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The Livingston enterprise. (Livingston, Mont.) 1883-1914, January 19, 1889, Image 3

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075261/1889-01-19/ed-1/seq-3/

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RAILROAD tinie tables.
Northern
ABnlVE.
Pacific.
So. 1, Limited express (going west).... 3.55 a m
No. :i, Accommodation ex (gomgwest). 6 L 1 » m
No. 2, Limited express (going east)....
x'.. i % A/winitrwwiutwin pt. (ifointr 6ASt). I .4u H.in*
No Accommodation ex. (going east)
No. 13, Freight (going west)............
No. 14, Freight [going east)............
No. 15, Freight (going west '.
No. lfi, Freight (going east).
2:10 a.m.
. 5:45 p.m.
. 2:00 p.m.
. 10:30 a. m.
Minnesota St Northwestern.
Lv. St. Paal Ar. St. Pan
St. Louis & Kansas City.....t«: 10 a.m t7.Wp.rn.
$7:05 pm i#:.# a ra
Chicago, Waterloo * Du
Inique .....................$7:0op.m. *8:30 a.m.
Randolph, Northfield, Fari
bault and Waterville accom
modation..................t4:30 p.m. til :20am
Dodge Center. Rochester,
Austin ana Lyle, accom
modation..................t4:30p.m til :30 a.m.
t Daily except Sunday. JDaily except Saturday.
5Daily except Monday. __
Livingston Postofllce.
Open week days from 8 a. m. to 7:30 p. m.
Sunday!, trom 9:30a. m. to 10:30 a. m.
Money order and register business Irans*
\cted from 8a in. to7:30 p. in., week days.
Mails going west will close at 10:00 a. m (
Mails going east will close at 7:30 p. m.
LOCAL LAYOUT.
the
Owing to the threatened prevalence of
scarlet fever the Livingston schools have
been temjiorarily closed.
Mr. Woods, who lives on Flesh man
creek, was unfortanatc enough to have
his residence considerably damaged by
fire last week.
R. B. Harrison was a west bound pas
senger on the train last Sunday morning
lie was banquetted in Helena by his
friends Monday evening.
McLaughlin & Company have pur
chased the Gordon Bros.' saw mill, on the
park Branch, and intend extending their
lumber operations in Livingston.
The switcli engine met with an accident
this week, which resulted in its being
relegated to the siiops for repair. It had
a slight collision with another engine and
got the worst of the encounter.
There have been discharged at the
shops this week about 30 men. It is said
that like reductions are being made all
along the line to reduce the pay rolls to
the lowest point compatible witli safety
and necessity.
William Dutton n\et with a severe loss
this week in the destruction by fire of
his residence at the ranch west of the
coal spur. It was a two story log house
very nicely built and furnished and
loss is about $1,500.
The workmen are now putting the fin
ishing touches to the new depot and pre
paring it for occupancy. Long and com
modious platforms are being built on both
sides of the track, which is a much
needed step in the right direction.
We are requested to announce that
there will be a caucus of the voters of the
city in the county offices, corner
of Park and Second streets, on Monday
at 7 p. m. All those interested in good
city government are requested to attend.
II. F. Brown, the manager of the Horr
coal mines, was in town this week. He
is shipping a large amount of coal this
month and is making arrangements to put
in coke ovens in the spring in sufficient
number to coke the whole output from
the mines.
We understand that at the request of
the board of county commissioners the
county treasurer lias deferred action in
the matter of the Nelson Story tax suit
until a meeting of the board takes place,
as it is understood that they wish to take
some further action in the matter them
selves.
Mr. James Hall was in town from
Cooke the first of the w'cck, He reports
a very severe earthquake in that locality
last week. He said it was the most pro
nounced shock (hat he had ever exper
ienced in his life. The eclipse at Cooke
was total and was observed with interest
by the residents of that camp.
George Aldcrson has sold tiie Bozeman
Register to his sons, Geo. M., Walter, and
W. L. Aldcrson. W. L. Mallery also pur
chased an interest. The consideration
was $1,500. He has also sold his resi
dence to H. M. Tyler of Spokan Falls for
$3,500. Mr. Geo. Alderson is going fur
ther west it is said, to locate on the Pa
cific Coast.
