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The Livingston enterprise. (Livingston, Mont.) 1883-1914, March 19, 1892, Image 2

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GEO. H. WRIGHT, - - - Editor and Proprietor.
OFFICIAL PAPER OF PARK ( OI
SA'i'l'H DAY. MARCH 10 1892.
Uritpri-it st th<* jiostoftlro in Livingatoo, M.
ms.-ci.nil i-lsat mail matter
KKPCRLirAN (11V fONVF.NTIOS
tril
I-*-.'
y republican lit»
«y. Mardi U*.th,
iiit-> tiall, in the < it;
pot*»- of nominating
marnliai ami
•I h.
•ntion will I"
at J o'dorli
of l.ivinJK
a raniliiW*- f>
itv . 1erl< huiI att
held
|, 111
ii. for
for
«ml totraiiaad andi other hnaineHe a» may prop
erlv collie before the convention. The delegate)
and alternate^ to the city conn ntion will
« tioeen hv the republicans of each ward on
unlay, March llith, Ih'cj, at a o clo. k |. in. I
follow I no ie the apportionment of delegate- from
the various ward", vi/.:
First Ward- Kl-ien delegatee and eleven
(•-mates.
Second Ward Kleien ileb-'.-ates and eleven
ternatee
Third Ward —Kleven delegates and eleven
ternates.
The place of holding the primaries I" as
low s :
First Ward School house,
second Ward—Hosford s ofliee.
Third Ward Kowlie's hall
It will be the dutv of primaries in each ward
nominate candidates for aldermen in their
spi cti\ e w arils.
First Ward—One alderman.
Second Ward One alderman.
Third Ward One alderman.
liv order of K. Ooia.iisot n,
IlKO. T. ( HA MUKUS,
.Ions O. Sax.
T. F. Sti iitevant,
( itv Central Conunittee.
Legist«
Tlit*
ishcd
intial numlier of the News, puh
at Great Falls by Oliver
Holmes, is received. It is a neatly
printed and ably edited six-column
eight-page paper, devoted to the inter
ests of Great Falls, is republican in pol
itics, ami judging from the patronage
receives will find a lucrative field in the
metropolis of northern Montana.*
Congressman Harter of Ohio, the
leader of the anti-silver democrats, has
addressed a letter to Senator Hill de
manding his position upon the silver
question. Hill, however, ignores the
demand of Harter, preferring to remain
non-committal. In this he simply cvi
dences the fact that lie is in line with
his party which is justly designated as
the party of negation.
The Entkkimunk desires to again urge
upon republican voters the necessity
attending the republican ward meetings
tonight for the purpose of placing candi
dates in nomination for the office of al
derman. and selecting delegates to the
city convention, one week from today
The place lor meeting in the first ward
iH at the school house, in the second
ward at Hosfords office, and in the third
ward at Fowlie's hall.
The Herald after working itself into a
frenzy over the Behring Sea fisheries
question, criticises the present adminis
tration for not promptly declaring war
and wiping the English government
from the face of the earth. The Herald
should give itself no uneasiness upon
this score. Republican administrations
which have successfully disposed of the
greatest civil war in the history of any
country a war inaugurated bv the dem
ocratic party will amply demonstrate
the ability to satisfactorily settle a
dispute with foreign powers.
The matter of registration, which will
for the first time be enforced at the com
ing city election, should receive the at
tention of every voter in Livingston.
The registration ofliee will be at the
rooms of the city council in the Miles
block, and will be open Monday morn
ing and continue open for the registra
tion of all legally qualified voters for ten
days. Let no one interested in the
economical management of the city's af
fairs fail to register before the evening
of March .'list, as they will be deprived
of tlu* right of franchise if their names
do not appear upon the registration
rolls.
