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The Livingston enterprise. [volume] (Livingston, Mont.) 1883-1914, July 20, 1889, Image 2

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MVINCSTON, MONTANA.
i
1
OFFICIAL I'APEK OF PARK COI NTY
GEI. H. WRIGHT, - - - Editor and Proprietor.
SATURDAY, JULY 20, 1889.
Enti'p'il »t th*» postofflep in Livingston. M
»«fécond class mail matter
t
It is estimated in Washington that
gtßö/xyi can be prolitably expended on
improvements of the Yellowstone river
during the <
>ming fiscal year.
The Hiver Press fails to understand
the grounds upon which republicans
claim Montana. In the language of
Brothef Sear les himself, it can truth
fully be said: "It's the tariff, my boy;
the tariff. "
pub
The Montana Wool Grower,
lished at Fort Benton, is to be enlarged
an»l the name changed to the Montana
Stockman. Instead of confining its
work to the sheep industry, its scope
will lie widened to include all branches
of the live stock industry.
i
j
Secretary Noble has decided to ap
point a commission to negotiate with
the Sissetons for the cession of that
part of their reservation that is not
taken by allotment. The commission
will have to be detailed from the new
men now in the government's service,
as there are now no funds on hand to
pay a commission made up outside.
The minority report of Watson of
Fergus county to the constitutional
convention, recommending the publi
cation of laws in all weekly newspapers
throughout the state, is worthy ot fav -1
orable consideration. The people should | C
know the laws they are expected to <they j
and we know of no better or more !
economical provision for placing them I t'
before the public than that suggested
in this minority report.
The most important act of consolida
tion of official administrative duties
that has taken place in Washington in
recent years was quietly effected last
week. It is the creation of a new bu
reau of the war department, in direct
connection with the office of secretary
of war, in which are brought together,
under the jurisdiction of one officer, the
most important records of the war in
relation to the rights of applicants for
invalid pensions. The consolidation
was made in the interest of improved
public service, to facilitate the state
ment of records as the basis of action
upon the thousands of pension cases
which it is so desirable to dispose of
with greater speed than heretofore.
The dispatches from "Washington in
dicate that there is likely to be a gen
eral shaking up in the land offices
shortly, as the new special agents who
have been looking into affairs through
out the west have made some rather
nasty discoveries in connection with
the reform administration of General
Sparks. It appears that the latter was
so thoroughly occupied in seeking rea
sons for refusing homestead claims that
he entirely overlooked tliefiamio that
were being perpetrated in his name.
In view of the reports as submitted to
the interior department, it has been de
cided that further investigation will be
useless until a good many changes have
been made in the list of registers and
receivers.
It is now given out that the republi
can committee does not contemplate as
suming any responsibility in connec
tion with the direction of the campaign
in Montana or any of the new states.
This will be in keeping with the wishes
of a majority of the republican party of
Montana. The party in this territory
has demonstrated its ability to success
fully conduct its affairs within itself,
and will only ask such assistance as the
national administration can render by
carrying out the spirit and letter of
party measures, as laid down in the
campaign of last summer. The whole
some effect that an assurai tariff on
wool has produced in a firm and ad
vanced price for this commodity has
demonstrated the wisdom of protection,
and will add many voters to the repub
lican ranks. Now let the lead-ore pro
ducers be protected by a favorable rul
ing from the importation of Mexican
lead, and there is little reason to fear
republican defeat in the fall campaign.
The Hillings Gazette takes the corre
spondent of the New Y'ork Tribune to
task for his advocacy of a right of way
for a railroad to Cooke from Cinnabar
through the northern boundary of the
Park. Its stereotyped cry is raised that
mercenary motives influenced Mr.
(}uigg in arriving at his conclusions in
the matter. This is an unjust accusa
tion and wholly unwarranted by any
facts. The opinion of Mr. Quigg is only
in accord with that reached by every
unprejudiced observer after a careful
investigation of the two routes pro
posed. The originators of the Clarke's
F ork railroad to Cooke we believe nev
er seriously contemplated the construc
tion of a road to that camp. The
scheme was sprung to defeat a right of
way from Cinnabar, when that measure
was before congress for consideration,
and it has been successfully interposed
by sentimentalists averse to the latter
route whenever brought to the atten
tion of congress, on the flimsy pretext
that a railroad would desecrate the
national pleasure ground. The Clarke's
Fork schemers are now upon their an
nual survey preparatory to talking
railroad building again next winter
when the Cinnabar route will again be
brought up for action by congress.