A basket social was given by the La
dies 1 Society of the Episcopal church on
Thursday evening at the Livingston house.
A large number of tastefully gotten up
baskets, containing very nice lunches,
were sold at auction and brought remu
nerative prices. The attendance was
good, and the evening was passed in a
social and pleasant manner.
C. P. Muiray, the well known rancher
southwest of town, sold this week to
Sherman Bros., on Fleshnian creek, a fine
Norman two-year-old stud colt. He is a
very handsome animal, standing 16£
hands high and weighing 1,350 pounds.
Mr. Murray raised this horse on his ranch
and it speaks well for his enterprise as a
horse grower and reflects credit on the
stock interests of the territory.
Sam Bundock, the well known engineer
and surveyor, says that the report that he
is going to South America is false. He
also says that he couldn't be bought to
leave Montana, as he considers it the finest
country on the face of the earth. Bun
dock is now stopping in Billings awaiting
action in the matter of the Billings,
Clark's Fork A Cooke City railroad,
which, by the way, it is reported will soon
be built.
The bullion, under attachment at the
Castle smelter, was to have been sold-on
Thursday, and probably was. There was
120 tons of bullion under attachment
which is sud to average $100, net profit
to
the
the
sale.
and
by
road
the
by
this
try
ural
tion
for
be
of
sure
tion
good
to
ants
that
from
in
coe
men
off.
their
there
He
that
were
the
this
the
not
and
will
Fork
ment
of a
in
minus
m
m
m.
ra
to the ton. There was some $400 worth
of labor liens upon this bullion the bal
ance being covered by the attachment of
Stebbins & Son. It is understood that
there were quite a number of parties
present at the sale, including several
Helena men.
The wards of the city are temporarily
indicated for the purpose of the coiniug
special election. The first ward consists
of all the city south ef Callendar and
east of Main street. The second ward,
of all south of Callendar and west of Main
street. The third ward, of all north of
Callendar street. The polling places are
the school house, Hosford's office and the
sheriff's office. A mayor, treasurer and
attorney are to be elected from the city at
large and twe aldermen from each ward.
It is desirable that a large vote be polled
so as to give our city a good record from
the start. Any one who is entitled to
vote at the general election can vote at
this city election. Let every voter make
it a point to get to the polls and exercise
his franchise.
The municipal elections will take
place one week from to-day and from
that time forth our local affairs will be
governed by a board of aldermen whose
duties are onerous and important. To a
large extent they have the moral, phys
ical and financial condition of the city
within their control and it is to these that
the city tax-pavers will look for a con
servative wise and economical system of
city government. It needs but a brief
thought to convince any one that especi
ally at this stage of our city's growth I
should capable and responsible men be
selected for these important offices,
Party lines should not be allowed to inter
fere with the selection of good men and
each voter liefore casting his ballot
should consider whether the men be is
voting for are qualified to act in the
above capacity.
The Courier contains the following
Park County mining notes : A. J. Edsall
was in the city Saturday and pilots some
mining men to Emigrant Gulch this week
to examine the Great Eastern. Work at
Mill creek has been suspended for the
winter, the Conductors Mining and Mill
ing company having cut all the lumber
needed for the mill to be erected next
summer. There is tliree feet of snow
now on the level on Mill creek, near the
mill. Joseph T. McKeown, of Cokcdale,
was in the city the first two days of this
week. We were pleased to learn that
Joe's new coal vein is turniug out in fine
shape. It is evidently the same scam as
the one worked at Cokedale, only two
miles west. A tunnel has been driven on
the scam about two hundred feet and two
rooms turned. Excellent coal is being
taken from the mine and it finds a ready
sale. Joe is a patient, persistent worker
and we hope he may evidently reap a
handsome reward for his efforts.
Our attention has been recently called
by some of the miners in the Boulder
mining district to tlie importance of a
road being constructed from Livingston to
the head of the Boulder. It has been said
by some that the expense necessary to do
this was not warranted by the number of
people whom the road would reach.
