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The Livingston enterprise. (Livingston, Mont.) 1883-1914, July 11, 1891, Image 2

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075261/1891-07-11/ed-1/seq-2/

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2Cînnq$ton ënîerprbt,
IIGHI, - - - Editor and Proprietor,
OFFICIAL PAPKR OF
.SATURDAY. JULY 11, 1891.
»ton, M T.
AitK coi >ta j
-
I he I* lathead Journal, published at
Demersulle by Houtz Ac Keplinger, is ..
Knt<*r**<l at the pnstofllce in Living
» ...rond rla»» mail matter.
the latest acquisition to Montana jour
nalism.
During the six months ending June
30th, 1.009 miles of railroad was built
in the United States, of which Montana
is creflited with 79 miles.
The I'hillipsbnrg Mail has been en
larged from a seven-column folio to a
six-column quarto, and shows other
evidences of prosperity. The Mail is a
credit to the town and its publishers
and merits the success its improved ap
pearance indicates. _
An extended canvass by the New
England Homestead shows the new
peoples' party is not endorsed bv the
farmers of New England and New
York. The sub-treasury bill and the
loaning of new issues of paper by the
government on land values are looked
upon as wild schemes.
The Rig Timber Pioneer has been en
larged from a live column folio to an
eight page paper. This evidence of
prosperity is creditable to the thriving
town in which the Pioneer is pub
lished and imlicat«*s that the effort of
Editor Hatch to furnish a live paper
are full appreciated.
The successful killing of the four
murderers in New York Tuesday dem
onstrates that electricity can be success
fully employed in cases of capital pun
ishment. The objections urged against
the innovation when Kemmier was ex
ecuted were avoided in this instance,
and hereafter there should be no delay
in meting out justice to murderers
through objections raised in the courts
against this method on account of un
necessary cruelty,
A postal card from the N. Ai: (I. Tay
lor company of Philadelphia, dated'
July 1st, the date upon which the in
creased tariff upon tin went into effect,
announces that "no advance in the
price of the genuine Taylor old style
rooting tin will be made." Thus an
other democratic statement that con
sumers are robbed by the tariff is re
futed by the direct testimony of the
manufacturers themselves.
t l
and
It
2L

b
told
does
!:l v
ter
Land Commissioner Carter's annual
report will show that the business ol
the general land office has been rapidly
pushed since he took bis place at the
head of the department last March.
During April, May and June 27,29* ag
ricultural patents have been issued.
Added to this are 778 mineral patents.
This shows an increase of many thou
sands for the same period over any pre
vious year. The annual report will
state that 2, (»18 mineral patents have
been issued during the last fiscal year.
The Hillings Gazette announces that
beginning August 1st, the Montana
Wool Journal, a monthly magazine de
vote«! to the interests of the (lockmas
ters of that section of the state, will lie
issued from the office of the Gazette.
Its prospectus says: "The first edition
we shall print 1,000 copies and increase
the circulation from time to time as the
demand justifies. All matters pertain
ing or ot interest to Montana sheep
men will be presented in our best form,
and we expect to have special articles
from old and experienced flockmasters
concerning practicable and profitable
sheep raising."
have
cans.
keep
umn
their
own
take
jority
ast
lead.
vents
labor
work
last
cvvt.,
wages.
and
cede
would
be
probably
ment
lesson
It is
w hat
of
in a
the
notes
ury.
a result
is that
to
of
impelled
paper
so
of
Somebody has told the Helena Jour
nal that the western terminus of the
Hurlington <fc Missouri railroad is
within four hundred miles of Helena,
and that paper at once jumps at. the
conclusion that its construction to that
city is inevitable. Railroads are usu
ally built through mountainous coun
tries with reference to traffic to be se
cured as well as natural water routes.
Hut it may be that the traffic to be sup
plied by Helena's new cracker factory
will prove sufficient to attract every
trunk line within a radius of four, or
even live hundred miles.
The special school election today for
the purpose of voting upon the propo
sition to bond the district in the sum
of «20,000 for additional school build
ings should bring out a good vote. If
the sentiment is strongly in favor ot
the bonds, as was indicated at the
former election, it will naturally assist
in placing the bonds advantageously to
have the proposition endorsed by a
large vote, and it is therefore desirable
that every voter give expression to his
views upon the matter by casting his
vote at today's election. The polls will
be open from 2 till 4 o'clock this after
noon in order that employes of the
shops may avail themselves of an op
portunity to vote without loss of time.
