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The Wolf Point herald. (Wolf Point, Mont.) 1913-1940, January 01, 1920, Image 6

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THE WOLF POINT HERALD
(Incorporated)
A HOME PAPER PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY
AT WOLF POINT, ROOSEVELT COUNTY, MONTANA
Ea
«s
C. L. MARSHALL
Editor and Manager
OFFICIAL PAPER OF THE CITY OF WOLF POINT
ii
Entered as second-class matter April 9, 1913, at the post office at Wolf
Point, Montana, under the Act of March 3, 1897.
ON NEW YEAR RESOLUTIONS
Every first of January that we ar
rive at is an imaginary milestone on!
the turnpike track of human life; at
once a resting place for thought and
meditation, and a starting point for
fresh exertion in the performance of
our journey. The man who does not
at least propose to himself to be bet
ter this year than he was last, must
be either very good or very bad, in
deed! And only to propose to be bet
tr is something; if nothing else it is
an acknowledgement of our need to
be so, which is the first step towards
amendment. But, in fact, to propose
to oneself to do well, is in some sort
to do well, positively, for there is no
such thing as a stationary point in
human endeavors; he who is not
worse today than he was yesterday,
is better; and he who is not better,
is worse.—Charles Lamb.
Pu.
•.
A FISH STORY
(Chicago Herald and Examiner.)
Put one hundred men on an is
land where fish is a staple article of
sustenance. Twenty-five of the men
catch fish,
clean the fish,
the fish.
and vegetables. The entire company
eats what thus is gathered and pre
pared.
So long as everybody works,
there is plenty. All hands are happy
Ten of the allotted fish catchers
stop catching fish.
Ten more dry and hide part of
the fish they catch.
Five continue to catch fish, but
work only part of the day at it.
Fewer fish go into the commun
ity kitchen.
But the same number of men in
sist upon having the same amount
of fish to eat as they had before.
The fifty men who formerly
cleaned and cooked the fish have
less to do owing to the undersupply
of fish. But they continue to de
mand food.
Gradually greater burdens are
laid upon the fruit and vegetable
hunters. These insist upon a larger
share of fish in return for their
Twenty-five others
Twenty-five cook
Twenty-five hunt fruit
vegetables. It is denied them and
soon twenty of the twenty-five quit
gathering fruit and vegetables.
But the entire one hundred men
continue to insist upon their right
to eat.
The daily food supply gradually
shrinks. The man with two fish de
mands three bananas in exchange
for one of them. The man with two
bananas refuses to part with one for
fewer than three fish.
Finally the ten men remaining at
work quit in disgust. Everybody
continues to eat. The hidden fish
are brought to light and consumed,
Comes a day when there is no food
of any kind. Everybody on the isl
and blames everybody else.
What would seem to be the solu
tion? Exactly! We thought you
would guess it.
For we repeat that you can't eat,
buy, sell, steal, give away, hoard,
wear, use, play with or gamble with
WHAT ISN'T.
m n
The second issue of the Great
Falls Call has come to our exchange
table. It is an independent weekly
published by the Flint Newspaper
syndicate, with P. R. Flint editor
and H. S. Flint business manager.
It looks like a winner with 12 seven
column pages carrying a full per
centage of advertising and an abun
dance of news and editorial matter,
all well gotten up and well px-inted.
m
Christmas Program at Presbyterian Church
.School
Superintendent
...Pastor
Charles Hanson
.Emma Kreider, Adelaide Hanson,
Ruth and Ima Herman, Nora Hanson
.Frances Kramer, Doris Everett
Audrey Johnston, Velma Sti-achan, Enid Everett, Thelma Anderson
7. Song—"Santa Claus' Land" .
8. Recitation—"Christmas"
Addi'ess— .
10. Recitation— .
11. Song— .
12. Cornet Solo— .
13. Recitation—"Santa Claus
14. Recitation—"
15. Recitation—
16. Song—"The Message of the Starlight"—Tolf
1. Song—"Joy to the World"..
2. Scripture .
3. Prayer ..
4. Recitation—"Merry Christmas to All"
5. Song—"Once Upon a Time
Exercise—"What Was It?"
6 .