The ostensible manager of the Post,
in retreating from the intenable posi
tion taken in his communication to the
city council with reference to the city
printing, seeks to cover his crawfish
movements by a deliberate falsehood.
The contract was awarded to the En
terprise by the city clerk in presence
of Mr. Whelpley, and in accordance
with an order of the city council. This
he dare not deny. The language attrib
uted by the Post to the city clerk at
last week's council meeting Is in direct
conflict with that gentleman's actual
statement, as well as with the recorded
minutes of the meeting. This is also a
fact that no one but the editor of the
Post would have the reckless hardihood
to dispute. The intimation that mem
i
no
in
can
ican
the
ing
of
into
tion
cans
by
one
of
stop
be
a
it
to
the
list
by
blue
the
rian
all
soil
that
no
in
the
land
ing
tion
but
or
ent
of
ject
nies
the
be
way
or
i bers of the council have privately given
1 opinions favorable to the Post is an in
sult to the business integrity of that
body and unworthy of public discussion.
fJ
The "ostensible manager" should de
sist an<l accept the inevitable, as his
rations only reveal the lacerated con-1
dition of his feelings and subject him
to ridicule. Public sympathy can not |
be enlisted bv such an exhibition of 1
t business inexperience.
A special meeting of the city council
was held Thursday evening to consider
a proposition" from C. II. Stebbins, I.
Orscliel ami S. llundock for supplying
i the city with water works. These gen
j tlemen pledge themselves to put in an
adequate water supply for public and
private use provided the council will
grant a franchise and take at least.
twenty-four hydrants at an annual ren- j
tal of .*100 each. As two of the mem- j
bers of the council were absent, and it !
deemed advisable that hasty action ,
was
l»e not taken, the matter was laid ov
until Tuesday evening next. The ques- '
tion of a sullicient supply of pure water
for the city is one of vital importance, j
affecting not only our business welfare
but the health of the community. That
the present arrangement is wholly in
adequate for lire purposes and deleteri
ous to the health of the people there
exists no doubt. The benefits to accrue
from waterworks, such as are proposed,
will not only be directly felt in ample
security against lire, but will indirectly
prove an advantage in reducing the
prevailing high rate of insurance. We
believe that no better expenditure could
be made by the council, nor one that
would meet with more universal com
mendation, than in providing against a
wide-spread conflagration, and we trust
the proposition submitted, or one
as advantageous, will be ac
-1 equally
| C epted.
j ""—
! * * ie presence in the
I t' I1,e °t Senator
territory at this
Vest of Missouri and
Sunset Cox of New Y'ork, two of the
i leading apostles of free trade, may have
no political significance, but it would
seem to be more than a mere coinci
dence. In the interests of republican
success we trust they will remain and
stump the territory upon the tree trade
platform of the democratic party, and
in accordance with the previously an
nounced programme. The people of
Montana are inlluenced by political con
victions and not through prejudice.
They are conscious of the benefits of
protection, as evidenced by the in
creased price of wool by reason of re
publican success. They also note the
recent rise in the price of lead occa
sioned by the probability that republi
can protection will be applied to this
industry in reversing the ruling by
which Mexican lead is permitted to
come in direct competition with Amer
ican silver-lead producers. Realizing
the vital importance of these leading
industries, and the necessities of throw
ing around them the fostering arm of
protection, we believe the voters of
Montana will repudiate the teachings
of eastern protectionists and the repub
lican party will profit by their advent
into the territorv.
in
Press Comment
Helena Ilorald : If the adininisf ra
tion is solicitous to assist the republi
cans of Montana it can do so by expi
diting Windom's decision upon the
matter of imposing the duty provided
by law upon the Mexican lead ores
shipped into the United states. The
secretary of the treasury has done ns
one good service in correcting evasions
of the wool tariff. It would be in the
same line and is just as clear a duty to
stop the fraud on lead ores.
Inter-Mountain: "We hope there will
be no opposition to the incorporation of
a provision in the constitution making
it an offense for any corporation after
discharging an employe to make any
effort to prevent his securing work
elsewhere. The right of a corporation
to discharge an employe is as good as
the right of an employe to quit
work when he so elects; but serious
harm to labor may result whenever a
corporation is allowed to keep a black
list and prevent the employment of men
by other corporations or individuals.