The Herald mildly criticises Gover
nor Toole for appointing a republican
as a member of the board of World's
Fair managers for Park county. We
see nothing in this that is inconsistent
with public policy or good judgment.
Evidently the governor Is of the opin
ion that a more competent official can
be secured from the republican ranks
than within his own party; or it mav
l>e that remembering the tact that to
republican votes he owes his present
position, he desires to reciprocate
Reciprocity is not the policy of the
democratic party, but Governor Toole
is a courteous gentleman and will not
permit himselt to be outdone in ameni
ties, even if his position is not strictly
in accordance with the views of hide
bound politicians. If the Herald had
confined its protest to the appointment
of a bolting democrat to the position of
state land examiner it would have our
sympathy, but the appointment of a
straight out republican for World's
Fair manager is commendable, and a
pleasing indication that Montana's pop
ular governor is experiencing a politi
cal change of heart. We congratulate
Mr. Joy upon his appointment and
Governor Toole upon the good judg
ment evidenced by his selection.
By request we publish in this issue a
call made for a meeting of the manu
facturers and producers of raw material
ir. Montana, to be held in Helena in
August next. The object as stated in
the call—the encouragement of manu
factories in the state—is a laudable one,
and if the proceedings are conducted
in a proper manner much good may re
sult from such a gathering. Manufac
turing industries are yet in their in
fancy in this state, a commonwealth
which offers superior natural advan
tages at several points for remunera
tive operation. And in this connection
ft is but proper to state that no locality
in Montana offers better natural ad
vantages for manufacturing enter
prises of every character than Living
ston. I Assessing unlimited water
power, which can be cheaply supplied
from the Yellowstone river, abundant
fuel—coal, coke and wood—ample
building materia] easy of access and
cheaply produced, this city should be
come not only the most important
smelting point, but the greatest manu
facturing center in the northwest. The
only requisite required is the necessary
capital to successfully utilize our nat
ural and unsurpassed advantages, and
to this end no legitimate effort should
lie spared by our public-spirited citi
zens. And if the Helena meeting of
fers any advantages for bringing these
resources to the attention of eastern
capitalists, the opportunity should not
lie neglected.
ly
at
he
in
the
sets
the
as
the
were
date
ure
an
his
a
and
2,
tent
"orts
ner
affairs
Proprietor,
commentiniï' iinnn iî^. D ^ ar i rec ? D ^^ * n
at .-«Dokarie^cave Hi!! 8,,, ® lter 8ituati °n
lief that Li'vmo-«tJrPassion t ? the •** j
est advantages of thegreat- j
tana for the srif>ee«ar..i POm ' Mon- !
large smelting plant f r '^P®J' a ^ ,on of a
M T.
coi >ta j dén !a| n ^if!!' ?. f 3 "* that admits
^ ./.kan« ilL.i 1 i°, thls statement the
in mr.lv ..^ lew ..^kes exception and |
iK.rtiLrUv Io., Cn V.» 1 «?? 1 l ^ ,e Standard !
* : I ... * « fva r ^ * r • . ^ a * the Standard
, ' l^lVin^Ston is thH
niant '"■S tan t a for 3 l3 ^e smelting
plant. J hat im true, and the fact does
at not _ JJJjP y may not be an
is .. v P 01 /^ for a plant. Spo
limited its referT^" —the Standard j
jour
June
built
Montana
en
to a
other
is a
publishers
ap
New
new
the
New
the
the
looked
en
to an
of
pub
of
paper
four
dem
pun
ex
delay
courts
un
Tay
dated'
in
effect,
the
style
an
con
re
the
soeakbitr'af „ r *; f ? r . e H ce to Montana in
howetpr th2 U L L,v l ngston - This much,
r, the Standard lately said re
it^vas^topkofi 16 » 1 * 11 ? P ,an * ; a t Spokane—
value SU 3t i a u. glIre far above its
from rân^^°° h f hl ? built '»des awa '
from railroad tracks, it is not a prosper
ous concern. We added that the min
M? Oak^h' n ,' S P? kane demanded of
t l 2\nt k uL o ie i b,H,din S °f a branch to
the smelter and we said that Mr. Oakes
to bni,d th e road if a
•r.2 Vh 6reSt Were guaranteed on its
lh( ?e we understood to be the
fÄn /«K not meet with a °y eontra
?} b T ,n the columns of our
esteemed Spokane contemporary. The
Review is satisfied that at Spokane can
nUÎmT'r 311 the nat,lral advantages
needed for successful smelter oper
ations. We trust that this hope
aml'tha'r v Y arra »ted bv the facts
and that the Standard's correspondence
from the Cœur d'Alenes took toodis
a v ' ew °f fhe Spokane field.
