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The Wolf Point herald. (Wolf Point, Mont.) 1913-1940, April 01, 1920, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075272/1920-04-01/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE WOLF POINT HERALD
t
$2.00 PER YEAR
WOLF POINT, MONTANA, VOLUME VIII.
THURSDAY, APRIL 1, 1920.
NO. 6.
JOLLY SHRINERS
FROM EAST, WEST
"FIRST ANNUAL" OF LOCAL
SHRINE CLUB CALLS MANY
BROTHERS TO CITY
FUN RULES THE DAY
Street Stunts, Theatre Party, Big
Banquet and Ball at the
Sherman Hotel
The first annual meeting and ban
quet of the Wolf Point Shrine Club
and visiting shriners is in full swing
today. Large delegations of Shrine
members and their wives are in at
tendance from as far west as Havre
and east to Williston. Numerous
members from more distant points
also find it convenient to join the
bunch. A shrine club meeting is al
ways a sure sign of a good time for
everybody who attends, and this first
affair of the Wolf Point club is cer
tainly no exception. All through
the day, processions attended by fun
making stunts have been witnessed
on the streets. With the inevitable
fez on their heads and liberal appli
cations of war paint on their faces,
many of them dressed in clown
bloomers of the gayest hues and the
loudest patterns, the shriners and
their ladies are out for a goocf time.
"Quality Good»"
No. 1 came in about on time and
was met by a large local delegation
and escorted to the Sherman. E. J.
Rice was the general superintendent
of transportation. His slogan was,
"Nobody walks." To make good on
this proposition, he had contrived a
rig that will have to remain nameless
but consisted mostly of lumber, half
a dozen wheels and plenty of seats.
For motive power there was a large
white horse and an undersized mule,
a combination that proved entirely
successful and worked patiently
take the passengers wherever they
wished to go. The train from the
west did not arrive until after two
o'clock, which gave the bunch al
ready in the city time to work up en
thusiasm for a genuine Shriner's re
ception for their western brothers.
The Wolf Point band turned out to
meet No. 2 and headed the long pro
cession from the station to the Sher
man, which was, of course, head
quarters. The lobby was the scene
of many practical jokes and much
wholesome fun. Many were given
ride on the mule, and most everyone,
even some outsiders, tried the "elec
tric" chair.
Banquet and Ball
During the latter part of the af
ternoon the whole bunch attended
the matinee at the Liberty theatre
where the well-known comedy, "Are
You a Mason T
was presented on
the screen.
At 6:30 the banquet will be serv
ed. The tables have been set in the
spacious sample room, as the dining
room is in use for the cafe's regular
trade. The tables have been pret
tily decorated, with yellow and white
as the color scheme. Vases of cut
flowers at frequent intervals height
en the beauty of the scene. It is
expected that considerably more
thap one hundred will be seated. Af
ter the banquet the grand ball will
(Continued on last page.)
A special meeting of Leonard
Dethman Post, American Legion,
was held Tuesday evening to consid
er the matter of attending a Legion
encampment to be held during the
summer at Legion Park at Trenton,
North Dakota. The Williston Post
is instrumental in encouraging the
encampment plan, which, it is ex
pected, will be attended by thirty or
more posts in Montana and North
Dakota. E. J. Whitehead and Fay
Bartholomew were chosen to attend
the meeting to be held at Williston,
at which arrangements will be made
for the big event.
LOCAL POST MEMBERS
TO JOIN ENCAMPMENT
BACK TO THE HOMESTEAD
Mr. and Mrs. Roland Shaw return
ed here last Friday and went out to
their homestead 32 miles north. They
spent the winter at South Bend, Ind.,
where Roland was employed in his j
brother's garage. He expects to find
employment for the summer at his ,
regular occupation of running gas j
!
tractors.
FIRE DESTROYS HOME
The home of Mrs. Mary Belcher
was practically destroyed by fire
early Monday morning. The fire was
started by the overturning of a ker
osene lamp and spread so rapidly
through the small building that the
family were able to save very little
besides the clothing they were wear
ing. There was some delay in turn
ing in the alarm, which gave the fire
such a start that the department
could save very little after its arriv
al. The residence was a small one
on Sixth avenue near Dawson.
Mrs. Belcher had the house and
its contents insured for $800, less
than enough to cover the loss.
