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The Livingston enterprise. (Livingston, Mont.) 1883-1914, February 15, 1890, Image 2

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075261/1890-02-15/ed-1/seq-2/

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^ivinpton dntixytin.
GEO.
,
- - editor and Propnetc-r.
~ T ~~ 1 - 1 - -......-- ; ——
OFFICIAL PAPER OF PARK COUNTY
ana the city of Livin^ tou.
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1890.
Entered at the postoffire in Livingston, M. T.
as second-class mail matter.
-.---———-------——----
The senate committee on territories
has directed its chairman to report fa
vorably the bill for the admission of
Idaho as a state.
In the United States senate a bill has
been favorably reported appropriating
$150,0(XI for a public building at Hel
ena. This is the bill recently intro
duced by Senator Plumb of Kansas.
For the first time in the history of
Salt Lake City the liberals or anti
Mormons, carried the election held
there on Monday last. This result is a
greater victory than even the friends
of law and order anticipated, and in
the light of the recent decision of the
supreme court in the Idaho test oath
case, indicates an early dissolution of
this twinrelieof barbarism—polygamy.
The movement of the Castle people
in petitioning for a tri-weekly mail
service from this city should receive
the encouragement of our citizens, as
well as favorable action by the postof
fice department. Such a service would
be far more satisfactory than the pres
ent arrangement of sending the mail
from Townsend, from the fact that a
more direct, easier and shorter route
would be secured.
The members of the North Dakota
legislature evidently intend to be
avenged upon the Pullman car company
for its action in charging them $5 each
for sleeping car accommodations on a
recent junketing expedition. Repre
sentative Zimmer has introduced a bill
taxing sleeping car companies accord
ing to the population of the stations
along their route. The bill makes the
tax $10 per year per car for every town
with 1,000 or less population; $25 for
every town between 1,000and .'5,000, and
$50 for every town over 15,000.
We are in receipt of the brief and ar
gument of VV. A. lines and his Wash
ington associates in the case ol' Alexan
der Dellone vs. the Northern Pacific
Railroad company on appeal to the sec
retary of the interior from the commis
sioner of the general laDd office. The
document ably and forcibly presents
the claims of settlers upon the odd
numbered sections in the ceded Crow
reservation, and within the company's
land grant. The case will doubtless be
j of
j
i
and
for
taken to the supreme court for final ad
judication, and upon the result will ; to
hinge the title to many of the ranches
in this vicinity that have been settled j
upon and improved in good faith in the \
belief that the company's grant did not ble
attach to odd-numbered sections within
theceded Crow reservation. j
---------- i
The incorporation of the Montana | into
Mineral Railway company is a matter j
for congratulation, especially to the ■ from
miners of the New World district. The j ant
fact that the route indicated is the only j is,
practicable one to that camp is reason ; of
sufficient to believe that the road will !
be constructed as soon as a right of way zens
can be secured, or that portion of the j
Park to be traversed by such road seg- j
regated. There is no reason to believe !
that congress will continue to deprive j
that camp of railroad facilities simply who
on the ground that it would desecrate
the national pleasure ground. Even !
though aright of way through the j shops,
Park is opposed, there should be no op
position to a bill cutting oil from that
reserve a portion that is of no interest; M
to tourists, as it is barren of any ob- 1
jects that would attract the naturalist l iirs
or pleasure seeker.

[
Since the escape of Senator Becker
on Sunday and his successful exit from
the state, no legislation lias been enact
ed and probably no other business of
importance will be transacted during
the present session. The whole session
laws of the new state will therefore be
confined to the proceedings of Satur
day's work in the senate, which appears
in another column. Fortunately suffi
cient legislation was secured at that
session to avert threatened disasters,
such as the closing of the penitentiary
and other state institutions on account
of a failure to secure needed appropri
ations for their maintenance. These
bills passed by the senate and republi
can branch of the lower house will no
doubt be permitted to become laws,
through a failure of the governor to in
terpose his veto, and will certainly re
ceive the sanction of the highest judic
ial tribunal of the state. For this tiie
people must at least he thankful, and
for the lack of further needed legisla
tion place the responsibility where it
should rest—with the democratic mem
bers of the state senate.
[
The business of the state legislature
was again brought to a standstill
by the desertion of the democratic sen
ators, who are reported to be in St. Paul
and Spokane Falls. This action of the
democratic senators in violating their
oaths of office by leaving the senate
without a quorum at this time can be
for no other purpose than to prevent
urgently needed legislation, solely on
political grounds. It is an admission
that legislation enacted by the republi
can house and senate would receive the
sanction of the highest judicial tribunal.