It that town has the railroads, the right
2L e ? , tb . e fhe charcoal ami other
r« l f lai i tes ' f bere sur eiy is no reason
MmiSi Ure ' s P° ka u p . except in man
b "" s f eIf ' and we infer that some man
', ver ? , f ? r wron 85 if half that is
told about the existing smelter plant is
^t a . n .y rate, the fact that all the
Standard said about Livingston is true,
does not in any way interfere with the
possibilities of Spokane. We said that
!:l v '^' to V S the best point for a sniel
ter n Montana—not necessarily in the
world.
ol
the
ag
pre
will
have
de
lie
the
Press Comment.
Inter Mountain: There is reason to
believe that the big democratic chiefs
have given up Montana to the republi
cans. It costs too much, they sav, to
keep this state in the (lemocratic'col
umn and they have about made up
their minds to let the people run their
own politics. Only some collossal mis
take on the part of the republican ma
jority will revive the democratic hopes.
* * *
Inter Mountain: The United States
ast year produced about 170,000 tons of
lead. Thanks to the tariff, which pre
vents tree competition with the peon
labor ot Mexico, where the miners
work for o0 cents a day, lead ranged
last year between «4.20 and «4.80 per
cvvt., at which price it is possible for
American mines to pay American
wages. \Y ith free lead from Mexico
and Spain, however, the price would re
cede to a point wherp American mines
would have to close or American wages
be reduced to the foreign level. This
proposition is so plain that even the
Anaconda Standard or Hutte Miner can
probably understand it,
cal
the
ing
out
full
Its
As
it
such
point
the
here,
tried
nie
apply
the
ports
tions
that,
have
the
charge
tion
Herald: The Farmers' Alliance move
ment is formidable enough to teach one
lesson when it is rightly interpreted.
It is largely actuated by a demand for
w hat its members would call "plenty
of money. " That demand may be met
in a perfectly conservative manner bv
the coinage of silver, or the issuance of
notes representing silver in the treas
ury. Hut if it is not met in this way,
a result that may be reasonably feared
is that in the desperate need of monev
to move the corps and keep the wheels
of industry in motion, congress will be
impelled to issue a large volume of
paper money representing nothing, and
so bring upon the country all the evils
of inflation. Free coinage would in
volve none or' these evils; it is a con
servative measure of finance.
an
were
order
The
port
war,
to
the
ment
the
he
was
next
ed to
east,
Island,
Miles
embrace
is
the
se
or
for
If
ot
to
a
Salt Lake Tribune; The silver law
of last summer provided that after the
first of July of this year, the coinage
should be limited to as much as may be
necessary to provide for the redemption
of the treasury notes." The New York
Herald's Washington correspondent
sends a long dispatch to his journal ex
plaining the situation. It seems that
of all the "treasury notes," that is, the
notes issued on the silver bullion which
has been bought under the new law,
hardly one has been returned to the
treasury for redemption; so on that
score there is no occasion for further
present coinage. It transpires, how
ever, that when congress passed the
legislation which provided for the tak
ing in of the trade dollar, the hill con
tained a clause which said the trade
dollars should be recoined "as soon as
practicable," and the Herald says the
mints will at once be turned to work
ing over these dollars, which amount to
5,087,796, and which will make «5,148,
281 when re-coined. One would think
that the fact that the mints have coin
ed «24,000,000 under the last law and is
sued treasury notes upon them, and
that hardly one of these has been re
turned for redemption, would be suf
ficient to make clear to the eastern
hankers, that either silver was good
money or that there was a mighty
scarcity of money in the hands of the
people. Had those notes been in the
vaults of the eastern hanks during the
weeks and months that Europe has
been draining the country of gold, sure
ly those notes would have been sent in
for redemption to swell the gold re
serves of the banks. But nothing of
the kind happened, which shows that
these notes are out among the people
at large. When we thmk of «24,000,
000 it seems like a mighty sum. When
we think that it does not amount to «2
each for the voters of the Republic
then we begin to realize how tremend
ous our nation is, and how vast should
he the volume of money in circulation
among our people to give to them the
tools with which to do their work.
Henry Villard has returned from Eu
rope. and is spending a few days at his
country place near New York city. The
understanding among the New York
brokers is that he has returned with
new capital, supported by German
financiers, to rehabilitate the North
American company, which was seri
ously impaired in the November panic
in Wall street. There is a general ex
pectation in Wall street that Mr. Vil
lard will soon authorize a statement of
the condition of the North American
company, showing that it possesses as
sets and prospects which make the
stock of more value than the popular
Wall street estimate.