Helena Journal: The question might
naturally be asked, Have the days of
blue laws gone by ? The attempt by a
most estimable body of men to induce
the convention to embody a Sabbatha
rian clause in the constitution would
justify such a question. The memorial
presented at yesterday's session, though
painful to every religious man of
whatever sect, contains many home
truths, and among a large amount of
verbiage which verges on the profane
there is a considerable substratum of
common sense, which should be given
all the consideration it deserves
River Press: The present season has
thoroughly tested the capability of the
soil of Northern Montana to raise crops
without irrigation. None will deny
that if even half a crop can be pro
duced in a season like the present one
no reasonable fears need be entertained
concerning its agricultural possibilities
in the future. "Without predicting what
the crops will be we venture to say that
those in northern Montana will size up
with those elsewhere in Montana upon
land surrounded by irrigating ditches.
Polygamy Not Permitted.
The constitutional convention of
Idaho, in session at Boise City, is pav
ing the way for admission by the next
session of congress. The bill of rights
reported strikes at the Mormon ques
tion in guaranteeing religious freedom,
but not tolerating or excusing acts of
licentiousness or justifying polygamous
or other pernicious practices inconsist
ent with the morality, peace or safety
of the state, or permit any person, or
ganization or association to aid or abet,
counsel or advise any person to commit
bigamy, polygamy or other crime. No
property qualification is permissible for
voting or holding office. All males be
tween eighteen and lorty-five are sub
ject to military duty. Military compa
nies must carry no flag except that of
the United States. The legislature is to
be composed of one senator from each
county, with twice that number of rep
resentatives; the senators to serve four
years, representatives two. Corpora
tions received much attention in the
way of restrictions; preventing rail
roads from pooling and discriminations
or consolidating with parallel lines.
in
of
is
by
of
of
in
be
a
for
for
now
will
by
in
I bark County's Representatives.
1 hrough the courtesy of the Helena
Independent we are enabled to present
our readers with biographical sketches
de- j Park county s representatives in the
his : constitutional convention, as well as
con-1 portraits of Messrs. Joj and 1 ields:
major geouge o. baton.
not | A '»an who is pretty certain to leave
of 1 the impress of his hand upon the eon
I.
an
j
j
it !
,
' at the
lege, New
j the service
stitution, and whose right of leadership
was recognized by the republicans who
honored him with their votes for tem
porary president of the convention, is
Major George O. Eaton of Park county,
lie was born in Maine in 1848. He
served during the war in the Fifteenth
Maine volunteers, and upon being dis
charged at the close ot the war resumed
his business of land surveying in Maine.
In 1869 he was appointed a cadet at the
United states military academy at
West Point. He was graduated there
from in 1873 and assigned to duty with
the Fifth cavalry, having in the mean
time taken a special course of one year
liool of mines, Columbia col
York c ity. He resigned from
in lssi and came to Mon
tana, where he has since followed the
business of mining both quartz and
placer. He was a delegate from Mon
tana to the national republican conven
tion at Chicago which nominated Mr.
Harrison for president. His residence
is Cooke City and Gardiner Montana.
ALLAN It. JOY.
The junior republican member of the
Twentieth district (Park county) was
born in Maine in
1859 of old New
England parents.
His father being a
sea captain, he
spent much of his
early youth at sea.
When still young
he removed to
Massachusetts, re
maining in that
state until 1881. In 1883 he came to
Montana and settled in Livingston, in
the practice of law, enjoying a large
and lucrative clientele. Upon the or
ganization of Park county he was se
lected as the first chairman of the re
publican county committee. He was
appointed county attorney and after
wards elected to that office. He is a
staunch republican, a prominent worker
in his party, and will prove an able ami
industrious member of the constitu
tional convention.
WILLIAM T. FIELD.
Mr. Field was elected as a democrat,
and represents in a particular degree
the working men
of Montana. lie
was born in Joliet,
Illinois, August 13,
185s. His father
lost his life in the
union army dtir
the civil war. At
theagejof 18 young
Field began work
for the Chicago,
Rock Island & Pacific railway as fire
man on a locomotive running out of
Chicago. He became a member of the
Brotherhoob of Locomotive Firemen,
and in 188U attended the annual con
vention of the brotherhood of the
United states as delegate, an honor
WIilcli lias been cuufciied upon him
every year since, last year represent
ing Montana at the convention held
in Atlanta, Georgia. Mr. Field united
with the Knights of Labor five years
ago, and at present is the statistician of
of the order for district number 98,
comprising the whole of Montana. He
has represented the order at three an
nual conventions of the general assem
bly of the Knights of Labor. Mr. Field
is not a politician, but has always acted
with the democratic party, and last fall
was the nominee for member of the up
per branch of the legislative assembly,
but was defeated by George M. Hatch
by thirty-six votes in a strongly repub
lican district. For the last six years
Mr. Field has been employed as a rail
way engineer on the Livingston division
of the Northern Pacific line.