FERRY SCHEDULE
UNDER DISCUSSION
NEW RATES MAIN SUBJECT AT
GENERAL COMMERCIAL
CLUB MEETING
The March general meeting of the
Commercial club, held in the Sher
man sample rooms Tuesday night,
was attended by a fair number and
was a strictly business session. Vice
president C. O. Moore presided. Dis
cussion of the question of ferry rates
for this season took up the greater
part of the time.
Mr. Littlefield, owner of the White
City, had represented to the club of
ficials that he could not operate his
boat this season at the old rates,
claiming that for the time he has
been here, something over two
years, the operating expenses have
been in excess of his receipts by a
thousand dollars. The cost of ev
erything connected with his business,
Mr. Littlefield declares, has increased
greatly, the same as in other lines
of business. The following is the
schedule proposed. The first figures
showing the former charge and the
second figures the proposed new
charge :
Ferry Schedule
, .15 .25
. ,15 .25
. .25 .35
. .40 .50
. .50 .65
. .65 .75
. .75 1.00
. .75 1.00
.50 .65
Foot Passengers .
Stock, per head .
Horse and rider .
Horse and rig .
Two horses and rig ..
Three horses and rig
Four horses and rig
Hayrack and team ...
Auto and driver .
Extra passengers, each .15
Engines, per h. p.
(except 8-16 and under) ..
There was free discussion of the
matter and comparisons were made
with the charges at other points
along the river. It was stated by
some who were in a position to know
that the charges made by the Mon-1
dak ferry were as high last year as
those proposed by the Wolf Point
ferry, and in fact, on some items,
higher. While it was deplored that
Southside farmers should be put to
increased expense at this time, no
alternative could be seen, if Mr.
Littlefield was unable to operate his
boat at the old rates. Securing an
other efficient ferry of good capacity
to operate at the old rates would not
be an easy matter, it was thought.
It was voted that the new schedule
be recommended to the trustees of
the bridge company with whom the
ferry makes its contracts.
Advertising
.25
1.00
3.75
Secretary Foor brought up the
matter of advertising, explaining
that the directors were planning pub
licity matter and suggestions were
j needed. Several good ■'suggestions
were offered, including the idea of
playing up the prospects and possi
bilities of Wolf Point oil fields. Mr.
Foor explained that the Roosevelt
Highway association was preparing
to publish booklets advertising the
country along the route, and that
Wolf Point would be allowed space
in the books which would be given
nation-wide distribution. He also
been offered, to use the figure of a
explained that it was necessary to
adopt a design to be used as a mark
er along the Powder River trail from
Moose Jaw to Denver, which is spon
sored and promoted by the local
club. A suggestion that had already
bucking broncho and rider, was well
thought of, and it was decided to go
ahead and secure a suitable design
I
I
of this sort.
into the Walters Drug Company ;
building as soon as the drug store is
NEW HOME FOR "HOME"
The Home Meat Market will move I
moved into the new building across
the street, just being completed by
the Farmers' Lumber Co.
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Eastertide in the Heart
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HE KEYNOTE of the world's Easter
"Immortality."
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song is
In answer to the question,
If a man die, shall he live again?" the
Easter chimes ring out "He shall live!"
1 here is something in every man that knocks
at the door of a larger life,
itself in a world too small and a life too short to
realize its longing.
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Something; that finds
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The Easter message gives us the most com
prehensive and clearest conception of a future life.
All doubts concerning our "Immortality" is remov
ed from the realm of speculation and placed be
We love the flowers,
they are so charming and beautiful, but
or Easter lily can ever equal in beauty man's hope
of the life immortal.
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fore us, an eternal verity.
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no rose
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The gift of eternal life is
God's greatest boon to man, and places within him
what we might call Spiritual Springtime
tinual Eastertide in the heart.
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Then
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we count Easter Sunday
the brightest jewel with
in the circle of the year.
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LAST CHANCE TO
REGISTER, ON SAT.
-
WATER BOND ELECTION APRIL
10—URGENT NEED OF MORE
WATER FOR CITY
Have you registered for the water
bond election? If you are an owner
of real estate, you are qualified to
vote at the special election called for
Saturday, April 10, to decide the
question of issuing bonds in the sum
of fifty thousand dollars to increase
the capacity of the city water plant
. and extend the mains so that water
service may be more equallv distri
buted over the city. If you wish to
vote at this election, you should reg
ister, and there is just one oppor-1
tunity remaining.