Washington dispatch, 6th: Corre
spondence relative to the dismissal of
Bank Examiner Drew was made public
today. June 29, Comptroller Lacey
wrote to Drew calling his attention to
the fact that in his report of January 24
as to the condition of the Keystone
bank. Drew had omitted completely to
mention the indebtedness of the bank to
the clearing house of $544,851, for which
notes and bills amounting to $729,306
were pledged as security. Drew, under
date of June 30, responded that his fail
ure to mention this amount was clearly
an accident. He did not include it in
his regular report, intending to make it
a subject of special note. The corre
spondence also touches on other points
and ends with a letter to Drew from
Comptroller Lacey, under date of July
2, informing the examiner that so im
portant an omission after fifteen days'
examination of the bank is not- consis
tent w'lth the confidence which must be
reposed by the department in the re
"orts of examiners, and calling for
rew's resignation. Bank Examiner
Shepard of Pittsburg, and Bank Exami
ner Betts of Cincinnati, will conduct the
affairs of the Philadelphia office until
Drew's successor is appointed.
til
et
ley;
of
ed
ond
plea
on
M.
fees.
given

mg
and
of
9 *®
of
fffi?

in
a
1
r££
Itefen
^^ * n Washington dispatch 8th: A pri
°n ! vate cablegram received in Washing
•** j ton . yesterday, announce«! that l'resi- !
thegreat- j dent Clarkson, of the National Re-!
Mon- ! publican League would sail for home j
of a today. L pon his arrival in New York,
admits the National League will begin to boom
the all along the line. President ( larkson
and | has written a friend here that he pro
Standard ! posed to have every state thoroughly
organized before the cl«)se of the pres
»■ ÛO r Thnro i« an infprPcHntr l»if r\f
smelting
does
be an claimed mat ne nas muormeu a menu
Spo- that he proposed to place himself at the
j head of a Republican paper in Chi
ent year. There is an interesting bit of
inside gossip in connection with Presi
dent Clarkson's business future. It is
claime«] that he has unformed a friend
in
much,
re
its
awa '
min
of
to
Oakes
if a
its
the
our
The
can
oper
hope
facts
field.
right
man
man
is
is
the
the
that
the
cago Those that are intimate with
him here believe that he proposes to
it running before,the national campaign
of next year is fairly on.
to
to
up
of
Washington dispatch, 8th: Gov. J.
K. Toole of Montana is in Washington
to remain several days. He spent some
time in consultation'with Land Com
missioner Carter today over land mat
ters in which Montana is interested.
Ilis principal business with Mr. Carter
was to riml out when the 5 per cent due
his state from the sale of public lands
would be paid. He discovered that it
would be several weeks before any set
tlement could be made. It will be re
membered that a bill was passed by the
senate last session of congress provid
ing that the bonus should be paid the
newly admitted states. Governor Toole
refused to say much about the politi
cal situation in Montana. He said the
people were paying little attention to
politics at this time. He was conci
lient, however, that the campaign next
year would be exciting enough to be
interesting.
The secretary of the treasury has
authorized the acceptance of the offer of
the Chilian steamer Itata to pay $500 for
violation of our navigation laws in hav
ing cleared from San Diego, Cal., with
out the necessary permit. This is tin
full legal penalty for such an offense.
Its settlement has no bearing on the
other charges against the officers of this
vessel, to wit: Kidnapping a federal
officer and violating the neutrality law.
As to the first of these charges' kid
napping the marshal it is not believed
it will lie against an inanimate object,
such as a vessel, though evidence on that
point might still have a certain value in
support of the third charge violation of
the neutrality laws. It is understood
here, Jhowever, that tho actions so far
tried in the case of the Robert and Min
nie and that prepared against the Itata
apply only to the vessels. The attorney
general is without official information of
the trial, but accepting the published re
ports as accurate, believes that the ac
tions may still be brought against the
individual officers of the two vessels. So
that, although the officers of the Itata
have compromised their offense against
the navigation laws, they may still be
amenable to legal prosecution on the
charge of kidnapping, and also of viola
tion of the neutrality laws. •
, r r v
start a penny morning paper and have |
'* 1 —* ■ :
in
ter
be
but
he
fect,
of
and
was
form
time
men
have
re
mines
This
the
can
tion of the neutrality laws. •
one
for
met
bv
of
way,
be
of
and
evils
in
law
the
be
ex
the
the
as
to
New Military Arrangement.