Henry M. Stanley, the African ex
plorer. is expected back in London by
next September. He has already been
booked for a series of lectures, the first
of which is to be delivered early in
October. . lie is to receive $250 a night
for the lectures delivered in London
and 6400 a night in the provinces.
Treasurer Huston has directed that
hereafter in the redemption of legal
tender notes the "three-fifths rule'' used
in redeeming national bank notes shall
be observed. The rule provides that
where three-fifths of a note is presented
for redemption the full amount of the
note shall be paid. If less than three
fifths is presented the note will not be
recognized unless the tender can ac
count for the missing pieces. Hereto
fore notes were redeemed according to
the percentage of the note presented.
A base ball nine of college men is
now on the "Umbria," bound for Eng
land. They go under English patron
age to teach the game to Englishmen.
The expenses of the trip, including 620
a week for each man's'personal expen
ses, will be met by the Englishmen
managing the scheme. Among the
players are Willard, twice captain ot
the Harvard nine; Ilenshaw. who has
caught for Harvard; Noyes, captain of
this year's nine at Y'ale; Calhoun and
Logers, also of Y'ale; and King, for sev
eral years Princeton's pitcher. In Eng
land the matched nines will be made up
half of our college men and half of the
Englishmen.
Another Phase of the Chinese «Question.
Washington dispatch, 15th: Acting
Secretary Batchelor was in telegraphic
correspondence to-day with C. P. Hunt
ington, president of the Southern Pa
cific railroad, in regard to the case of
twelve Chinese coolies who arrived at
New Orleans en route to San Fran
cisco. The collector held that their
landing was prohibited by the Chinese
act, while the railroad contended they
were entitled to the privilege of transit
across United States territory as priv
ileged tourists. The acting secretary
informed Huntington that the collector
acted in accordance with a previous de
cision of the department, but would
comply with the request of the trans
portation company to postpone further
action until the question can be pre
sented in a diplomatic way through the
Chinese legation at Washington. In
the {.meantime the collector was in
structed to detain the Chinese and not
allow them to land.
HOGS.
The "Grassdale" stock of thoroughbred Berk
shires, all registered in the American Berkshire
Association Stud Book, permits of present orders
for young ptgs being shortly carried oat by the
owner. Boars, sovvsjor couples at reduced prices
for sale. "Sailie, r "Model" and "Charmer"
breed, the superiority of which is nndoabted, is
now offered. The easiest kept, greatest weight
capacity, soonest fattened, gentlest disposition,
most prolific and most maternal race of hogs
known. A limited snpply and only one advertise
ment will be inserted. Pedigrees in each case
will be furnished. Apply personally to view, or
by letter to WALTER GOODALL,
Grassdale, Mont.
Shields Hirer, near Livingston.
as
w
Celebrated French Cure,
APHRODITINE"
is
BEFORE
or money
to cine n * imi/iii iiiiu rofun.Ltl.
Is Soi.d os A
POSITIVE
GUARANTEE
to cure n n y
form of nervous
isetise, or any
disorder of the
enerative or
nons of either
■x whether nr- . _
ising from the AFTER
excessive use of Stimulants, Tobacco or Ooinm.
or through youthful indiscretion, over indulg
ence, Ae., such ns Loss of Brain power, Wakeful
uess. Bearing down l'ains in the Back, Seminal
" enkness, Hc .-ieria, Nervous Prostration Not tnrn
«1 Emissions. I.eiicorrlnca, Dizziness, Weak Mem
ory, loss of Pocverand Impoteney, which if ne
glected often lend to jireimitutco'dagean«! insan
ity. Pi ice Sl ot) a box. 6 boxes for Î.V00 Seat bv
mail on receipt of price.
A WUITTKN GUARANTEE forevervOP
order, to refund the money if a 1'eniianciiC
ctire is not elTected Thousands of testimonials
from old ail'l young, of both sexes, permanently
cured by Athhoditink. Circular free. .Address
THE APHRO MEDICINE CO.