.... Primary Grade
. John Williams
. Ireqe Hanson
. Belle Everett
. Henry Cummings
... Harold Shipman
Wallace McDonald
Abner Kirk
.. Arthur Gulhaug
Christmas Days
Lila Kreider, Helen
Carr, Esther Mowatt, Frances Kramer
... Ima Herman
.. Viola Kreider
Lawrence Kleve
". Cleo Flint, Willis Anna Tyson,
. Helen Fox, Helen Anderson
.. Adelaide Hanson
— Nox-a Solberg, Madaline Strachan,
.Irene Carpenter, Mayrette Hanson
. Dean Herman
. Charles Rathert
Dorothy Solberg, Elizabeth CaiTxenter
Three Primary Girls
. Hazel Carpenter
. Senior Girls
17. Recitation—
18. Recitation—"What I Want for Christmas"
19. Recitation—"The Best Thank of All
20. Song—"Sleep, Thou Infant King
21. Recitation .
22. Exercise—"Christmas Bells"
23. Recitation— .
24. Address—"Syrian Child" .
25. Recitation— .
26. Song— .
27. Recitation—"The Message of the Star" .
28. Song—"Shout the Glad News" .
29. Offering for Armenian and Syrian Babies.
30. Real Santa.
31. Benediction,
1 Don't forget to turn over a new
j leaf. There may be a picture of
beautiful movie actress on the page
following,
MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR
nnnTiirn
ßROlHER VAN
u
A service of more than usual in
terest was that held on Sunday eve
ning at the M. E. church, in memory
of Rev. W. W. Van Orsdel, D. D.,
Superintendent of the Milk River
District, who passed away Dec. 19
at the Deaconess Hospital at Great
Falls. There is no question that he
was the best known and best loved
man in the state of Montana. He
was best known as "Brother Van,"
and by that term he was familiarly
and lovingly hailed wherever he
went.
Judge Gordon was unable to be
present, but sent in writing a fine
tribute to the man that he knew so
well. He first met "Brother Van"
back in '88, when he was in the
prime of his strength and vigor. Mr.
H. A. Schoening spoke of "Brother
Van" as a character builder and of
the profound influence that his life
and example had upon the world and
lives about him. The pastor also
spoke briefly of his work as a min
ister and missionary and told many
incidents of his interesting and
eventful career. The songs used
those "Brother Van" loved so well,
"Faith of Our Fathers," "The
Church in the Wildwood," and "The
Sweet Bye and Bye."
We never know how much such a
life means to us until he is taken
away. He will be missed by the en
tire church at large and also in the
smaller communities where his com
the Gospel. Tell them I died at my
post. Tell them all that I love them
with all my heart.' He will always
ing was alway a blessing and a bene
diction. He left as his message to
the people, "Tell them to hold on to
God," and to his brethern in the
ministry, "Tell them to be faithful,
full of the Holy Ghost, and preach
live in the memory of those who
knew him.
-
SENATOR PROMISES HELP
In a letter to C. F. Blaich, Sen
ator H. L. Myers says he will do
everything possible to bring about
the adoption, by the United States
Land Office, of Mr. Blaich's plan to
expedite the process of giving reser
vation settlers title to their land and
I thus enable them to make govern
j ment loans in time to purchase seed
! and spring supplies,
! Mr. Blaich's plan is to have the
general land office send the patents
of settlers who have proved up, to
the Glasgow office where the home
The senator is not at all sure what
can be done about the scheme but
steader could apply for a federal
loan to complete the payments on
the land and have a balance left to
purchase seed and other necessities.
promises to take the matter up in
earnest with the land commissioner.
j Division Bulletin of the Red Cross
j magazine contains a picture of Miss
! Louise Kellogg of Minneapolis, who
RED CROSS NURSE KNOWN
A recent number of the Northeim
recently returned from seiwice in
France and who is now in Montana
instructing classes in home hygiene
and home nursing. Miss Kellogg is
a sister of Mrs. D. K. Moore of the
Southside and has visited here.
)
NOT AS BLACK AS
WE ARE PAINTED
-
Volt Correspondent Tells of Wiscon
sin Man Who Fears Tigers and
70-BeIow Weather Here
Some of our Volt friends tried
sell their land around Volt. The first
answer that came was from a man
I who claimed that he could have had
Montana land for nothing 20 years
ago. The next reply is given just
as it appeared.
(From Last Week.)
Bayfield, Wis., Dec. 6, 1919
; .«.ST
trade? 1 don't think it would work.
1 never had any desire to live i
Montana. And your letter was mail
j ed at Wolf Point. That scares me
to read it. Me move out where there
sample the weather we are having
now.) I know a school teacher who
i came back from out there and said
snow got up to 30 feet deep some
places and folks wouldn't get out
until spring, and that once the snow
didn't go away until the next winter.
(And then he goes on and tells about
j his five-cent chicken ranch he wants
to trade.)