Surely nothing less could have induced
these representatives of the people to
forsake their posts of duty and openly
violate the law and ignore their oaths
of office. By their oath they solemnly
pledged themselves to support, protect
and defend the constitution of the state
of Montana and discharge the duties of
their office with fidelity. This they
have clearly failed to do, and for such
failure the people of Montana will hold
them responsible. No political prestige
would have been sacrificed had they re
mained and permitted legislation to pro
ceed. The responsibility for any legis
lation would bave rested with the re
publicans, who were willing to assume
it, transact needed business and ad
journ. As the case now stands the
democratic senators are virtually fugi
tives from justice and no excuse can be
offered in extenuation of the course
they have pursued.
of
at
of
and
too
by
lars
and
Call
! A Washington special say. :
tary Window will in a few day- . >♦»
before the house committee ...
weights and measures and ex; . im v.
j he insists upon having in his sii
h ul l ion certificate bill the pp» i ÛOI. g
i i n g him power to suspend th
1890. ' ° f b,,lll, ' n at any time>
vise
T.
the measure h
j tacked during
Représentât iv<
pa
: is clause in
n very severely at
past 1< w days l>v
j has made the statement that should
j the bill become a law with this provis
fa- j ion siivor wili be degraded t->a common
of coinmer da! eommodit- and mini.:- i:i
symes of Colorado, who
has
of
a
of
terests practically ruined, as il will
make it easy for the secretary of the
treasury, for personal or publie reasons,
to stop the purchase of silver at any
time. Windom says it is positively
necessary to have this feature in the
bill because the bails and bears of the
great money centers of the world may
combine to push up the market or to
crowd it down for the purpose of get
ting a corner on silver and making the
l nited States government pay for it.
He says that with this power he can
stop any bear or bull movement at any
time." A bill that will permit the bulls
and bears of Wall street to speculate 1
with a currency of the United States,
with no other safeguard than tha : . as- !
su red In the option of the secretary of
the treasury, is not a measure that '
should meet witli the approval of the
people. The present coinage law has ,
demonstrated that every secretary
since its passage lias been antagonistic
to silver, as the coinage of that metal j
has been confined to the minimum j
amount authorized bylaw. With this
record before the country it will he <
slow to accept any silver legislati m
that will place the white metal at th -
mercy of any one man, especially shoe
that man must be a tool of Wail street
in order to secure his appointment.
l'rcss Gomment
Inter Mountain: The reasonable and
bill
the
for
and
ar
be
Inter Mountain: The reasonable and
thinking men of this state are already
of the opinion that the Northern Pa
cific is taking a hand in the legislative
fight. That corporation wants no iaws
passed at this session and the way to
prevent their passage was o furnish
special trains to the fleeing democratic
senators. That explains how Decker !
got away.
Anaconda standard: After a career
j of five months the Livingston Entek
bui.se ends its daily • ütion. .V news
j paper that mide: takes to go to press
i once every twenty-four hours is com
pelled to secure telegraphic franchises
and facilities that represent a liberal in
vestment at first cost aud large expense
for current charges. The Entickprisk
finds tiiis outlay not warranted by its
field, l'heowner of the tidy little daily
ad- that has been earning from Livingston
; to the Standard has the satisfaction of
knowing that while it was issuing its
j daily edition the Enterprise made a
\ showing that was thoroughly credita
ble to itself and to its owner,
# #
j Courier; Everything now-a-days that !
i doesn't happen to complacently drift I
| into the democratic channel, from the
j rejection of the fraudulent returns
■ from precinct ill to the recent import
j ant decision oi the state supreme court
j is, according to the editorial utterances
; of nearly ail our esteemed democratic
! exchanges, "a gross insult to the citi
zens of the state and is being con
j demned by a majority of the repubii
j cans." Buch expressions are beeomi:.
! decidedly chcstnutty in flavor, but we
j presume that our democratic'1 demis
who have never been justly accused of
carrying heavy invoices of originality
! should be permitted to run Jiterarv junk
j shops, if that is the height of their am
bition.