Secretary Proctor on the 3rd signed
an order abolishing three great military
divisions of the United States. Tliete
were the Atlantic, Pacific and Missouri
commanded respectively by Generals
Howard, Ruger and Miles. By to-day's
order the departments remain intact.
The purpose is to make commanders re
port directly to Maj. Gen. Schofield,
commanding the army and secretary of
war, instead of, as heretofore, reporting
to their division commanders. One of
the features of the order is the assign
ment of Gen. Kantz to the command of
the department of the Columbia, which
he earnestly desired to command, as it
was there his first military service was
rendered, and where he w ished to retire
next year. Maj. Gen. Howard is assign
ed to command the department of the
east, with headquarters at Governor's
Island, New York harbor. Maj. Gen.
Miles is assigned to command the de
partment of the Missouri, which will
embrace the states of Michigan, Wis
consin, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri, Kan
sas anil Arkansas, and Oklahoma and
Indian territories, headquarters at Chi
cago. Brig. Gen. Brooks is assigned to
command the department of the Platte
with headquarters at Omaha, Neb., and
the state of Colorado will be added to
that department. Brig. Gen. Merritt is
assigned to command the department of
Dakota, with headquarters at St. Paul.
Brig. Gen. Stanley is assigned to com
mand the department of Texas, with
headquarters at San Antonio, Texas
Brig. Gen. Ruger is assigned to com
mand the department of California, with
headquarters at Los Angeles.
District Court.
The following cases have been dispos
ed of in the district court during the
past week:
Livingston National bank vs. Yellow
stone Mining and Smelting company.
Plaintiff dismisses action as settled.
Julius Gunderson vs. Henry Elling
son. Defendent given leave to file
amended demurrer.
^ Aylesworth & Van Tassel vs. Thomas
S. Carter, administrator, etc. Default
of defendant entered for want of an
swer.
Charles Tappan vs. Board of County
Commissioners of Park County. Jury
waived and case set for trial for Tues
day, July 7th, 1891.
The State of Montana vs. James
Smith. Defendant refused to disclose
his true name, and to the information
filed against him upon the charge of
burglary entered a plea of guilty. Re
manded to the custody of the sheriff un
til Friday to await sentence*
The State of Montana vs. Charles
_________
Smith. Defendant entered a nlen of
i i « . 1 I
not guilty to charge of burglary. M. D.
Kelly appointed to defend and case set
tor trial on the fourth dav of the npxt "k
remilnr term '
regular term. the
George W. B. Smith VS. Alice L. Smart c
et al. Default of defendant entered and 1
judgment for plaintiff for $555.60, and
$50 attorney's fees
S33.10.
The State of Montana vs. Charles
Murray; robbery. W. H. Poorman ap
pointed to defend. Plea of not guilty
entered and case set for trial on the
fourth day of the next regular term.
The State of Montana vs. John Con
ley; burglary in the first degree. Plea
of guilty entered and defendant remand
ed to the custody of the sheriff to await
sentence July 9th.
The State of Montana vs. Carles Kane;
robbery. E. C. Day appointed to de
fend. Defendant enters plea of not
guilty and trial of case tet for the sec
ond day of next regular term
The State of Montana vs. Matthew
Carton; robbery. Defendent entered
plea of not guilty and case set tor trial
on the second day of the next regular
term.
James S. Thompson et al vs. John W.
M. Tinling et al. Default of defendant
entered and judgment for plaintiff for
$2,008.45 and costs, and $200 attorneVs
fees.
The State of Montana vs. Mike Hogan.
Information filed for attempted jail
breaking. Defendant arraigned and
given until July 10th to plead.
t» T , he ^ ate of Montana vs. John A.
Packard. Information filed tor attempt
mg to break jail. Defendant arraigned
and given until July 10th to plead.
Aylsworth & Van Tassel vs. Thomas
"dmmistrator, etc. Default
of defendant entered tor want of an
9 *® r a " d tr »al by court, and findings tor
plaintiffs. Defendant declared trustee
of mining stock described in complaint
fffi? ° rdered to transfer same to p^ainU
° f Montana vs. Eugene
• « * ïntormation filed tor burglary
in hret degree. Defendant arraigned
a The V Stot Unt ;u Uly 10th to Plead
1 he State of Montana vs. Mike Hagen
r££ r "t tl f D tor assaulting keeper o?jail'.
Itefen Jnt arraigned and giVen until
loth in which to plead
Pachto/ va John A.
Packard. Information tiled for assault
.