Those who are acquainted with the coun
try say that the present road via the Nat
ural bridge can be put in excellent condi
tion and a bridge built across the Boulder
for $2,500 at the outside. It would not
be over thirty miles by this road when
completed from Livingston into the heart
of the mining district, and it would in
sure a large amount of travel in this direc
tion which uow goes toother places. The
miners are anxious to see this road put in
good shape, and it would be very much
to the interests of the Livingston merch
ants to see that this is done. We hope
that some action will be taken in this
matter before the spring travel begins
Tom Kent, the well known sheep man
from the Crow reservation, was a visitor
in Livingston last Saturday. He has re
cently had an interview with Agent Bris
coe of the Crows in regard to the white
men and their belongings being moved
off. Mr. Kent said that the agent did not
realize that he was driving away from
their homes some men who had lived
there for from fifteen to twenty years
He fully agreed with the agent, however,
that it would be much better for the in
terests of the Indians if the worthless
squatters who had come on to the reser
vation within the past two or three years
were driven off, but he thinks that some
discrimination should be used, and that
the order compelling all white men on the
reservation to leave is a harsh and unjust
measure. Mr. Kent is fully in earnest in
this matter and is much attached to his
Indian wife and family of children and
resents anything that casts a slur upon
them. Such men as he are of benefit to
the Crows and should be allowed to re
main. He lias considerable property, but
not nearly as much ns he is credited with,
and what property he has got will be tbe
lawful heritage of his Indian family. It
will make them people of independent
means and will afford to the Indians an
example of tbe results of industry.
J. W. Buskett, the auditor of tbe Rocky
Fork road, has been interviewed in
Helena and makes the following state
ment in regard to that road : There is an
immense qnanity of iron on hand and it ia
expected to push tracklaying at the rate
of a mile and a half per day commencing
to-day. A force of men are also engaged
in opening up the coal mines at the ter
minus of the branch, and it is the intçu
on
is
C.
for
bas
the
cil
of
tion to have the road ready for business
,bout the middle of March. Contracts
of
at
I
have already been closed to insure
delivery of 1,000 tons of coal per
The Anaconda smelters will t|^e 300
daily, the Northern Pacific a like amount,
and the balance will be delivered to
points, including the town of Billings.
The coal is of such a quality that as
it is introduced it will be generally used,
not only for its cheapness but its
qualities as well. It is expected to lay
down in Butte for $5 a ton. After
completion of the Rocky Fork road
number of mines will be so increased
over 5,000 tons per may be extracted
from the immense beds.
A conversation with A. M. Quivey,
United States marshal on the Crow reser
ration, develops many points in the trou
ble now going on between tbe squaw
and the agent that are not perhaps per
ceptible to the observer from the outside
He seems to think with many others
the agent is pushing this business too
and that there are quite a number of white
men who are entitled to remain on
reservation and who are an actual benefit
to the Indians. Mr. Quiqey has himself
been for many years a resident among
the Crows, and while his philosophy
become somewhat influenced by his sur
roundings, he still retains much of
quickness and intelligence that must have
characterized him when a younger man
He is said to be an influential adviser
Plenty Coucs, whom he characterizes
the "smartest Indian on the earth." Plenty
Coues most certainly is the most influen
tial Indian among the Crows, and a man
who can control him in any way has
great power for good or evil among the
tribe. Mr. Quivey was asked why the
agent had taxed the cattle men for load
ing cattle at Huntley and Custer stations.
He said that it was necessary to prevent
men from grazing their cattle on the res
ervation for an indefinite length of time,
under a plea of waiting to load. He said
that he had known of several instances
where cattle men had driven on to the
Indian lands and kept their cattle there
two months, thus deriving benefit from
the Indians' grass lands without paying
toll. It had become necessary in his
opinion to tax the cattle on this account.
An interesting document was filed in
the county clerk's office this week. It
was the articles of incorporation of the
Rocky Fork Coal Company of Montana.'