The Herald says: "The republicans
are opposed to the consideration of the
silver question before the election, lie
cause if the matter is brought up and
they are put on record they will oppose
it, and if not on record they will do as
they have often done before, profess
friendship for the white metal and at
the same time contemplate its over
throw in favor of the gold bugs of the
east. ' If our esteemed contemporary
will take the trouble to consult the vote
by which the date for the consideration
of the Bland bill was fixed for the 22nd
of this month, it will discover that the
percentage of democratic members of
the house voting for that proposition
did not materially differ from the per
ce ntage of republican members voting
in the affirmative. But it is hardly rea
sonable to expect a paper whose entire
stock in trade consists of misrepresenta
tion and statements made w ithout a
shadow of foundation to be fair even in
attempting to discuss the silver question
and it will probably pursue the same
course it has followed in the past when
it has been convicted of falsehood—re
main discreetly silent. The fact is the
silver question is not a party issue, and
can in no sense be construed as such.
1 lie friends of silver coinage are coufined
to the producing and debtor classes of
the country, while the opponents of the
white metal belong to the creditor class,
and these elements will be found pretty
evenly divided among the ranks of both
political parties. Realizing the hopeless
position of the democratic party with
out the electoral vote of New York, which
is overwhelmingly an anti-silver state.
Cleveland, Hill, Gorman and all the
other democratic presidential possibili
ties have either openly avowed the cause
of the gold bugs or counseled postpone
ment of action upon the Bland bill un
til after the presidential election. And
the fact remains that notwithstanding
the overwhelming democratic majority
in the house the date for consideration
of the Bland bill would not have been
fixed without the assistance of republi
can votes. *
The latest news from Washington re
garding proposed legislation to ]>erinit
railroad construction to Cooke indicates
that notwithstanding the strong oppo
sition to railroads in the Park the pro
moters of the Montana Mineral railway
right of way franchise have secured a
hold upon the public lands committee
of the house that may enable them to
obtain a favorable report for their mer
cenary scheme. With the opposition to
granting any privileges to companies or
corporations to build railroads in the
National Pleaaure ground, as freely ex
pressed by leading members of both
branches of congress, it should become
Apparent to the franchise schemers» as it
T.
.a
tir
lx
h*
al
al
al
to
has to every other person conversant
with the situation, that a favorable com
mit tee re|»ort will lie the extent of con
cessions granted in this direction. The
franchise projxisition received favorable
consideration from the committee at the
last session of congress but notwith
standing this fact the objectionable fea
tures prevented its further advancement
. ft that time. With this franchise
scheme out of the way there is little rea
son to doubt that favorable action could
be be secured in the house, as it surely
; will in the senate, for the segregation
plan, and with these facts fully under
stood the promoters of the franchise
proposition can no longer assert friend
ship for Cooke City as the motive which
actuates them. By continuing their
tight in the face of protests from the
mine owners of Cooke they place them
selves in the unenviable light of advent
urers who desire to secure valuable con
! cessions solely for the purpose of dis
1 losing of them to the highest bidder,
; and forfeit all considerations to which
they otherwise would be entitled. In
! this connection we desire to reiterate
J what has frequently been stated, and
I that is that if the Montana Mineral rail
! way people are urging their proposition
j in good faith and are actuated solely by
j a desire to furnish Cooke City with rail
! transportation they have nothing
j t<> lwse b y abandoning their franchise
scheme and accepting the segregation
I plan. \\ ith the proposed change in the
Park boundary the Yellowstone route
would be open to any and all companies
desiring to engage in railroad construc
tion, and the Montana Mineral Railway
company could then as readily avail
itself of this route as if it pos
sessed the exclusive privilege demanded.
PARK PRIVILEGES.
1 he incorporators of the Yellowstone
Park association have prepared another
bill to take the place of that recentlv in
troduced by Senator Washburn of Min
nesota, which as outlined in the dis
patches sent from Washington removes
many of the objections urged against
the former measure, and so far as ap
pears upon its face is manifestly fair to
all parties concerned, as well as in the
interest of visitors to the National Park.