.....-,---of
and costs taxed at I ?,
120
The
Stallion
take
Amounts
given
N. B.
will
pri- ing keeper of jail. Defendant arraigned
and given until July 10th to plead,
l'resi- ! The State of Montana vs. Matthew
Re-! Carton. Information tiled for attempt
home j ing to break jail. Defendant arraigned
York, and given until July 10th to plead.
boom
larkson
pro
pres
l»if r\f
menu
the
Chi
bit of
Presi
It is
friend
with
to
The State of Montana vs. Matthew
Carton. Information tiled for assault
ing keeper of jail. Defendant arraigned
and given until July 10th to plead.
Elect rocut ion at Sing Sing.
Tuesday morning, in the prison at
Sing Sing, New York, James J. Slocum,
Joseph Wood, Harris A. Smiler and
Sehihiok Jagiro were killed by electric
ity in conformity with the legal decree
in expatiation of the crimes they had
committed. Only the prison officials,
J.
some
Com
mat
Carter
due
lands
it
set
re
the
the
Toole
the
to
conci
next
be
has
of
for
tin
the
this
law.
that
in
of
far
of
re
ac
the
So
be
the
v wiM I vi/wta v/" 1 / iinx? |/i louii UlULliH^«
have | scientific experts and witnesses especi
: ally ßumiuone( j were present. The
armed guard and group of newspaper
men in the roadway were the only re
minders of the terrible scene to be en
acted.
At about 4:25 the engineer in the
dynamo house, Jto the north of the
prison, began firing up for more steam
with which to run the compound en
gine. Black smoke rolled from the tall
chimney , and very soon clouds of steam
showed that the engineer was ready at
any time to take his signal. In fact, by
4:40 the dynamo was runningata steady
pace, only waiting to be increase«! as the
signal came. It was run for several
minutes and then stopped, the test hav
ing evidently been satisfactory. In the
warden's house in the meantime all
shutters hail been closed, so the move
ments of those within coulil not be seen,
but there was a suspicious stillness
about the building that, coupled with
the whirring of the dynamos, made the
observers without all the more watch
ful.
The window blinds of the execution
room were closed tightly anil no view
could be obtained of the interior, but it
was known about 4:15 a. m. that break
fast had been served to the condemned
men in their cells and to the witnesses
in the warden's house.
Slocum, when awakened from his last
sleep, was offered food and then was in
structed to prepare for death. Soon af
ter he was led into the death chamber.
Here the witnesses gathered. Slocum
met death bravely. As nearly as could
be learned his death was quick and
painless. His bearing was that of fear,
but lie nerved himself to a point where
he seemed indifferent. He was strapped
firmly in the chair, and when all was
ready the signal was given which
launched him into eternity.
The working of the apparatus was per
fect, it is said. There was no repetition
of the frightful torture suffered by
Kemmier. The signal was given quickly.
When the unfortunate man was in the
chair the full current was turned on,
and in less time than it takes to tell it
Slocum was dead. 'The electric current
was turned on until the men of science
pronounced him dead. Then his lifeless
form was removed and the chair made
ready for the next victim. The entire
time consumed in executing the four
men was l:23b>. None of the autopsies
have yet taken place.
Children
Cry for
PITCHER'S
CASTOSU
Health and Sleep without
Morphine.
"Castorin is so well adapted to children thaï
I recommend it as superior to any prescription
known to me." H. A. Akciikr, M. I).
8a Portland \ve., Brooklyn, N. Y.
signed
military
Tliete
to-day's
intact.
re
of
of
of
which
as it
was
retire
the
Gen.
de
will
Wis
Kan
and
Chi
to
and
to
is
of
Paul.
com
with
com
with
the
file
an
of
"I i.8t> Castorin in my practice, and llnrl il
specially adapted to «flections of children " I
Alex. Robertson, M. I).,
1057 2d Ave., New York. I
rar oENTaur l'o., 182 Fulton St.. N. Y.
R.C. THOMAS,
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER.
Estimates Furnished on Application
-General Jobbing Promptly Attentied to.—
Shop on Front Street, north of tho Northern l*a
-cific passenger depot,
LIVINGSTON.
MONTANA
rilEAMS WITH WAGONS FOR SALE.—Five
A span of tlrst-class work horses and mules
with wagons and harness to match for freightin'
purposes for sale cheap. Enquire of or address
H. Gassert, Horr, Montana. 7-8-tf.
I
W ARRANTS GALLED,
na, July fith, 1881.
Livingston, Monta
, - Notice is hereby
given that the following numbered connti
warrants will he paid on presentation at mv
othce and interest will cease from this date as
follows:
General fund warrants: 1448, 1874. 1413 1417
1470, 141(1, 1469, 1402, 1465.
four fund warrants: 324.