WESTEBN nr- tSTH,
BOX 27 PORTLAND, OR
PETERSON'S PHARMACY,
Sole Ai.exts, - - Livingston, Montana.
Children
Cry for
PITCHER'S
USTOMJI
Health and Sleep without
Morphine.
"('astoria iä so «ell adapted to children th
1 recommend it as superior to any prescription
known to me." H. A. Abcheb, M. I).
82 Portland Yve., Brooklyn, N. Y.
"I use Ciisti'ria in my practice, and find it
specially adapted to affections of children."
Alex. Kobebtson, M. D.,
10ÖT 2d Ave., Ne« York.
The Centaur L'o., 1S2 Fulton St., N. Y.
SPECIAL
Clearing Sale.
• NEXT no DAY!
for o.ir Fall
i order to
i k, all on
DIG!
LIGHT WEIGHT
UNDERWEAR
STRAW HATS !
nid .it price? that « ill astonish
i. Here are a few ot our
Bargains:
$18 Suits for $12.
$15 Suits for $10.
$12 Suits for $8.
$8 Suits for $6.
LIGHT-WEIGHT UNDERWEAR AT COST
Straw Hats at Yonr Own Price.
I.Orschel&Bro.
Park Street, Livingston.
J. W. JOHNSON,
General Blacksmithing.
FINE HORSESHOEING
A 8FEe!AI.TT.
Als has Wagon shop in connection anti is prepar
ed to do all kinds of Wood Work.
0. K. RESTAURANT !
East side Main Street.
Linger man & Pennicott, Propra.
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT.
Tables supplied with every Delicacy the
market affords.
THE
Livingston Gandy Factory
F. C. REED, Proprietor.
ALL
Wholesale and retail dealer in
KDIDS OF (MUM.
-[o]
Lower Main Street,
LIVINGSTON. - MONTANA.
Carver Mercantile Company,
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
GROCERIES,
DRY GOODS,
BOOTS, SHOES,
Hats and Gents' Furnishing Goods.
We are receiving Carloads of Groceries daily, and can Undersell Any Firm in this part of
Montana. We are sole agents for the folio« ing celebrated brands of
FLOUR
•'GOLD HEART" BRAND.
BEST OK ALL" BRAND.
'ORANGE BLOSSOM" BRAND.
tSr'We carry in stock MONTANA FLOUR.
-We are Sole Agents for
THE SAFETY NITRO-POWDER CO.
We say to the Ladies that we carry the I arrest and Finest Stock ot
LADIES' SHOES AND SLIPPERS
In our Stock they can find the Famous "Hough Jc Ford." "Gray Bros." and
Bros." Shoes and Slippers, in all sizes and styles, and will guarantee a fit.
We have a large stock of
'Zeigler
Misses', Children's and Infants' Shoes.
Men's & Boys' Boots & Shoes
In All Styles.
Men's Shoes at from $1.50 to $8.00.
Men's Knee Rubber Boots for $2.25.
Men's Hip Rubber Boots for $2.75.
do agents for the
Goodyear Suag-Proof Rite Boots and "Gold Seal" Rita.
We have just received a large stock c
T
All Wool and Silk Warp Henrietta Cloth, Ladies' Cloth, Sicilian Mohair,
Drap d' Alma, Royce Cashmeres, All Wool Plaids and Checks,
Opera and Basket Flannels, Nnn's Veiling, and a
Fine Line of Worsted Goods, which
we are selling at Greatly
Reduced Prices.
Hamburg and Swiss Embroideries, Embroidered Robes,
The Celebrated
FOSTER KID GLO VES
PARASOLS & UMBRELLAS,
In all Styles and Prices to Suit.
Trunks and Valises,
CARPETS.
Ask for Anything, and we have it.
W. P. MULHOLLAND,
--AT THE
City Jewelry Store !
Makes a display of Goods that is seldom equaled and never surpassed, in a to« n of the
size of Livingston. Here is a partial list of the many pretty things
he has to offer customers:
LADIES' AND GENTS' SOLID GOLD AND GOLD FILLED WATCHES AND WATCH CHA INS
An endless variety of Finger Rings, at prices varying from $1 to $ino.