This is some boosting for Mon
tana, isn't it? But it isn't always
meant for everybody to live in Mon
tana when he buys land here, but if
once tried, Montana is hard to beat,
As to what that school teacher has
told him—well, we hate to say any
thing about school teachers, but they
are, as a rule, windy. "Experience
is our best teacher."
was wolves, bears, moose, buffaloes,
tigers and all that! (He must think
this is a circus instead of a grain
country.) I would get snake bit the
first summer, and I guess it gets for
cold about 70 below. (He ought to
Prof. Gross has disappeared, and
who knows what he will say about
his homestead. Prof. Woldt expects
to go to Canada for Christmas, so
that you can imagine that what he
don't say nobody will hear.
Well, boys, don't lose courage,
we've got a good crop coming, and
then we sure will take a crack at
some of those fellows who always
hear things about Montana and
The application made by Secre- ;
tary Foor for one of the tablets
struck by the government in com
memoration of the Maine disaster
never go to see what it is like.
-
TABLET MADE FROM
THE MAINE RECEIVED
has been granted and the tablet is
now in the secretary's office. The i
: tablet, which is about 12 by 16 inch- i
I es in size, and bronze in color is |
made of metal salvaged from the !
sunken battle ship. It is designed j
by a noted sculptor and shows Lib-1
erty in an attitude of grief looking
toward the bow and masts of the i
j
j
Judge Gordon has received a un
ique and beautiful greetings card
made in Bonnie Scotland which has
j was many times wounded.
I -
nearly submerged vessel in the dis
tance.
tablet be set in a suitable monument
in the Park x-eserve.
It is the intention that the
Greetings from Scotland
attached a sprig of genuine Scotch
heather. It was sent by the judge's ■
nephew, Captain R. R. McDonald i
who served all through the war and
a a a t'ligisiiiigisi
1 a
PIONEER NEWS
A bunch of young folks from this
community called on Mr. and Mrs.
P. A. Goerz in the Volt community
last Friday. I
The Christmas program of the
Bethel Sunday School was given in
the Pioneer school Dec. 25. A fine
program was given and it was well
attended. j
Mr. and Mrs. Corn Bartel and
children, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac and
daughter, and Mr. and Mrs. John
Bartel called on J. S.Schmidt's fam
ily last Thursday night.
Mr. Gräber from Munich, N. D.
is visiting friends in this community. 1
Mr. and Mrs. J.S.Sshmidt, Mr. and j
Mrs. A. F. Toavs called on Corn ; |ËÊ
Bartel's last Friday. |Ë|
Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Miller and ^Ë
childi'en, Mr. and Mrs. Callison and ! ËËi
sons, and Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Isaac |s|
and daughter called on Corn Bax-tel 1 ^
Sunday. =
Laurel and Donald Walter were ËË
_
spending their Christmas vacation in ! ==
this community. ==
._
Mi's. Spencer Mr. Slim and Mr. Han- j ==
son called on Lund Fevig.
Mr. and Mrs. Ferd Funk and ==
Mr. and Mrs. John Bartel, Mr. and
children and Miss Agnes Funk call-1
ed on John Wiebe's Sunday.
The Schmidt folks and Mr. Gräber
called on Ferd Funk's last Sunday.
- J. B. Schmidt is satisfied with
the nice weather we are having at
present as Mr. Schmidt has a good ;
start at his new barn, and a few i
more days and the building will be
finished.
Why,who isn't glad for
such nice weather at Christmas time
Mr. Gräber, Mr. and Mrs. J. S.
Schmidt and family called on Zack
Bartel for supper last Saturday.
FROID TRIBUNE PRAISES
HERALD'S HOLIDAY ISSUE
Among the county papers to issue
I special Christmas numbers was the
Wolf Point Herald to blossom out
I in full holiday attire with a 24-page
edition with cover in colors.
edition contains a vast amount of in
teresting reading matter and plenty
of well-wntten advertisements of
the business firms of that city. To
say the least, the Herald's Christmas
number is one of the best received
at our desk thus far this season.—
Froid Tribune,
--
The
EVERYBODY HELP GET
FULL ACCURATE CENSUS
Charles Gordon and John Erick
son have received notice of their
appointment as census enumerators
for Wolf Point,
their duties on January 2 and are
required to complete the census of
the city in two weeks.
Secretary Foor of the Commercial
club wishes to say to any who ex
pect to be absent from the city dur
ing the period of January 2 to 17
that if they will come to his office
before leaving the city that he will
take from them the data necessary
to get their names on the census
roll.
that a full and accurate count of the
population of the city be made and
the careful cooperation of everyone
is requested.