This bill, like the "Washburn bill, con
firms to the association all leases made
by the secretary of the interior to the
Yellowstone Park association. It re
duces the number of acres demanded for
each hotel from ten to live acres, and in
this particular is a decided improvement
over the former bill,'although even this
area may be considered too great in
some localities where land suitable for
building sites is so limited that even live
acres could be so selected as to control a
monopoly of several of the more promi
nent points of interest in the Park. It
also gives the association the right to
acquire sites, which may be canceled
with other parties, and provision is made
that in case leases which are granted to
other parties for hotels are not carried
out shall be canceled and the association
assume the leases. This provision is toi
broadly in favor of the association, as it
gives them a monopoly of all surren
dered leases, which properly should be
open to competition to any person or
company desiring to secure them. The
association is granted the right to build
and operate a steamboat on Yellowstone
lake, which provides for competition in
this department and will therefore be
acceptable to all. except possibly the
owners of the present franchise for o|>e
rating steamboats upon that body of
water. Another important provision
and one w hich is a decided improvement
existing conditions, is that the
owner of any lease on which a hotel has
been built and is being occupied for the
accomodation of visitors shall have the
right of transporting passengers through
the Park by stage coaches under sue!
ru'es and regulations as the secretary of
the interior may prescribe, and shall
also have the right to transport supplies
und materials for the hotel.
The disposition to limit leases to fif
teen years is opposed by the association,
which justly contends that the invest
ment for fifteen years in large hotel
properties would not enable them to get
their money back, and that provision
should be made to extend the lease in
case everything was carried on satisfac
tory; in fact; a part of the proposed sub
stitute bill is that in case the association
does not conduct its business in a satis
factory manner its leases shall be an
nulled for its hotel privileges.
This new bill in the modified form
should meet with little opjtosition, and
with a few minor amendments to still
farther remove it from the objections
urged against monopolies in the National
Pleasure Ground, will no doubt receive
congressional sanction.
I'rexs Comment.
National Bulletin: The action of
American iron and steel makers in ex
porting last year $27,714,843 of their
manufactures—or §3,000,000 more than
in 1890, and two and three-fourths as
much as twelve years ago calls for the
most severe condemnation from the free
trade pa]>er8. Strange, isn't it, that we
don't hear them veiling that the McKin
ley bill did it! Perhaps the chief reason
for their failure to call attention to it is
the fact that the McKinley bill really did
a large part of it.
. ***
Inter Mountain: It is understood
that Chairman B. F. White of the repub
lican state committee will issue the call
for a convention within the next few
days and that the apportionment of del
egates will be liberal. The Inter Moun
tain cares not for whom the Minneapolis
delegation shall be instructed or whether
it be instructed at all or not. The mam
thing is to have a big convention so that
its work may be to the greatest possible
extent represenative in character. The
people, not the politicians, rule the re
publican party, and they will insist that
no state or federal office holder be sent
to Minneapolis and also that only tried
and true republicans be put on guard.
***
American Economist: Even the stub
born free trade Britain is beginning to
acknowledge that a country of high
wages cannot compete without protec
tion with the cheaper labor of other
countries. The London Colliery Guar
dian of January 29, speaking of the
stagnation prevailing in the English
iron trade, remarks that "there can.be
no doubt that some of it is due to the
stealthily-nearing Belgian competitor."
It adds: "The real reason of the sever
ity of the competition is, of course, the
is
as
to
of
7 in in. com pen uon ia, of oouree, the
longer hours and lower pay of the Bed
1
!
j
!
gian as comparer! with the English iron
worker." Now. unless we have misun
derstood Cobdenism. it has always
taught at least American Cobdenism
has taught that lower w ages and longer
hours did not count as an element in
cheap production.
K«*i>ul>ll«-aii Club Meeting.
A sjx-cial meefing of the Livingston
Republican club was held at the court
room Wednesday evening. The meet
ing was called pursuant to an order of
the president of the club to appoint com
mittees on registration and make other
needed arrangements for the coming
municipal campaign. At 8:HO, when the
meeting was called to order, every seat
in the court room was taken. Many
were standing in the aisles, and proba
bly so large and enthusiastic body of
republicans were never called together
on so short a notice as that given for the
meeting Wednesday evening. After the
usual routine business the order of the
business for the evening was announced.
First on t he programme came the sjteech
of President Poorman, which was a mas
terly effort. He arraigned the demo
cratic party for its charges of extrava
gance made against the fifty-first con
gress and the rulings of its speaker,
Thomas B. Reed, and by comparison
showed that the expenditures of the fif
tieth congress, under control of the dem
ocrats, was subject to much stronger
censure for extravagance without the
advantages of beneficial legislation en
acted by the republican congress. He
also forcibly reminded his hearers that
the wisdom of Speaker Reed's rulings
had been amply demonstrated by the
crucial test of time and had received the
sanction of the highest judicial tribunal
of the country, thus leaving the demo
cratic party without just cause for criti
cism. He was followed by George Al
derson, H. J. Miller, W. Id. Niblock, F.