CALIFORNIA GOLD QUARTZ JEWELRY
Scarf Pins, Sleeve Buttons, Studs, Gold Filled and Silver Thimbles. Finest assortment of Gold
Pens in the Territory. Ladies'Sets, Pius and Ear-rings. Full line of Clocks. Solid Silver and the
Best quality silver Plated ware—Knives, Forks, Spoons. Castors, Pickle Castors, Fruit, Borrv and
Preserve Dishes, Card Receivers, Butter Knives, Sugar Shells, Napkin Rings and other article's too
numerous to mention, if .yon wish to purchase anything in Gold or Silver vou «ill certainly find
something to please you by calling on W, P. MULHOLLAND at the City Jewelry Store.
For 30 DAYS
Wm. Losekamp
—Will sell at—
GREATL.Y
REDUCED PRICE !
All Summer Underwear, straw
Hats, Summer Clothing,
Base Ball and Lawn
Tennis Shoes.
Making Room For Fall Goods.
ALBEMARLE HOTEL BUILDING,
Main Street,
Livingston, M. T.
THOMPSON BROS.,
Have a store full of New Goods,
and Novelties are to be found in ev
ery corner. Our counters are load
ed with the newest patterns of dress
goods. An immense line of Ladies
Gloves and Mits. We have a double
dose this spring, and accordingly
have marked them at the very low
est possible prices.
We have just unpacked a large
line of Long Handled Parasols. The
length of them will surprise you and
they are of the latest and most novel
patterns.
In dress trimmings we can match
any goods and have, with other nov
elties, added a full line of the Persian
Band trimmings, which are very
popular.
Our line of dress goods is more
complete than ever before, and ladies
intending to purchase are invited to
call and look at our goods and prices
and if not satisfied, have our good
will to go elsewhere.
We have added to our already
large stock of Ladies' Shoes and Slip
pers. Butterick's Patterns in stock
and the monthly sheets distributed
free. If we miss any one in mailing,
please ask for them when in town.
Particulars about Clothing, Fur
nishing Goods, Hats and Caps, and
our stock of Groceries to appear in
the near future.
THOMPSON BROS.
TheWHITELEY !
Whiteley's All-Steel Mowers and Binder
on Machines.
are Leading the World
FACTS SPEAK LOUDER THAN WORDS.
A mowing machine superior in strengh, lightness and draft.
amt draft. Has
five and one-half more cuts to the revolution of the wheel than any
other mower. A wide tread. Runs and clears knife bar when back
ing up. Movable bearings. Its parts are turned and not cast out of
solid steel. Will cut from 1 to 2-in. green willows without stopping.
UTAH'S SPLENDID RECORD.
How the Agent
for the Old-Style Machines are NOT getting
there in 1SS'>.
Salt Lake City, Utah, June 1,1889.
Amos Wiiiteley «& Co. —Y'ou have shipped us 375 Whiteley
"Solid Steel" Mowers and Binders so far this season, and at this date
we have them all sold, and have run so close on Whiteley Mowers
that we have been buying back a few from agents whose trade does
not begin until somewhat later. We have about 100 of the Mowers
at work in the Lucetne fields of Utah, and they are not only pleasing
their owners but exciting the enthusiastic admiration of their neigh
bors as well. Agents for the old styles of machines are on the run
this year, and have been from the very start, and are making ludic
rous and desperate efforts to unload their ancient contrivances at any
price they can get. We have sold more Whiteley machines up to this
date than all of our competitors combined. The" only difficulty will
be to get enough of these already famous machines.
Studebakek Bros. .Manufacturing Co.
Bv A. T. Glass.
The WHITELEY BINDER
Is all steel—not an ounce of wood in the whole binder. Greatest
Binder Wonder ever produced. Does away with all
complicated parts. All we ask is to
OOME AND
these machines, and in your buying
BXJY THE BEST
Agents for the Tiger, Thomas and Bonanza
self-dump one and two-horse
~ HAY RAKES. -
Our stock is ever complete in HARDWARE.
Soliciting your attention and careful observanci
we remain, respectfully,
and consideration.
Babcock & Miles.
Mail Orters Receive Prompt Attention.
Frank White's
Billiard and Pool Parlor !
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT.
Elegant Bar and Fixtures.
and Cigars.
The Best brands of Liquor
Courteous Bar Attendants. Inviting
Club Rooms. Licensed Gambling.
Park Street,
Livingston, M. T.
JAMES CARROLL,
LIVERY, FEED AND SALE STABLE
Horses
Boarded
by the
Day or
Week.
Baled Hay
and Grain
always
oil h» BU
Fi*e Mm TanU ai Sitfa Hams tamaM Ike M. ft* it PbsihBi W
LIVINGSTON . ..... MONTANA.

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