They will begin
It is exceedingly desirable
Executive Meeting of Red Cro»»
There will be an executive meet
ing of the Red Cross committee at
the home of Mrs. Clyde Patton next
Monday afternoon at 2:30.
SHERM WOULD HAVE
FAVORED THE LEAGUE
General Sherman's often quoted
statement regarding war, is not
known by many in its entirety.
Here is what the general really did
say, and it is a classic :
"I confess without shame that I
am tired and sick of war. Its glory
is all moonshine. Even success, the
most brilliant, is over dead and
mangled bodies, the anguish and la
mentation of distant families ap
pealing to me for missing sons, hus
bands and fathers. It is only those
who have not heard a shot nor
T 0 , ard , a Sh0t I
heard the shrieks and groans ofthe |
'wounded and lacerated, that cry ;
a j oud for more b i ood more ven
Eolation War i« i
hell!" isolation. w s ,
i
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The Right Start for
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1920
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MUCH DEPENDS UPON GETTING THE RIGHT
START IN ANY BUSINESS. PROFESSION OR AV
OCATION. YOU MAKE A PRUDENT SELEC
TION IN STARTING A CHECKING OR SAVINGS
ACCOUNT WITH US.
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Excellent Facilities for Good Service
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You, One ànd All,
A Happy and Prosperous 1920
We Wish
i
First State Bank
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MICKIE SAVS
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Best Boocnes Mts. tu' sousveu
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SUBSCRIPTION
RECEIPTS NOW
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READY V.
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Osui}
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Advertise it in the Herald.
Christmas at the Old Town Mission
The following very interesting program was given at the Presbyterian
Indian Mission School the afternoon of December 23rd:
Song—"Glory, Peace, Good Will
Responsive Bible Reading—"The Blessings of Christ's Kingdom."
Prayer— ... . . Mr. Oliver Moore
Recitation—Luke 2, 8 to 14. Primary Class
Song—"O. Daughter of Zion" . By the School
Solo—"On the Gloom of Midnight"—Julia Grandchamp, Chorus by School
Recitation—"The Christmas Message" .Mrs. Moore's Class of Girls
Song—' Unto You is Born a Savior" . By the School
Acrostic—"Unto You a Child is Born" . Seven Boys and Girls
Primary Exercise—"Christmas Catechism" . Eight Boys
Song—"Shout the Glad News" . By the School
Exercise—"Christmas Memories." ..
By the School
f
Edith Jackson, Helen Ironbar, Annie KiÜspotted
Song— 'Blessed Christmas Words" . By Senior Boys
Recitation—"The Best Gift" ...'Lillian Moore
kong— ^oel ' .. . .---. Senior Boys and Girls
Solo—'"Ctoce Upon a"Time" 6 .'"......^^"comlJSrïîiŸ'sS 11 'Red-Door
Chorus by Eight Girls,
Address—
Song— Y^* en Christmas Comes
ene lc lon ..
, Mrs - Kin £ had secretly made arrangements with Santa Claus, and
the Program closed bells were heard and dear old Santa made his way
through the crowded church to the platform. Santa Claus spoke kindly
words of good cheer that made the eyes of the young sparkle and the
older folks smile. This was the first time that Santa appeared in Old
J°wn. The children were more than delighted with him, and the older
ol P simply lpve Santa. Mrs. King and her staff of strong workers are
to be congratulated on making Wolf Point famed for Missionary enterprise
^■ c ^ vor
f
. . Rev. S. Mclvor
. By the School
Rev. Amos Oneroad
V
POSTPONED MEETING
OF NORTHSIDE VOTERS
Owing to the short time in which
to advertise it, and to other affairs
coming on the same night, the
meeting of Northside voters called
to meet at the Masonic building
last Friday night was very poorly
attended. It was decided not to
make any selection for aldermen,
but to advertise another meeting to
be held Saturday evening, January
3 at eight o'clock in the Northside
schoolhouse.
The Northside has been posted
with placards announcing the meet
ing. It is very desirable that there
be a large and representative attend
ance so that two members of the city
council who are acceptable to the
majority of the voters may be
chosen.
5
To the Dyspeptic
Would you not like to feel that
your stomach troubles are over,
that you can eat any kind of food
that you crave? Consider then the
fact that Chamberlain's Tablets have
cured others—why not you. There
are many who have been restored to
health by taking these tablets and
can now eat any kind of food that
they crave.

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