— ~ —♦--
M ashington special: The house eoni
1 on public lands and Indian af
l iirs l,ave P ;lss ed favorably on the bid
• introduced som • tim ; ago by 11 •pre
[ sentative Carter of Montana, providing
for the appointment of a commission to
negotiate with the Crow Indian.; for
the cession of one-half of their reserva
tion in Montana. Incidentally, this bill
is of interest to several well known
men in Minneapolis who have mining
interests in the vicinity. Among these
are Hon. R. 15. Langdon and E. J. Dav
enport. They have located a plant of
considerable proportions und have a
smelter and other fixtures thereat a
cost of about $75,(XX). The claim has
been made that the Indian lands
reached out to include a part of the
tract by which this company has filings.
They believe that the land is a part of
the public domain and subject to entry
under the usual mineral land laws. Mr.
Carter's hill provides for a survey of
the reservation boundaries under the
direction of the commission, which will
also have authority to negotiate with
the Crow Indians for the sale of half
the lands to the government. This ac
tion would settle all questions as to the
title to the mineral lands.
The Proposed Park C.iunty Court House.
Courier: It is reported that the prop
osition to bond Park county in tiie sum
of $53,000 for the purpose of buildin,
court house in Livingston was defeated
at the polis on Tuesday, the 4th inst. At
least, it may tako the official canvass to
détermine whether tho proposition was
approved or defeated. Tiie vote was
extremely light, which shows almost an
inexcusable lack of interest in the mat
ter.
Wo believe that under existing law
tho proposition cannot bo re-submitted
inside of one ^ear, and if so tho citizens
of Livingston should bestir themselves,
persuade the county commissioners to
increase the amount t,o $'50,000 or $50,
000, harmonize as far as possible all con
flicting elements, and then go in earn
estly and intelligently, with a fixed de
termination to carry the election.
Gallatin county had a similar struggle
and at last agreed on an indiscreet and
inadequate compromise, resulting in the
erection of a'public building altogether
too small and shamefully defective in
construction. Park county should profit
by our blunders. Sixty thousand dol
lars is not a cent too much to invest in a
oounty building, if it is intended to se
cure a respectable and permanent struc
ture—one that will furnish suitable ac
commodations for all the county officers
and a district court room worthy of the
Dame.
To
Full
the
com
David
Hard
The.
A. H. O'Neil à Co., at tiie Centennial,
have nothing but the beet of liquors.
Call and see them.
To
6
Prxss,
THE POETIC JAPANESE,
vise
in
at
l>v
)ae Who Never Forçât His Politeness or
Ilis Poetry.
Tue genial Japanese gentleman,
though he may pursue the humblest oc
cupation in a household, never forgets
bis politeness or his poetry, says the
San Francisco Chronicle. He may be
busily engaged in prosaic occupation in
the kitchen, hut his thoughts are al
ways of a poetic order. The innate sen
i:i
who \ timent which seems to bo inseparable
will
the
any
the
the
to
the
it.
1
!
of
'
,
j
j
<
-
from life in Japan comes out in the pe
culiar way that in America, or anywhere
where the Japanese is studying the
language, he always learns it from the
poets. Most other foreigners learn it
from the newspapers. The genial Jap
can flatter in the most delicate way.
There is a small household uptown who
have a Japanese servant who is perpet
ually putting puzzling questions, gener- j
ally on the meaning of poetry. He j
asked the lady of the house the other j
day before her married daughter what
this line from Popo meant:
"Beaux drive beaux away."
She explained that there were two
kinds of beaux. In the old days it
meant what we call a dude; hut that
when a young lady had several young
gentlemen hanging around her all the
time trying to make up their minds if
they had any serious intontions, they
were called beaux. The man who made
up his mind first or was most pleasing
to the girl got her and drove the others
away.
"Mr. - must have had a lot of
trouble driving the beaux away from
Mrs. -," tho polite Jap said, looking
at tho married daughter.
Tho married daughter told her mother
immediately after that she thought the
Jap was getting too little wages. But it
did not work. !
This Jap does not stop short of !
Shakespeare in his studies. She called •
!
him ono day and sent him across to the
fruit storo to get a five-dollar gold piece
changed. He came back with tho silver 1
all covered with fruit acid and feeling
very unpleasant, and she put it into the
basin to clean it. Ho w-atched her and
of course immediately wanted to know
what she did it for.
"It is so dirty and disagreeable to han
dle," she said.
"Oh, yes," said he, "I understand. It
has been slave to thousands."
READING HUMAN NATURE. !
Success of an Insurance Agent Who Has I
Mastered the Art.