The articles are filed by Samuel T
Hauser, Valentine H. Coombs and Harvey
Barbour, all of Helena, and state that the
purpose for which the company is formed
is to carry on the business of mining,
working, operating, buying, selling and
dealing in coal; to manufacture coke; to
buy sell and deal in coal and coke ; to
own, acquire, buy, sell, lease, trade in
open, work and manage coal mines, coal
lands and the products of such mines and
lands; to buy and sell water rights and
powers and sites thereof. The capital
stock to be $2,000,000; the number of
shares 20,000 ; the corporation to exist for
twenty years and to be governed by five
trustees; the trustees for the first three
months to be S. T. Hauser, Chas. A. Spof
ford, Edward Edes, Alfred Jaretzki and
M. R. Haviland; the principal place of
business to be in the locality of Red
Lodge; Helena, Butte and New York
City being designated as other places of
business. The complexion of the above
organization shows very plainly that the
original incorporators and promoters of
the company cut a very small figure in
the present company, and that ex-Governor
Hauser probably "absorbed," so to speak,
the Rocky Fork coal mines before he
used his influence in the matter of build
ing the Rocky Fork railroad. Likewise,
when this gentleman's name or those of a
few other capitalists begin to appear on
the records as the owners or purchasers of
mines in Cooke City, we will begin to
hope that some attempt will be made to
reach Cooke with a railroad in the near
future, but not until then, as the attrac
tion of the profit to be made in transpor
tation alone is not sufficient to induce
capital to build short railroads, especially
where great natural difficulties exist.
Interest is beginning to awaken in the
city election, which takes place on the
26th, and considerable discussion is going
on in tbe city in regard to tbe merits or
demerits of the men who are available for
the offices to be filled. Public opinion
is a long way from being centered on any
one candidate for mayor, though the
names of a few parties are mentioned with
more frequency than others. Among
them are Arthur Miles, E. Goughnour, J.
C. Vilas, G. T. Chambers, Nick Imo,
Chas. Burg and F. D. Pease. Mr. Vilas
not having been a resident of the town
for a sufficient length of time, is not eli
gible for the office of mayor, but is being
strongly pushed forward by his friends for
alderman from tbe Third ward. Mr.
Chambers, we understand, has refused to
allow his name to be used as a candidate,
likewise Mr. Goughnonr. Major Pease
bas a number of supporters, and Mr.
Miles seems to be the strongly favored.
They are representative business men and
the city would be fortunate in securing
their services in this burdensome and
thankless position. Almost every busi
ness man in town has been mentioned as
possible alderman from his respective
ward. One of the most suitable men
mentioned for an alderman from the
Third ward is Mr. O. Emmons. He
would make an excellent city father and
would use his influence in the city coun
cil for the greatest good of the largest
business cumber. No one has as yet been sug- f
Contracts | gested for the office of city attorney. We
the
day.
tons
amount,
other
Billings.
soon
used,
good
lay it
the
the
that
the
reser
trou
men
per
that
far
white
the
benefit
himself
among
has
sur
the
have
man
of
as
Plenty
man
a
the
the
load
res
time,
said
the
there
from
his
in
It
the
T
the
and
to
to
in
coal
and
and
of
for
five
and
of
of
the
of
in
he
a
on
of
to
to
or
J.
to
understand that Chas. Burg and S. M.
Parks are considerably talked of among
their friends for the office of city treas
urer. The ward caucuses will be held
next week, and until then it is difficult to
predict upon whom the choice of our
people will fall to fill the municipal of
fices. The general feeling seems to be
that the best men available should be
elected, owing to the fact that it will de
pend a great deal upon the first impulse
given to our city government in the be
ginning as to whether it will be a credit
or a discredit to Livingston in the future."'
M. D. Kelly, ex-probate judge, has
opened a law office next door to Babcock
& Miles' hardware 6tore. He will now
devote his time exclusively to the prac
tice of law.
There is a good prospect of an imme
diate settlement of the title to the lots on
which the Episcopal church was built by
mistake. Friends have advanced the
money to settle with the owner of the lots
so that the title will soon be conveyed to
the society.