W. Wright, II. W. Bingham and others,
who made short addresses which elicited
hearty applause from the large audience
assembled.
After the speeches by members of the
club it was then moved and carried that
a special meeting be Held on Wednesday
evening, March 23rd, when County
Clerk Deutsch will address the mem
bers of the club upon one of the most
important topics of the time the pub
lie land question. It was then voted
that a grand mass meeting be held on
Saturday evening, April 3th, and that
Hon. Charles S. Hartman of Bozeman
and Senator O. F. Goddard of Yellow
stone county be invited to address the
citizens of Livingston upon that occa
sion. This meeting, closing the munici
pal campaign, will he of the utmost im
portance and every republican should
exert himself to he in attendance and
make it the grandest political demon
stration in the history of the city.
It was decided that the most expedi
ent measure for securing a full registra
lion of republican voters would he by
the appointment of a committee of six
members from each ward, and the fol
lowing persons were appointed to take
charge of registration.
Firt Ward H. W. Bingham, Charles
Sliustrom, J. A. Williams, George T.
Collins, Louis S. Lahm, Jerome Will
iams.
Second Ward John Skillin, J. J.
Berkey, George T. Young, D. A. McCaw,
Geo. T. Chambers, George Knight.
Third Ward- S. M. Nye, Jos. Moriar
ity, Thomas M. Kwindlehurst, W. M.
Niblock, Charles Gamier, Frank Sliep
herd.
Cook« Kailioad Lej*i»!ation.
The following extract from a letter re
ceived by J. C. Vilas from Alvin P. Vin
nedge, relating to the proposed bill per
mitting railroad construction to Cooke,
will be of interest to readers of the En
terprise:
"Senator Vest appeared before the
house committee on the 11th and occu
pied a little over one hour in giving a
history of his connection with the Park
and his attitude toward the Cooke prop
osition. He said that several years ago
some of his friends came to him and
said they wanted to build a railioad to
Cooke, and that the Yellowstone route
was the only feasible one. He said:
'All right, gentlemen; if it is necessary
to have a railroad to Cooke I will agree
to cut off that strip north of those riv
ers.' After some consultation they came
to him again and said: 'That is ex
actly what we don't want. We want a
franchise for railroad construction
through that strip; there would large
commercial value attach to such a priv
ilege and that is what we want.' Vest
replied: 'Thut settles it in so far as I
am concerned: I will have no more to do
with it.' He explained in detail why he
was opposed to railroad construction in
the Park and how this cut-off would
permit it to Cooke outside of the Park
boundaries. I think his talk had a good
effect: do not see how it could help it.
He is recognized authority in matters
pertaining to the Park. He forms this
solution of the problem, and I certainly
think his talk will bear good results.
Senator Sanders has made all other pub
lic business secondary to this Cooke
proposition. I have been in daily and
almost hourly communication with him,
and I am sure there is no business so
near his heart as the solution of this
vexed problem. The right of way peo
ple are claiming 9 of the 13 members of
the house committee. I think they
must count some doubtful ones. We
shall see. I can see no teason why we
should fail, and yet we may."
I'ublieittiuu Note».
The Overland Monthly for April is to
be unusually rich and varied in stories.
The following are announced: A Bit of
Forgotten Biography (conclusion of the
serial. Santa Barbara and Spanish Life)
by Quien; A Unique Ordeal (what a
young lady went through on Kearny St.,
S. F.) by Isaline Lamaison; On Black
Butte (an episode of danger and heroism
the hill country) by Chas. E. Brimble
com; Happenings in Old Calaveras (a
character story of mining days) by Wm.