Success in any line of business is al
most certain to the man who can quick
ly read tho dispositions and the peculiar
ideas of tho people with whom ho has to
deal. This is particularly truo of the
man who has to argue and reason his
victims into something they do not wish ; St.
to do. The case I have in mind is that „
Oi an insurance agent, Sa} T S tho Chicago
Journal's side-walk stroller. He repre- j
j
sen is only life and accident, and turns m .
more applications to hi3 office on LaSalle ■
Street than any Other agent in tho city.
In hlS rounds he keeps tab on the par- .
* ■ - ;
ties and their peculiarities, and when he
gets something that fits their cases he 1
gives them another going over. Among
* AX ta
others he had a list of some twenty gen- n,,.
tlemen, young and old, whom he re- j
garded as quite superstitious. Ho had
them marked. Ono day he got some- !
thing to fit their minds. He had tried
to write three young men in ono depart
ment in a wholesale grocery house. Two
of them took out policies, but the third
turned him off with a laugh and a sort
of sneer. The second day following the
daily papers contained an account of the
third young man falling over the balus
ters of a high stairway and receiving
fatal injuries. Another day and the an
nouncement of his death was published
in all tho papers. What did our smart
accident agent do? Ho took tho clip
pings from the papers, went to each one
of the superstitious men on his list, told
the story of how two were insured and
the third refused and met his death, and
at sundown of that day ho had tho ap
plications of eighteen out of the twenty
victims for either life or accident in
surance. He read his men.
L
S
the
en
of
to
TX
final
proof
the
-tana,
NE.
north
on
of
ESjÿrùS
mi
OKl
j
j
!
'
PHIL SHERIDAN CAMP
-NO. 6
SONS OF VETERANS
POWLEE'S HALL
Friday Eve'g, Fob. 21.
A N D
REMEMBER!
of
FOR THE LADIES!
$3 Hand Embroiderer
SEteT FREE
the
To every person subscribing to tbeWEVKiY Pio
neer 1'rkss for ono year ami sending ns $1.30.
Full directions go fieo with every machine.
1Y
STILL ANOTHER
'PROPOSITION !
We will send l'.-ee to every yearly subscriber to
the Wkeki.v Pn.NEiiB PBU3S, who will send us
$1.30, a set of the
WORKS OF
CHARLES DICKENS
la Twciye Largo Numbers.
The twelve numbers contain the following world
famous works, each one of which Is published
com rf,KTE, l;cuaxoi:o asd i^uLvrer; lxa
bridgud:
David Copperfieid, Oar Mutual Friend,
Mchoias Mckeiby, Ileiubry and >on,
Martin Cltuzzlewit, Pickwick Papers,
Bleak Reave, Little Borrit,
Hard Times and the Mystery of Edwin DrOOd,
Oliver Twist and Great Expect at inns,
Baruaby Budge sad Christmas Stories,
A Tslo of Two Cities,
The. OM Cariosity Shop and Tho Y'-'ammerclal
Traveler.
the
on
said
as
me
to
est
lode,
of
plete
said
I
ONCE MORE!
To every person who will smd tis 50 Cents for a
6 Months' t-ulwenpiion to the IVi'kkly Piohkeh
Prxss, vre will mail 4 REE a magnificent picture,
"The Horse Fair!"
By Rosa Bonheur, s'xo 27x34 inches.
These ere the greatest offen ever made by ny
Address
Die Weekly Pioneer Press,
fl7 v PAUL, MHUk
tana,
ter
Order
tate
ren
his
of
judge
the
1890,
the
of
cause
said
estate
And
teas!
lished
m*
or
oc
the
be
in
al
sen
Children
Cry for
PITCHER'S
worn
Health and Sleep without
Morphine.
"Castoria is so well adapted to children that
I recommend it as superior to any prescription
known to me." H. A. Abciier, M. I).
82 Porti nd '. ve., Brooklyn, N. Y.
"I use Castoria In my practice, and find it
specially adapted to ■■ {fi ctions of children "
Alex. Robertson, M. IJ.,
1057 Sd Ave., New York.
Tut Centaur Co., J82 Pulton St.. N. Y.
pe
the
the
it j
Jap j
!
who j
!
j
He j
j
it
if
of
it ,....... . ...........
