managers.
THE MINT SALOON
J. M. KRIPPNER, Prop r.
Old Parlor Restaurant : tand, Main Street.
The Finest Line of Liquors and Cigars in the City
CLUB ROOMS IN CONNECTION.
OYSTERS!
In Every Style
-AT TIIE
O KZ Restaurant.
-MEALS
25 Cents and Upwards.
J. B. Lmgerman, Prop.
The
LEGAL JSLANKS.
now has on Tiand all
oi the follow mg Blanks at the prices quoted,
75 Cts. per Doz.,or 50c Half Doz:
Liens,
Ranch Claims,
Warrantee Deeds.
Deeds of Mining Claims,
Water Right Declarations,
Extension of Chattel Mortgage.
Notice of Minin» Location,
Quit Claim Deeds,
Chattel Mortgages,
Affidavit of Reresentation of Quartz^ Lode? 5 * 8 * 8 "
Leases.
Notes
Mortgage at 50 cents per dozen
or 30 cents per half dozen.
Also, a fall line of Probate Blanks.
«« j y B, "hs not kept in stock will he printed
sq pplied on short notice when ordered,
war Mail Orders promptly attended to.
GEO. H. WRIGHT.
Colt's
Late
Old
dress
I
BARGAINS
i
AT COST !
THOMPSON BROS.,
Are now offering the balance of
their entire stock of Ladies' Cloaks,
Wraps, Childrens' Cloaks, Fur Caps,
Muffs and Fur Sets, and Toboggan
Hoods; also Mens' OvercoatsJFur
Caps, Fur Collar and Cuffs, at actiial
cost. Now is the time to secure
bargains.
These goods were all bought of
the best houses and manufacturers
ê
in the East, and at the present
prices are much lower than they
can possibly be next fall.
Come early while the assortment
is good and get the benefit for the
balance of the winter.
THOMPSON BROS.
ATKINSON & LAHM
-DEALERS IN—
CROCKERY ,
STOVES.
"TINNING DONE
TINWARE ; GLASSWARE ,
LAMPS, ETC.
TO ORDER.
LOWER MAIN ST.,
LIVINGSTON.
OWL RESTAURANT
AND LUNCH COUNTER.
M. JAEGER, Proprietor.
OPEN DAV AND NIGHT.
BEST BRANDS FRESH OYSTERS
In Bulk or Can, always on hand, and sold
at lowest market rates.
Main Street, : : Livingston. M. T.
W. F. SHEARD
Wholesale and Retail Dealer in
r, **«»**!«
AND ALL KINDS OF SPORTING GOODS.
The Largest ami Finest stock of Guns Fishing Tackle, Hunters' and Trappers
Outfits in the West. Prices quoted on application.
Exporter and Dealer in Raw Furs and Hides,
Game Heads, Specimens and Live Game Animals bought. All Kinds of Taxi
dermy Work done to order.
Breech Loading Shot Gnns, double barrel..
Mnzzle Loading Shot Guns, doable barrel.,
Winchester Rifies. 1886 model, 45-90,45-70,40-82, 40-65, 38-56 cal
Winchester Rifles, 1876 and 18»3 models, any cal...............
Colt's Lightning Rifle, 45-85, 45 - 70 , 40-60, 44,38, 32,22 cal....
Late Model Marlin Rifles, 45-85,45-70,40-60, 38-55,32-40 cal..
Old Model of above cal.
..$10 00 to $100 00
5 00 to 15 00
15 00 to 21 00
12 50 to 19 «0
15 00 to 24 00
18 00 to 26 00
15 00 to 16 00
All kinds of Single Shot Rifles at cut prices. All rifles are resighted and guaranteed to shoot
correctly. >11 my rules are made to my order and any rifle coming from me bears my name ana w
dress and is fully warranted in every respect.
I have a lot of Second Hand Rifles and Shet Gnns, very cheep. Good ter
Sheep Camps.
Highest market price paid for Sheep Pelts,
Machine and Gan done in first-class shape. Satisfaction guaranteed.
Montana Agent for
FREUND'S
Hunting Sights.
Reference : National Park Bank. /
Correspondence Solicited. |
sr Prices Quoted on
^ Heads, Hides, Furs
& Pelts at any time
Park St., Livingston, M. T.

xml | txt