March 29 and 30 were registration
days and a small number registered
with Judge Gordon, the appointed
registrar. Saturday, April 3, the
lists of those who registered will be
open for inspection at the registrar's
office, and any who desire to register
may do so.
Notwithstanding the fact that nu
merous articles of considerable
length, dealing with the water ques
tion and the bond election, have ap
peared in several issues of both the
Promoter and The Herald, it appears
that some were unaware that an elec
possible publicity and have carried
on the necessary proceedings strictly
pliance with state law, provides in
detail the manner of registering vo
tens for special elections. This or
dinance will be found in full in this
tion on the water question was pend
ing. The city officials have taken the
utmost pains to give the matter all
according to law and the city ordi
nances.
Ordinance No. 49, drawn in corn
issue.
If you are qualified to vote, and
desire to vote, and have not register
ed, there is one more opportunity for
you at Judge Gordon's office Satur
day, April 3, between the hours of
nine a. m., and nine p. m.
More Water Argument
There can scarcely be a doubt
that the water bonds will carry, but j
for the benefit of any voters who
may be undecided The Herald feels
these bonds should issue,
aid is influenced by no personal mo
j, j. a. • . . . I
it is a public duty to recite a few of
rvor.-,, + ,
many important reasons why
The Her
the
tives. The editor has city water on
his bit of ground and he is willing
that the "other fellow,
who is with
i out wAter, should have it.
j matters now stand a great many
i the "other fellows" must go without,
even though they are helping pay
! the present plant.
But
In a nut shell: The rapid growth
of the city has rendered the capacity
j of the present pumping plant and
tank wholly inadequate to the needs
of even the south part of town. All
; parts of the corporation must share
the obligations of all water bonds,
so all parts should receive the benefit
impartially. The present water sup
ply is unsafe as fire protection, even
where the mains extend. An ade
quate water supply would reduce in
j surance rates,
ter, at a low rate, needed industries
With plenty of wa
i ,
i f ch as f/^eamery and steam laun
i dry would be more likely to locate
here.
ment has to be partly supported by
: a *- ax I ev y- With an enlarged and im
Proved system, taxes would
<luced because the department would
be selfsupporting and yield
revenue toward the payment of the
j bonds,
1 concern to Northsiders, who should
look out for their interests at both
the city and bond election. Regis
ter, and vote—"For Bonds."
|
With the present inadequate and
expensive water system, the depart
be re
some
The water question is of special
FARMERS MEETINGS
SET FOR NEXT WEEK
1
I
Farmers' meetings are announced
for next Tuesday afternoon and eve
ning> April 6th with the
Wide
Awake Farmers' Club . County
Agents F. J. Chase of Roosevelt and
Murray Stebbins of Valley county
will be present. Farm accounts,
silos, and summer fallowing will be
the chief topics. Rev. Alfred Hen
drickson and A. M. Foor will also be
present to assist with the meeting.
Wednesday evening there will be
a meeting at Piety Hill school house
in charge of the county agents. Farm
crops, silos and community life will
be discussed.
IjIliügigagliïSI
y BIRTHS ^
laSlgggiggiigiaiig
To Mr. and Mrs. Henry Anderson,
. , „ ,
a girl, on March 24. The little one
, , , ,, .
aaS been named Marian Anna.
To Mr. and Mrs. Fred Waller, a
boy, Kenneth Arnold, on March 27.
To Mr. and Mrs. Stonewall Jack
son, a boy, March 31.
of
as
DEFINITE ACTION
BY DEPARTMENT
TRACT OF LAND WILL BE PUT
ON SALE AS RESULT OF
CLUB EFFORTS
The Commercial Club directors,
during the past six months have been
working through Secretary Foor to
have the Indian department recom
mend the release or opening of cer
tain lands adjoining the original
townsite on the east and west. The
land surrounding the corporate lim
its of the city being held in reserve
by the government for irrigation or
other purposes makes it more diffi
cult to secure than if it were pri
vately owned.
Major Mossman, superintendent of
the agency at Poplar, has been very
kind and helpful in assisting Secre
tary Foor with the business, which
has required a vast amount of cor
respondence. The Major was here
Monday and met with some of the.
club officials and reported the latest
results, which were very gratifying,
The departmnt has recommended
that an eighty-acre tract, adjoining
the Great Northern right of way on
the south and the original townsite
on the east, be platted and opened
after the manner of "First Addition"
south of the original plat. This tract
to the east includes the ground
where the mill stands. It is partic
ularly desirable that ground in this
location be made purchasable so that
warehouse and similar sites may be
available.