! K'cctcd often lead to premntnrcold'fiffeniid i
of ! J&j « "mÄ* iÄ h °™ for,5 ' üü Sc '
• a wkittfn gi'Akantkk f,»reveryI -toc
Celebrate:] French Eure,
"io.-Üre" 1 ''ÂPHIÎGDJTINE" rci
M'
money
(.'funded.
Is Sour ON A
POSITIVE
GUARANTEE
! o on re a n y
form of lienons
or Hin
di" rdor of the
generative or
gans of cither
B ,,S8i ' sex whether a r
BEFORE isimj from the AFTER
c.\ci " n e use of stimulants, Tobacco or Opium,
or through youthful indiscretion, over ind'ilg
tnicc, Ac., such ns Loss of Brain Bower, Wakeful
ness Bearing down Bains in the Back', Seminal
\i eakness. Hysteria. Nervous Brost ration Noeturu
n
1 t ' ,,r
1,1 Emissions. I.euconlKea, Dizziness, WcuU Mem
ory. I.qssof Bower nml Iinpotcncy, wliieli if ne
usnn
Scnt bv
ooeior oi in : ce.
\ Wit
iriier. to refund the money jf a Pci-ni.-uieuC
•urc is not efleeted Thousands of testimonials
old and young, of both sexes, pcrimuienilv
In-Ai'iiRoniTiNK. Circular free. Address
THE APHFIO MEDICINE CO.
WESTERN lumvr n.
BOX 27 PORTLAND, OR
PETESSOW'S PHAHMACY,
Sole Agents, - Livingston, Montana.
THE
!
RUNS
nains with Pullman Vestilmled Drawing
I
'........ ....................
; St. Ball and Minnkatoi.is.
„ Kast ™ A,NS " V,' 1 Y«tibnieU Drawing
design, between Chicago and Milwaukee and
j ashlami and in-urr:!.
I hiough Bvliiiian \ ( Ftil.iueo Drawing Rgoiu
. and tv.Uni.-i steeit-r» ,ia the Northern i»a-iiiv
■ Railroad between C'uic- >uu and Portland, OilK.
Convenient trains to and from Eastern,
Room Sleepers, Dining ears and roaches of latest
leeign, between Chicago and HilwaI'KEE and
Western, Northern and Central Wisconsin points', I .
. affording unequalled service to from Waukesha, I
; Fond du Lac. Oshkosh, Neenab, Menasha, Chip- I—
Hurley, \\ ia., and iron
Mich.
a Kal]jJ E . in
1 wood and ù Vm-V
for t ck.-t si.-epinc car reservations, time
ta ides and I : in r 1 . mmation, an).lv to Agents if
n,,. line, or t„ u ... • ......... anywhere in the
j United sut .■* or Can ada,
f 'V î i S \i'* K ' iL c * B-tRLOW
! C " em ra " ,11
AsBt Gen f Pass, and Tat. Agt., Milwaukee, Wis.
Gen'l "i'rafiic Mgr
LOUIS ECKSTEIN,
Agt., Milwaukee,
[AOK SALE.—Twenty one Angora goats ami
L several fresh milch cow*. Adiiress
E. B. Yates, Vater, Mont.
S EALED
12 o'clock J
ROPUSALS will ho received up to
of Tuesday. Match 4, lH'O, at
f the county • ierk. for the cam, inain
d clothing of tiie county pour, for the
•or. at tiie poor farm. Direct proposals
Pi**rk, au 1 mark name "Bids for Care
1'oe commissioners reserve the right
i.v or ail Ii (is. S. DEUTSCH, "
Count.- Clerk and Recorder.
Livingston, February 1", is!*).
the office
tenance a
en- iiiu g v
of B
to re
net i
■^JOTICE FOE PUBLICATION.— Land Office
TX at Bozeman, .Montana, February 15, 189J.
Notiie is hereby given that the following named
settler has filed notice of his intention to make
final proof in support of his claim, and that said
proof will be made before the Jmlge of the Sixth
Judicial District Court, or in hi* absence before
the Clerk of said Court, at Livingston, Mon
-tana, on March 2Jtli, ISiJO, viz: William G.
stong, H. H. No. 8S7, for the W. of NE.
NE. -,i of NW. >j, and lot l of Sec. HO, Tp. 4 [
north of range 15 E He names the following
witnesses to prove Ilfs continuous residence up- I
on and cultivation of said land, viz: Edward K. j
Barker, Solomon F. Weatherman. James Medley,
Nathan D. T. Weatherman, all of Melville, Park
county, Montana.