Mr. Wm. Dalzcll died at Urner's ranch
on Jan. 15th of consumption. Mr. Dalzell
was a sojourner in Montana from Pitts
burg Pa. for his health, but he came here
to late to recover. The funeral services
were conducted by the Rev. Van Ingen
in the school house at Big Timber on the
17 th. A large number of friends were
present.
Mr. and Mrs. Stanton, who live in the
Riverside addition lost two of their chib
dren this week from scarlet fever. One
was a girl 8 years old and the other a
baby 12 months old. This double afflic
tion has fallen heavily upon the bereaved
parents and they have the sympathy of
their many friends in their time of
trouble.
a
PEBS0NAL POINTS.
all
to
as
ago
of
Al. Love was a visitor m Livingston on
Monday.
Attorney Frank Henry made a trip to
Bozeman on Wednesday.
W. W. Beasley and C. T. Busha were
visitors this week from down the road.
County Attorney Joy and wife were in
Helena at the opening of the legislature.
Miss Jennie FitzGerald and Miss Keely
of Gardiner were at the Albemarle this
week.
J. C. Callahan, the well known Miles
City hotel man, was at the Albemarle on
Sunday.
Superintendent Loasby and wife 'were
at Hunter's Hot Springs Saturday and
Sunday.
Hon. George H. Carver left on Sunday
morning for Helena to attend the present
session of the legislature.
Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Hoppe will occupy
the residence of Mr. Elder during the ab
sence of his family in California.
Pierce Hoopes returned from his leave
of absence on Sunday and resumed his
duties in the Northern Pacific office at
this point.
Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Henderson re
turned on Friday from their wedding trip
west. They left on Tuesday for their
home iu the National Park.
Mr. Root and family paid a visit to
Livingston in their special car on Monday
night, returning Tuesday morning to
Helena where they are now permanently
located.
J. A. Hatt^ of Anoka, Minnesota, a
relative of Mr. Hatt who died at Hunters
Hot Springs last week, was in town this
week being called here by the decease of
his relative.
J. R. Blackhart, of Hailey, Idaho,
came in from the west on Wednesday
and left on Thursday for Cooke City to
look over the work recently done on the
Alice E, in which an interest is owned by
his brother.
Mrs. J. H. Elder and child left on
Tuesday morning for a two months' visit
in California. Mrs. Elder will visit her
uncle, Mr. Henry Wright, who resides
there. They were accompanied as far as
Helena by Mr. Elder, who returned to
Livingston Thursday.
J. J. Nickey, manager of the Billings
Grand hotel, was a west bound passenger
Sunday morning. He says that the lot
tery scheme is being well received and
that the tickets are selling very rapidly.
This is on account of tbe properties being
so well known and the scheme being fath
ered by responsible parties.
Dr. Alton and wife made a trip to
Helena this week. The doctor was in
attendance upon a special session of the
Montana Medical association. The meet
ing was devoted principally to the form
ation of a bill, for the protection of the
profession from "quacks." Dr. Alton
says it is a very fair bill and will prob
ably pass the legislature without any
trouble.
Bed Lodge Notes.
Red Lodge is looking lively, the sound
of hammer and saw being heard on all
sides.
Mr. Sam Hanson lias bought the Hobbs
building and is fitting up the same as a
restaurant.
Messrs. Davis A Budd of Bozeman
have rented a building and will shortly
open a saloon m our village»
Mr. Thomas Mulvey has opened a res
taurant in the H. M. Woodward building.
J. H. Conrad & Co. have put iu a brauch
house here.
Babcock & Miles bave reopened their
on
on
the
Mr.
day
at
This
affair
made
of
and
usual
ing
dence
To
I
for
the
with
ed
to
ment
chance
The
Iowa,
000.
the
the
ready
the
crystal
ary
house
now
that
Ice
of
money
have
system
in
gists.
fresh
ferlm
orders
A
fered
ford's
port,
Krieger
Bros.
Krieger
elegant
away
THE
f hardwaie store, Mr. Talmage in charge.