F. W. WRIGHT, County Treasurer.
N otice of application to cut tim
HER.—In accordance with the provisions of,
section 8, rules and regulations prescribed by the
honorable secretary of the interior May 5th,'1891.
we, the undersigned, hereby give notice that at
the expiration of twenty-one days from the first
publication of this notice, we will maae written
of V? th ?. h o nor » ,, le secretary of the in
I terior for authority to cut and remove all flip
D. merchantable saw logs, pine, fur and spruce tim
.f °2 the following described public land tu
"k 11 ' '"''t 1 " unsurveyed land on Strickland creek
commencing at a point about three miles from
the Yellowstone river on said creek, then up said
c r? eli , fl ' e miles, embracing the timber on each
1 of c antl the drawB and
. . 7 ' - -----viiinxi OU COL 11
side of creek and the draws and gulches puttin«
into said creek, having therein three million feet
pine, fir and spruce timber. Said land is high
at I ?, n( * 1 roc * t y an< l unfit for agriculture, located in
Hark county, Montana. Turkey * Lowry.
Benj Urnerand Chas. E. Fisher
Will dispose of their entire band of hoi ses
comprising
120 head of Mares, Colts, one, two, three and four
year-old Fillies, Geldings and Broke
Horses at
PUBLIC AUCTION,
TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER.
The increase in this hand is the get of the
DENMARK PACINO STALLION,
PHINEAS,
THE NORMAN STALLION,
BLACK DIAMOND.
THE CLYDE STALLION,
LORD NELSON.
The Denmark Stallion Phineas and the Clyde
Stallion Lord Nelson will also lie sold. Sale to
take place at the
I a
I
WeitMsiar, Jut, is, use
CORRALS,
MELVILLE, MONT.,
AT 10 O'CLOCK, A. M.
Dinner will be served on the grounds.
TERMS: Amounts not exceeding $20 c«sh
Amounts exceeding $20, nine months time will lie
given on negotiable paper.
BURT MARSH, Auctioneer.
N. B. Should the weather prove stormy the sale
will be postponed until the next fair day
I light
F. H. HOUGH
Has the liest equipped Photograph Studio in the State and a lot of new Hack
grounds of the Latest and Best Quality. It w ill pay y° u to tome and
look over the work before getting your Photos elsewhere.
Also Residence and Town Views of any size.
Enlargements in Crayon, India Ink and Water Color. A fine collection of Park
Views alwavs on hand.
HOUGH,
The Photographer,
Miles Block,
Peterson, the Druggist !
Wholesale and Retail Dealer in
PURE DRUGS AND MEbiCINES.
Toilet Articles and Fancy Goods.
Smokers' Articles and Fishing Tackle.
\V«' would call your attention to our enormous stock of Holiday. Wedding and
Birthday Presents, consisting of everything givable, and our remarkably
low prices. We defy coin|)f tition. Orders from all parts of
the country promptly attended to. Come and sei
ns. We can do you good.
M. A. PETERSON,
Albemarle Hotel, Park Street. Livingston. Montana.
it
in
it
Do You Remember
Our immense stock of Summer Goods a few months ago? If so you can imagine
what we are doing at present. You know we never carry over any
goods if LOW PRICKS makes them move. We have got a
fine selection in Summer Fabries, such as
Lawns, Challies, Indias, Grenadines. India Linens, Flouncings,
AI.L AT UKDIT'K!) CRICKS.
Remember our warm season Is just commencing. Get your SHIRT-WAIST'S,
BLOUSES, WRAPS and VESTS. We show the greatest
line in Montana.
--WK ARK SOLK AliKNTS FOR T1IK--
GORDON DYE-BLACK HOSIERY.
T hey never Crock or Stain. Same in SILK
and LISLE GLOVES.
I
We show 25 Styles in Sateene and Silk Umbrellas.
----<o)---
ENTRUST YOUR MAIL ORDERS TO US FOR PROMPT' ATTENTION.
-(«)
!
j
I _ __ __
T.T!T! EISENBERG
I »X» IW Wi
THE CASH DRY GOODS HOUSE.
LIVINGSTON I
Mayne & Burdick,
The Leading Merchants !
Leaders in Low Prices,
Best Quality of Goods in Every Department.
Goods delivered free in any part of the City.
Ranch trade specially solicited. Heavy discounts quoted on large orders. Now
is the time to puichase your spring supplies. Give us a call.
- _ - LIVINGSTON, MONT.
MAIN STREET,
of,
S. M. WETZSTEIN.
-DEALER IN
PIJEE LIQUORS ONLY!