E. F. FERRIS, Register.
(1st pub. Feb. 15, ISSXI.j
■jVTOTICE TO CO-OWNER—'To Louis Wildea
Ul or liis assigns: You arc hereby notified
that the undersigned. J. J. Cooper, has in ac
cordance with section ÄkU revised statutes of the I
j United i-.tates, expended :n labor and improve- |
j r.ients upon the Dixie <;uur!z lode mining claim,
! situated in the Boulder (unorganized, minim
' district, Bark county. .Montana, $100 to represent
said mining claim for the year 1FKS». That unless
you, as co-owner with me in said ■ laim, pay to
me your proportion of such expenditure accord
ing to your respective intern -t—one-half inter
est— $50, lies ides cost of advertising, within
ninety days after the complets publication of this
notice, your interest in said claim will become
tiie property of tho subscriber, under the pro
visions of said section -J3Z4 revised statutes of
the l nited States. Settlement to lie made at the
Entekpuise office. I J. COOPER.
(First pub. Feb. 15,1820.1
jVOTICE TO CO-OWNER.-To M. Smith or |
If liis assigns: A'ou are hereby notified that
tue undersigned, W. II. Le - and James Connell, I
have in accordance with section 2334 revised stat-1
utes of the United States, expended $200 in labor
and improvements upon a certain placer claim'
located by Smith and Fleishman Aprii 3, 1883 j
containing 3(25 feet, lying between the upper and
lower Cone place: ground, in Emigrant mining
district. Park county, Montana, and known as
the traction, to represent said placer minin"
claim for the years 1883 and 1889. That unless
you, as co-owner with.us in said claim, pay vour
proportion of saiu expenditure, viz , $10c», on
your one-half interest, besides the cost of the
publication of this notice, within ninety days
after the complete publication thereof, yonr in-'
tere3t in said claim will become the property of
the subscribers, under said section 2334 revised I
statutes of the United States.
W. H. LEE,
JAMES CONNELL.
(1st pub. Feb. 15.1889.)
N otice io co-owner. —To Columbus
Leary : You are hereby notified that the
undersigned, Robert Manderville and llenrv B.
Botter, have, in accordance with section 2334 re
vised statutes of the United States, expended
$200 in labor and improvements upon tiie Kala
mazoo quartz lode mining claim, situated in the
New World mining district, Park county, Mon
tana, to represent said claim for the years 1888
and 1889. That unless yon, as co-owner in said
ui.icoo juu, as wuniier lu BäKl
quartz iode mining claim, pay vour proportion
of said expenditure—$()6 ; f;(i-besides cost of pub
listing this notice, within ninety (lavs after the
complete publication thereof, yonr one-third in
terest in said claim will become the property of
the subscribers under said section 2324 revised
statutes of the United States. Settlement to be
made at the ExTzit;>i:i«£ office, Livinveton
ROBERT MANDER VILLE.
HENRY B. POTTSR.
(1st pub. Jan. -35, 1890.)
VTOTICE TO CO-OWNERS.—To Florence Mc
1Y Car thy, Patrick Smith and Martin O'Brien,
their heirs or as-igns: You are hereby notified
that the undersigned, John P. Connell, ba 3 in
accordance with section 2334 revised statutes of
the United States, expended in labor and im
state of Montana, one hnmired<$10j) dollars each
on said quartz lode mining claims, to represent
said claims for the year 1889. That unless you,
as co-owners with me in said mining claims, par
me yonr proportion of said expenses, according
to yonr respective interests, viz., Florence Mc
Carthy, one-third interest in the .Mammoth lode,
$38.33!«: Patrick Smith, one twenty-fourth inter
est in the Mammoth lode, $4.10 g. and Martin
O'Brien, one-fourth interest in the silver Wonder
lode, $25.00, besides the cost of the publication
of this notice, within ninety days after the com
plete publication thereof, yonr interests ia the
said claims will become nn prooerty under said
section 2321 of the laws of the United States
JOHN P. CONNELL.
Ba'ed February 3, 1890.
(1st pub. Feb. 15, 1390.)
I N THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE
SixtL Judicial District of the state of Mon
tana, in and for the county of Park. In the mat
ter of the estate of Francis Giosdorff, deceased.