Special Act Needed
The tract on the west has a differ
ent status, according to the state
ment of the Indian department offi
cials, who say they have no author
ity to sell it without a special act of
congress. The Commercial Club offi
cials feel that it will be quite possi- ,
ble to secure such an act and Sec
retary Foor will at once take up the
matter with Congressman Riddick in
an effort to get a bill passed by this
session of congress allowing the de
partment to dispose of an eighty
acre tract.
This ground is much needed as an
athletic and aviation park, in fact,
part of it is now occupied under
lease by the present ball grounds,
The flat just west of the ball grounds
is an ideal spot for an aviation field,
The aviators who landed there last [
fall stated that there was no finer
landing ground in the state.
SCHOOL AND CITY
ELECTIONS NEAR
DISTRICT NO. 45 VOTES SATUR
DAY, APRIL 3, ON ONE MEM
BER OF BOARD
CANDIDATES ARE FEW
Labor Ticket and Three Independent
Candidates Comprise
City Ballot
Once more the attention of citi
zens is called to the four elections
j that occur in April. First, there is
election for school district No. 45 to
be held Saturday, April 3, at the
j Southside school building. One mem
ber of the board of school trustees
I is to be elected to succeed John F.
j Cook, whose term expires. The vo
ters will find on the ballot the names
j of T. H. Fox and L. A. Kragrud.
I Both men are well known, Mr. Krag
; rud being a furniture dealer and Mr.
Fox a railroad man, holding the re
sponsible position of chief dispatch
er. Mr. Fox resides in ward two
on Edgar street at Fifth avenue.
City Election
On Monday, April 5, occurs the
jcity election, when a mayor and four
aldermen will be chosen. For mayor
two candidates are in the field, the
present incumbent, O. T. Stennes,
and Frank Smith. In the first ward,
IL. A. Kragrud is unopposed for
member of the council to succeed H.
B. Tyson, whose term expires. In
the second ward, there are two op
posing candidates, W. L. Young and
W. B. Everett. In the third ward,
Ed. Nichol, R. G. Ferguson and Bert
Lynn have filed as candidates. Mr.
Nichol at present holds the office of
alderman from his ward, having been
appointed when that ward was cre
ated.
; Ferguson and Lynn r;re running on
; the labor ticket. With Mr. Kragrud
I unopposed in the first ward, and on
ly one opponent with two places to
fill in the third ward, the laboring
people of the city are certain of be
ing represented by at least two mem
bers of the city council. It is fitting
and just that the laboring men and
railroad population of the city should
have representation and it is a hope
ful sign for continued good govern
ment to have them take an active
interest in city affairs.
For Mayor
The Herald has no word to say
against any of the candidates, but
in the matter of choosing a mayor,
it would seem to be justice and good
judgment to keep Mayor Stennes in
the position for another term,
Mr.
Stennes has served but a part of a
term, being appointed when John
Listerud resigned. He has been com
petent, faithful and efficient. His
record in office will bear the closest
inspection. He is well acquainted
with the rather intricate situation
is an enterprising and unselfish citi
that necessarily obtains when a
young city is at that stage where
Wolf Point finds itself.
Mr. Stennes
(Continued on last page)
ICE RUNS OUT; FERRY
SOON IN SERVICE
The ice in the river which broke
up at this point a week ago Sunday,
and moved for a few hours, started
again last Sunday afternoon, and the
river ran itself clear by Monday
morning. The ferry, "White City,"
expects to be running again in a few
days. Mr. Slawson's power launch
is carrying foot passengers in the
meantime.
Several farmer rigs were maroon
ed on the other side of the river
from Saturday afternoon to Monday,
the owners having left them there
while they came across in rbwboats
The river rose seven or
Saturday,
eight feet in a short time and then
clogged with ice, leaving the owners
cut off from their rigs. All the
horses were safely recovered when
the river cleared Monday.
BIRTHDAY PARTY
Last Saturday afternoon Hazel
Chapman entertained a number of
her little friends at a delightful par
ty, the occasion being that of her
tenth birthday. After spending the
afternoon playing games, a dainty
lunch was served. The hand-painted
invitations were especially pretty.

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