We
M.
to
B. S. Scott & Co. are putting in a stock
of drugs, Charles Patterson in charge.
Geo. Town has a logging contract on
the west fork of Rock creek.
F. A. White had the misfortune to get
a valuable mule's leg broken at the log
ging camp a few days since.
Considerable opposition is developing
to the petition attaching us to Yellow
stone county and if the Enterprise was
more generally re id the opposition would
be much greater. A rcmonstance would
receive the signatures »four heaviest tax
payers. E. D. Parks.
■ Claims Heine Paid.
The Billings Gazette says in in its last
week's issue: Elsewhere in this issue
^Jesars. Platt and Cooper give notice to
all parties Jipjdlhg claims against the
Rocky Fork Railway company for old in
dedtedness to present them without delay
to either of the gentlemen at the Grand
hotel in order that they may be passed
lipop Jpr settlement. This is about the
best news that has copie to tjie people of
Yellowstone county during the past year
as the settlement of the claims in question
means that many thousands of dollars are
soon to be distributed among the merch
ants, contractors and laborers who a year
ago hàd dealings with the original Rocky
Fork Railway company. The payment
of these claims on the part of the com
pany will relieve many a poor devil from
spending restless nights on account of
money obligations hanging over his head,
which he would have gladly met had he
been able to see his way clear.
A Grand Mausqerade Ball
Will be given at the Park Opera House
on the 25th of January. The committee
on invitation are D. P. Van Horne, S. F.
Whitney, L. F. Crippcn, Carl Peterson
Thejtickets will be $2 for admittance to
the Opera House without supper. The res
taurants are making arrangements to ac
commodate those who wish refreshments
Mr. Swanson will be at the Opera House
between the hours of 3 and 5 p. in the
day before and the day of the ball, to
furnish intending masqueraders with suits
at a reasonable rental. Tickets for the
dance are for sale at Peterson's drug store.
This Masquerade will be the most unique
affair of the season. The music will be
excellent and every arrangement will be
made for the comfort and entertainment
of the guests.
Church Matters.
Congregational : Preaching at 11 a. m.
and at 7:30 p. m.
Episcopal : No Sunday services. The
Sunday school will be closed until the
reopening of the public schools. Friday
evening service at 7 o'clock.
Services at the Methodist church to
morrow both morning and evening at the
usual hours. Sabbath school at 12
o'clock.
Baptist: Preaching at 7:30 p. m.
Sunday school at 2 p. m. Prayer meet
ing Thursday evening at 7:30 at the resi
dence of Mrs. II. E. Harmon.
Announcement.
To the Voters of Livingston:
I hereby announce myself a candidate
for the office of mayor ot Livingston, at
the election to be held on the 26th of this
month. To those who are acquainted
with me it is unnecessary to say anything
further. From those who are unacquaint
ed with me I ask further investigation as
to my fitness for the position. Yours re
spectfully, Nick Imo.
THE BIG LOTTERY AT HELENA.
$60.000 For $1—$300,000 For $5.
Send $1 to $5 to the Montana Invest
ment company, Helena, Montana, for a
chance in their prize distribution March 30
The $300,000 Aborn House, Des Moines,
Iowa, and 153 cash prizes from $10 to $5,
000. Whole tickets, $5; fifths, $1. Re
memberthat the deed to the capital prize,
the Auborn House, is now in escrow at
the First National bank, Helena, M. T.,
ready to be turned over to the holder of
the winning ticket.
Notice to Ice Consumers.
Parties desiring to make contracts for
crystal ice for next season can do so by
applying to the undersigned until Janu
ary 1, 1889. Having built a large ice
house in addition to my other one, I am
now enabled to furnish ice to every one
that wants it, in Livingston and suburbs.
Ice will be delivered every morning free
of charge. Respectfully, A. Landt.
Entitled to the Best.
All are entitled to the best that their
money will buy, so every family should
have at once a bottle of the best family
remedy. Syrup of Figs, to cleanse the
system wheu costive or bilious. For sale
in 50c and $1 bottles by all leading drug
gists.
SPECIAL MENTION.
Don't fail to call at Hefferlin Bros.