Hutchinson; Th'Las' Furrer (a do
mestic tale of Oregon ) bv Ella Hi,
son.
liggin
The Ceuturv will take up the cam
paign for good roads. The Aoril number
to contain a suggestive article on "Our
Common Roads," by Isaac B. Potter, ed
itor of t iixxl Roads and a practical en
gineer. The author points out the
enormous lose to this country through
the present general condition of \meri
can roads, a loss which falls not onlv
upon the farmer, but upon city people
well, who are compelled to pay unnec
eosary prices for haying produce brought
them. An American consul in Franc«
reports that the road system of that
country (the most perfect system in the
world) "has been of greater value to the
country as a means of raising the value
lands than have the railways." In
France every market cart, with its broad
tire, « « road maker Mr. Potter's S
8 u *Sestion 8 for the
betterment of Americanroadaiurfit u
fully illustrated, ' and lt "
The Washington co r res j Minden ce of
The Minneapolis Journal is very su
perior. -Van." the chief of The Jou rnal's
Washington bureau, is conceded to l>e
the liest new sgatherer at the capitol
among the representatives of Northwest
ern papers.
The political center of the country for
the next campaign will lx* Minneapolis,
the republican national convention city.
The Minneapolis Journal, with more
than double the circulation of any Min
neapolis or St. Paul pajier, is the paper
for the political news.
Spring Styl*** for l.mlipn.
Our lady friends w ho wish to be prop
erly and fashionably dressed would do
w ell to glance over the monthly Fashion
Letter in "La Mode de Paris," "Album
des Modes" or "La Mode, ' the favorite
fashion journals. This letter is one of
the best on the subject with which it
deals, explaining particularly the styles
prevailing or coming in fashion. Ladies
would do well to patronize these journals,
which are not only reliable, but are now
considered the standards of fashion
wherever they are known. The practi
cal lesson on cutting given each month
in "Album des Modes" and La Mode de
Paris., is intended to explain fully how
to make the new styles as soon as they
appear. Failing to obtain these journals
from your news agent send for them di
rect to A. McDowell A- Co.. 4 West 14th
Street. New York.
Children
Cry for
PITCHER'S
(ASTHMA
Health and Sleep without
Morphine.
"Castorin is so well adapted to children that
I recommend it an superior to any prescription
known to me." H. -A Archer, M. 1).
82 Portland • ve., Brooklyn, N. Y.
"I t.se Castorin in my practic", and lind it
specially adapted to flections of children "
Alex. Robertson, M. I).,
1057 id Ave., New York.
Thf Jentaitr Co., 1S2 Fulton St , N. Y.
! THE KING
OF ALL
i GOUGH CURES;
DOCTOR
ACKER'S
ENGLISH
REMEDY
j Sold in England j
! for Is. l%d., and ;
j in America
S for 25 cents a bottle. :
j IT TASTES GOOD. \
a MHBVHHHüBmHiaaMHHMBnai *
Dr. Acker's Jiugusu l :.r\
Cure Sickness and Hoadach. I
Small, pleasaid« «favorite with 1 ••*. ■
W. H. HOOKF.'Vic <'<>.. NEW YORK. •
25c. 50c. j
75c.
$1.00 $1.25
$1.50
m
«BONE IS ÖH v
FEATHERBOXE is made from QUILL8
nature's own tough**«' material, best whips made for
the price. Cheap, Durable, A1,L STYI ES all
prices, «sk jour dealer fur a - DC A TiirDDAUD
3To:r, szkx.?? -cry- rMl Mbit BUM.
Ceo. T. Chambers Sl Co.
FLOWERS.
AM lovers of Flow*
ers are requested to
send for a hand«
s o m e llius trated
Catalogue of Plants
and Flowers to
J. L Russell,
----THE----
BROADWAY FLORIST
DENVER, GOLO.
THE NEWWEBSTER
WEBSTER'S
INTERNATIONAL
DICTIONARY
Re-edited and Reset from Cover to Cover.
FULLY ABREAST OF THE TIMES.
A GRAND INVESTMENT
for every Family and School.
The Authentic Webster's Unabridged
Dictionary, comprising issues of 18C4,
'79, and '84, (all still copyrighted) has
been thoroughly revised and enlarged,
under the supervision of Noah Porter,
D.D., LL. D., of Tale University, and as
a distinguishing title, bears the name
WEBSTER'S
International Dictionai
. — ---------arv.
The work of revision occupied c
------------ «h
ing
•300,000 expended
ten years, more than a hundred edito
rial laborers being employed, and over
before the first
copy was printed.