Traci© of Families
-DESIUING
LIQUORS for MEDICINAL PURPOSES
particularly solicited.
NELSON'S
Livery, Feed and Sale Stable,
Cor. MAIN and CLARK Sts
NOBBY RIGS AND STYLISH TURNOUTS.
OATS ANDBÄLED HAT
I a * agJKsiJSrg
CENTENNIAL SALOON !
A. H. O'NEIL & CO., Prop's.
--(o)
The Finest brands of Whiskies used over the bar and fine
Imported Wines and Cigars a Specialty.
Miles Block, - Main Street.
Wilkin Brothers,
Live Stock Dealers.
Buy and Sell Cattle; handle sheep on commission; will mak« .
light butcher hogs from Minnesota every λ days. «hipments of
Highest Cash Price Paid for Hides. Sheep Pelts and Furs
LIVINGSTON, - MONTANA
Hack
Park
and
fol/Ajllj
If
■Jlflll'
%
Jour money w.-tt Jo
Some people would rather have their pockets ,
than he victimized by excessive charges, and 1( '
surprised at it, for the pick-pocket risks his liberty
and must take the consequences if Iu happens to he eàuô|
No fair minded purchaser can object to paxino- ;i ^ .
which leaves for the seller a margin of moderate
but it is a very different matter when the buver is n|| îfc
upon to foot an exorbitant bill. \\ e are satisfied <»n 1 v wl,, 8
we completely satisfy our customers. We e,m make it
your interest to deal with us because our system of ( | (l j,'
business permits no extravagances and we eome elu M
cost every time. For very little above it we are now M .||j ||(i
Clidden Barb Wire, Bain Wagons.
Nails, Etc.
BABCOCK & MILE:
Miles Block, Livingston, Mont.
THOMPSON EPOS.
This spring' propose to show the best and m«>vt ( .„J
plete stock of goods ever seen in their store.
I Our Stock of DRY GOODS has been greatly increased and all the
found in the markets will be shown in season.
■si now
Our advance stock of Ginghams, Prints, Embroideries, White ( 1 « h>< to. Black (;, N
and Wash Goods of all kinds are now in for early spring sewing.
Wr invite comparison on our Superb Fast Black line
of Ladies, Misses and Children's Hosiery.
! Besides Dry Goods we carry complete lines in each of the following department!
of which we will have something to say in the near future:
j Furnishing Goods,
Ladies and Misses Shoes,
Men's Fine Shoes,
Men's gnd Boy's Clothin
Our Spring Stock of HATS has arrived and we can show the most stylish ass:
ment in town.
Our Stock of GROCERIES is complete and we offer Special Inducements for t
next Sixty days to Cash Buyers.
We buy from first hands äs far as |>ossil>le and are prepaired to mak
I guarantee the lowest |*>ssible prices at all times.
!
Reliable Goods!
Honest Prices
-(C)
THOMPSON BROS.,
GENERAL MERCHANT!
LIVINGSTON.
MONTANA.
PEOPLE'S MEAT MARKE
HARVEY & CO., Props.,
Dealers in Meats of all Kinds.
BEEF, MUTTON, VEAL AND POULTRY.
All Kinds of Country Produce,
BUTTER, EGGS, VEGETABLES, ET
Frei auf Salt Fist,. Bacon Hams and MM Meals a Specially.
CASH PAID FOR HIDES.
fnrnTJhffi 5 ? 11 4 Dd K l ve .ü 8 a trial and we wdl convince you that we can amftvat
furnish the best meats the market afford s at prices to meet any ami al l n.iMi»ip ,
E. GOUGHNOUR,
y II
DEALER IN
And all kinds of Building Material. Builders and Contractors
will please take notice that I am not in the contract business, but
will give them better figures than ever before, and my stuck will
be more complete than can be shown by any firm in Eastern
Montana. Good Goods at Moderate Prices is my motto.
Second Street, - Livingston. Moi
METZEL BEOTHEES,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN
Cattle and Dressed Meat!
Cash Daid for Hides and Pelts. .
ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED^
Matn Street, - - Ijiviugstoii,
am
- — - -----, investigating.
ED. L. HUNTLEY A CO., P. O. BOX 667. C
ISO LEFFEL
And Get MORE POWER and use LESS WA»
THEUFreL»mRWE'£r^
k.
fur
'
Sh
jwtobert
f«.v
Jock
f»e
ra
:
"y
1
! et
»hat
njury
corn
»hich
Extent
Earned,
iditio,
Itorey
?ne

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