Order to show cause why order of sale of real es
tate should not be mace. William H. Lep, the
executor of the estate and guardian of the child
ren of Francis Geisdorff, deceased, having filed
his petition herein praying for a i order of
'ddecc '
of the real estate of said decedent, for the purpose
there:» set forth. It is therefore ordered by the
judge of said court that all persons interested in
the estate of said deceased appear before the said
district court on Monday, the 7th day of April,
1890, at 10 o'clock in the forenoon of said dar, at
the court room of said district court, in the city
of Livingston, in the county of Park, to show
cause why an order should not be granted to the
said W illiam II. Lee to seU so much of the real
estate of the said deceased as shall be necessary.
And that a copy of this order be Dubltehed at
teas! four successive weeks in tne* Livingston
_ _ _ ________anapub
lished ia said Park county.
Enterprise, a weekly newspaper printed i
Dated February 8,1390.
(Sjgned,)
FRANK HENRY.
' Totui
■ f
Judge of the District Court
|lat pub. Feb. 15, UK)
m*
TOILET GOODS!
Of Every Description,
Y.
it
Consisting of Dressing Cases, Manicure Sets,
Work Boxes, Shaving Sets, Odor Cases,
Triplecate Mirrors, Hand Glasses,
Ladies Hand Bags, Focketbooks,
Toilet Articles, Meerschaum
Pipes and Sets.
In fact the largest line of Holiday, Wedding and Birth
day Presents in Eastern Montana. Give us a call and
satisfy yourselves.
Slocks, Games,
Albemarle Hotel,
and Children's Books.
M, A. FETEBSON.
Livingston, M. T.
Invoice of Embroideries
ait "the:
Cash Dry Goods House.
-Co)
We are now opening and getting reulv to display a Complete Assortment of Embroideries from
one of the Largest Importers in this Country. Our Embroideries this season are well
assorted and you can find near and tasty patterns, ranging in price from 5c.
to $5.00, comprising the Latest Novelties (in medium as well as
fine.i in Hemstitched, Tucked and Oriental, which
we will be pleased to have you look over. We have also re
ceived a full line of Muslin Underwear ami will spare no time or money
to make this Department one of our main attractions. We have all the Styles and
Prices ranging from twenty-five cents to $8. We will ask you to cal' aud inspect our goods.
-(o)
WINTER GOODS AT A GREAT REDUCTION.
-(o)
Onr Winter Goods are still being Closed out at Reduced Prices. We have a few more of those
famous $5.00 DRESS PATTERNS left, they sold rapidly and must have been a Bargain.
People are finding out that our System of Selling Goods for CASH is the best.
Ont of town orders promptly filled. Bring in your Eastern
Samples and Compare with Ours.
-(o>
. __
I f ET
I— iL_
CASH BEY GOODS HOUSE.
EiSENBERG, - LIVINGSTON
if
HEFFERLIN BROS
[
I
j
SSa.-fi
mm
(S3
I
|
in order to reduce our im
mense Stock of Goods we
will give Special Bargains in
all our lines.
HEFFERLIN BROS., - LIVINGSTON.
rs
on
the
in-'
of
I
I
B.
re
CENTENNIAL SALOON
A. H. O'NEIL & CO., Prop's
Ï
-(G)
J f-r^ I TV j Y Y r* y
1 He 1* lHest brands Of VV 111sklPS llSOfl fiA-Gr tlirv L.,,. «
| 1 n iiiBhlCO lIsLU OA (2F TllO Dill' U11Ü line
Imported Wines and Cigars a Specialty.
Miles Block, - Main Street.
DEALER IN
CHARLES EVERETT & CO.,
LER
IL,
COMMISSION MERCHANT.
PROPRIETOR OF
The Livingston Meat Market.
TVost Side Main Street.
LIVINGSTON HOTEL!
JACOB KBAUSS, Props.
The Only JFirst-Class $2.00 a Day
House in Lving'ston.
Rooms Hi
T.
A. L. BABCOCK.
A - vv - wile?
8 ^
Babceck &
Corne and set the laurest assortment of 1
O
Hardware \
Ever in the city.
«fair
: .17 v..
■ k r g n? • *
NSJfeH ; . É
IB ai m .
jH
"1V 1 •* . )'U
jfel
5> « *_ '
-=ft
'î* , i
- i
Removed to our new store room
where we are now prepared to ac.
commodate patrons.
BABCOCK & MILES.
THOMPSON BROS.
THREE GOOD REASONS
Why you should examine their stoc
Because they have the Newest Goods !
Because they have the Largest Stock!