•OLD BY ALL BOOKSELLERS.
Pamphl et sent free by th e publishers.
Caution is needed ia purchasing a dic
tionary, as photographic reprints of an obso
lete and comparatively worthless edition of
Webster are being marketed under various
names and often hv misrepresentation.
, GET THE BEST,
The International, which bears imprint of
G* • C. MEKUÏA _.r ,1 CO., Publishers,
Springfield, Mass., U. S. A.
LIVINGSTON
ASSAY
9—
OFFICE.
and Stiver.. $1 50 Silver........... $1 00
Lead............. l 00 Copper,........ 2 00
Qualitative Analysis.............$ 5 00 to $15 00
Quantitativ* Analysis............ 10 00 to, 25 00
For complete price list, address
Harvey L. Glenn,
Livingston, Montana
LOWER MAIN STREET
FEED CORRAL,
BILLY MILES & BRO.
proprietors.
BALED HAY. CHOP KBBD, WHEAT and
OATS forsatej-^th^pimndor
CAR
_ __egi
Prices ßessonsbte
Mil, Birthday ail liai Presents
IN ENDLESS VARIETY.
MANICURE, INFANT AND SHAVING SETS. TRAVELING CASES.
WORK BOXES. WRITING CASES. CUFF AND COLLAR
BOXES. PICTURE FRAMES. MEERSCHAUM AND
BRIAR PIPES
and a Hundred other Novelties in Fancy and Art Goods.
Having bought from Manufacturers direct 1 can and will undersell any East
ern Catalogue House. Call and see for yourself. These Gtxxls Must Go.
Peterson, The Druggist,
ALBEMARLE BLOCK, - LIVINGSTON.
Positively the Last
We have twenty eight NEWMARKETS and WINTER COATS
<m hand which must be SOLD or PACKED away. We prefer
to sail them. Now it is for you to say. If you want to make an
investment for the future you can save 50 per cent. Their values,
$8.00, SI 0.00. $12.00, $15.00, $20.00. $25.00,
ARE CUT SQUARE IN TWO.
Vow can select any garment in this lot at one-half the
price.
regular
This is without doubt the greatest Bargain Sale ever
iffered in the citv. Plush Coats are included in this sale.
110 VOL MOW
That this is a grand time to do your Spring and Summer
sewing. Compare the hot. sultry season for you to try and
sew, to a comfortable, warm room on a cool day. You may say, very true, but it is
too early; spring styles are not out. All we ask of you is send for samples. We
know your wants, in our line, and are always oil the alert to see that they are pro
vided for. We opened a beautiful line of Outings, Crêpons, Flanneletts, Bedford
Cords and Henriettas in wash fabrics. Also a fine selection in French Ginghams,
Scotch Cheviots, Satteens, India Linens, Lawns, Etc.
1)0 YOU WANT
To see Novelties in Spring Suitings? If so, call on us. We
are prepared to show all that is new and suitable for this
country. At the same time LOOK OUT for our display. When our new room is
completed our store will be again as large as our present quarters; our stock more
complete than ever; facilities to serve you to your and our satisfaction. Our
buyer is in market at present; you may look for a grand disjilay in due season.
LEE EISENBERG'S
Cash Dry Goods House.
Livingston, Montana.
Mayne & Burdick,
The Leading Merchants !
Leaders in Low Prices,
Best Quality of Goods in Every Department.
Goods delivered free in any part of the City.
Ranch trade specially solicited. Heavy discounts quoted on large orders,
is the time to puichase your spring supplies. Give us a call.
Now
MAIN STREET,
LIVINGSTON, MONT.
M. WETZSTEIN.
-DEALER IN
PURE LIQUORS ONLY!
Trade of Families
-desiring--
LIQUORS for MEDICINAL PURPOSES
PARTICULARLY SOLICITED.
PARKS & GILBOY,
DEALERS IN
and Fancy Groceries
FRUITS, CANDIES, CIGARS AND TOBACCO.
We would like to call your attention to the fact that we make a specialty of
GROCERIES of the best grade to be had in the market. We carry
the most complete line of Fancy Groceries in the city.