Mince-meat, apple-butter, jellies and
preserves in bulk, at Hefferlin Bros.
Wienerwurst, Fiuuan Haddies and
fresh Mincemeat, at Krieger & Co.'s.
Fresh oysters in bulk and cans at Hef
ferlm Bros.'
Use printed stationery and leave your
orders for the same at this office.
A bankrupt stock of goods is now of
fered for sale in tbe building next to Hos
ford's office, on Main street, by N. Daven
port, manager.
Cooking apples $2.50 per barrel at
Krieger & Co.'s.
Headquarters for apples at Hefferlin
Bros.
Cooking apples $2.50 per barrel at
Krieger & Co.'s.
Hefferlin Bros, iiave just received an
elegant assortment of fine vases, lamps,
glassware, etc., which they are giving
away with baking powder, which they
guarantee good quality.
N. IMO,
Barber and Hair Dresser,
Hefferlin Bloc*, Main Street.
THE MOST EXPERT WORKMEN EMPLOYED
Scarf
Pens
Best
on
ALBEMARLE DRUG STORE!
HEADQUARTERS FOR
Pure Drugs, Patent Medicines,
Druggist's Sundries, Fancy Goods,
Toilet Articles and Artists' Tvra.+o„ iqi f ,
Paint Brushes and Fishing Tackle,
Imported and Domestic Cigars,
Stationery, Etc., Etc.,
Our Stock of Spectacles and Eye Glasses lathe Largest in the Valley.
We Guarantee a
intention to stay in Livingston and to push ourselves forward and
selling only first class goods and at the most reasonable
profits. Those „ho come o,Ä "Ômé ^ m# *'° " " h * •«»"
It is our
we intend to do so bv
price. Come one and all and
•gain,
M
A. PETERSON.
Albemarle Hotel, - - Livingston, M. T.
ALBEMARLE DRUG STORE,
Agent for the Great English Remedies.
^ re lSyi?reguîar < pharmàc"st offiO and
Orders from the country promptly attended to.
BABCOCK & MILES.
Montana's Largest Wholesale and Retail
Dealers in
HARDWARE
BAIN WAGONS!
-All Styles of
Heating and Conk Staves,
Tinware, Builders' Supples, Tin and
Sheet-Iron Work of all kinds.
[Qr'Call in and see our new Heaters
GO
I. ORSCHEL 4 BRO.,
'FOR YOUR
WINTER CLOTHING!
Hats, Caps, Boots, Shoes and
Gents' Furnishing Goods.
(X)
LAR6EST STOCK !
LOWEST POICES !
Bargains can still be had in the
BANKRUPT STOCK
-OF
Dry Goods, Doots and Shoes,
Carpets, Oil Cloths, Etc.
For sale in the building near Hosford's office, Main street.
DAVENPORT, Manager.
N.
It will pay you to inspect this stock as you will be astonished at the
prices for first class articles of goods.
W. P. MULHOLLAND,
--AT THE
City Jewelery Store !
Makes a display of Holiday Goods that is seldom equaled and never surpassed, in a town
of the size of Livingston. Here is a partial list of the many pretty things
he has to offer customers :
LADIES' AND GENTS' SOLID GOLD AND GOLD FILLED WATCHES AND W'ATCH CHAINS,
An endless variety of Finger Rings, at prices varying from $1 to $100.
CALIFORNIA GOLD QUARTZ JEWELRY I
Scarf Pins, Sleeve Buttons, Stnds, Gold Filled and Silver Thimbles. Finest assortment o^Gold
Pens in the Territory. Ladies' Sets, Pins and Ear-rings. Full line of Clocks. Solid Silver and the
Best quality silver Plated ware—Knives, Forks, Spoons, Castors, Pickle Castors, Fruit, Berry and
Preserve Dishes, Card Receivers, Butter Knives, Sugar Shells, Napkin Bings and other articles too
numerous to mention. If yonr presents are to be anything in Gold or Silver you will certainly And
something to please yon by caUlng on W, P. MULHOLLAND at the City Jewelry Store.

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