Because they have the Lowest Prices! 1
i*îew Dress Coeds !
Ilenrif*'ae, Brocdch the. Tricots. Drips Ilarr.r.'p, Fancy 1
Buffalo Fianpeis, Jersey Flannels, Eider d.
e have UJ pieces of one kind, tin.* hi
town, for 12;; cents.
FI; m is. Clear f ake F'lanafh I
n Flannels, Cotton Flannels.
est bargain in
ftfew Dress Trimmings
Parisian Bands, Bilk and Jet Ornaments and Baspamentrie, black and colors.
Rotichmgs, Silk Scarfs and Silk Handkerchiefs.
Ribbons, l.sia
lew Underwear l
LadiCiv', Men*« «rd CliiJdicr/s- Fianrels, Mhfüii Ur.dorvear, Norm hi Wool Cndtnvear, Dont* I
ChcFud aim Seated l ndenvear, Knit and Flannel Ovcrthirfs,
Toboggan Caps, Hoods, Coi: biuation aud Jersey 8uits,
R diy Knit Shirts, Skirts .vjsd Shirtings,'
Woo! Hosiery. Wool and
Silk mitts.
f-ew Stock Cloaks!
mieeth' find Children 'p Wraps, Jersey Jcckete, Newmarkets, Flush Cloaks,
Cloaks, Chili.ren s Flush Cloaks, Large Lite of Fample JSiiawls. We have
double the stock in this line ever before shown in the city.
lew Stock Clothing !
a's, Youth's, Boys' and C hildren's Suits, Kilted Suite, Overcoats, Fur-Trimmed OveiccKI
L hinthiJia Coats arid \ t.-ts. Leather and ('aovas ('oats aod Veste, Slicker?
_ . California and North Scar Blankets and Ouilts.
>»e claim to be Headquarter* on tlie^e lines. All New Patterns and Style«,
'•Talk is cheap, but seeing is belle s ing.*'
Mew Stock Boots, Shoes and Rubber Gccds !
French Kid. Don cola, 1 chided Goat and Calf Shoes, Kid Slippers. Wn wnmf
i i It Shoes and Slippers, r.ew patterns this Fall. Men's French t
". Big stock nf Doip'l
t, ,. v, ** - ;—...... .... .uv,, d . irmn v alf, Kangaroo,
I.ocw bottom, Milwaukee Grain and miners' Shoes, An
immense line of Children's Fine A School Shoes. •
New Fine Shirts, all Linen Bosom
M 4 Yoke, and made oi best New Yc
niutlin. A Perfect Sliirt fer SI. i price
They are the best.
Calif na. Canned & Evaporated Fruits Ik Vegetate
are .'now in ar.d we piojcie to tell Ilian at Gr.oiM; Fiooit Fuats.
PILLSBUHY'S ßtZST FLOUR!
Guaranteed to be the Best F lour in the \A orid and made in a mill larger than any other two
in the L nited States. Our Stock of
GROCERIES !
rs complete in all lines, which, together with the new pack of canned
offer at the very closest margins.
■ are receiving,*
THOMPSON BROS.
READ THIS AD.
YOU WILL FIND IT OF GREAT VALUE.
Owing to tlie coiisiant increase in our business we
that oui j) lesen l location is getting too small tor tbf
amount of stock we carry. Our intentions are to separate
our Clothing Stock from our Wholesale Limior Depart'
meut, b} moving the first named into a new 1 >ui kling
winch shall be up to the times end a credit to our City.
viTcTAr®/ 0 " 111 P refei> t0 start with an EXTIK&
JN IL \V S I OCk. in order to so w e propose to close oßj
oui Entire Lines of Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hat*
Caps, Eoots and Shoes. Etc.,
-A.T ACT ejCOST.
To convince you of wlnit we assert it is necessary for
to give
assert it is necci
us a call.
you
A RARE OPPORTUNITY
For
you to obtain your Winter Supply oh Clothing»
Etc., at one half the cost of what you will - have to K
eEewhere nor will you be able to find such a complete and
e else in this eitv.
We <*■
Elegant assortment any w her______
peel you to call earl} and get the choice of the selection.
«. ORSCHEL & BRO.,
Tne Leading Clothiers of
Livingston and Miles City,
Monte»*
J. H. HARVAT,
WHOLESALE & RETAIL BUTCHER
Cash Paid for Hides and Felts.
ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO
•treet, - ■ X4vinf«ton>

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