We receive weekly consignments of the
Celebrated
GILT EDGE CREAMERY BUTTER
Our TEAS and COFFEES need but a trial to convince you
quality. We handle the celebrated
of their superior
DIAMOND BRAND FLOUR
THE CARVER BUILDING,
COR. PARK AND MAIN STS.,
LIVINGSTON. MONT.
1
G. ATKINSON,
Glassware,
UkH
Furnishing
«15
Muin
"VUMMdg,
Rnh
ever
i88q.
Spring
Announcement«
We are now receiving from the best and most reliable Manufac
tiers of the United States the largest and most complet
ever liefere offered by us.
We call attention of the trade to the largest sti
RoundJstapleand Fancy Groceries
The best, most complete and stylish stock of
Dry Goods and Notions.
The LARGEST STOCK
T
.f FOOT WEAR t
lie BEST STOCK of
.f all
nptioii
Men's Furnishings, Hats, Shirts and Underwear
The most cofi i.AK stock of
Men's and Children's Clothing
Ö V
and especially to our great leader tl
KING "PERFECT FITTING" PANTS.
To our com i
I. ETE I.l.VE of TRUNKS
The most stylish
• Ni) VA RISKS.
Millinery Department
:astekn Montana.
In all of which we are now prepared for business am
ducements sujierior to others. Price list of groceries am
application.
d can and will offer in
1 samples furnished upon
THOMPSON BROS.,
LIVINGSTON,
MONTANA.
MARSHALL & NELSON'S
Livery Feed and Sale Ffablt
Cok. MAIN AND CLARK Sts.
NOBBY RIGS AND STYLISH TURNOUTS.
OATS AND BALED HAT
For Sale at the Lowest Market Prices. Horses, Mules ami W-icn- Ituiiglit and Sold.
Special attention paid to tourists ami travelers who wish to lie conveyed to or from any poii
safety and despatch.
BF FAIR WITH YOURSELF AND SEE OUR
SPRING STOCK
It represents an opportunity for Economical Having thut nobodv on
look. Our store is crowded with the Newest ot New Styles, selected •
care as to Quality and Good Taste, as ,\ell as to Sty le and Variety . It i
i afford to me
k it Ii experience
the
Right Place to get the Right Goods at Right Prices,
Popular * tyles, I.ate Novelties, Standard (trades and Ne
found in abundance in every department of our elegant line of
sl Attractions are all
MEN'S AND BOYS' CLOTHING. .HATS, CAPS, CENT'S FURNISHIN
GOODS, BOOTS, SHOES, TRUNKS, VALISES, ElC. OUR
MERCHANT TAILORING DEPARTMENT
K complete; a tine line of Foreign and Domestic (lo.xls to select from
HENRY
MAIN STREET,
FRANK,
LIVINGSTON.
PEOPLE'S MEAT MAEKET,
HARVEY & CO., Props.,
Dealers in Meats of all Kinds.
BEEF, MUTTON, VEIL HND FOI»
All Kinds of Country Produce,
BUTTER, EGGS, VEGETABLES, ETC.
M aud Salt Fish, Bacon Hams and Mind Heals a Special!?.
CASH PAID FOR HIDES.
Please call and give us a trial and we will convince you that we can
turnish the best meats the market affords at prices to meet any and all comi ie "J
CENTENNIAL SALOON!
A. H. O'NEIL & CO., Prop's
—(o>
1 lie Finest brands of Whiskies used over 1 1 1
aim
tint'
Imported VV ines and Cifïars a S
peei
i!tv.
Miles Block,
Main
StrefiL
OLDEST, YET NEW,
fS THE HARDWARE HOUSE OF
A. W. Miles Hardware A.
Successors to BABCOCK & MI
Agentfifor the beet goods to be had such as Bain and Mitchell
row n and McCormick Mowers and Binders, Charter Oak.
Castle, Garland Stoves and Ranges. ^ f's r! j
Rnh tilo/h, «V e8 * hand made Harness and Harness Extras. jmi
ever ™ °° ver8 ' P^ts, Oils, Glass, Etc. Our stock* ^
Dronmt attend Plumbing and tin shop in connection. Mail
prompt attention. You will find us ever yours,
VfTrc , 0 , A. W. MILES HABDW*
MILES BLOCK, LlVINpSTDN, MONT.

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