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The Wolf Point herald. (Wolf Point, Mont.) 1913-1940, April 01, 1920, Image 2

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075272/1920-04-01/ed-1/seq-2/

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HARLEM FARMERS FORM SUMMER FALLOW
CLUB; SIGN UP FOR OVER 4,000 ACRES
people
around Harlem, 150 miles west of
here, are working together to pro
mote the practice among the farm
of summer-fallowing a portion
The "Sum
mer Fallow C lub is proving a pop
ular idea as shown by the following
from the Harlem News ot March - 0
1 he 19-H Summer hallow Club
It is here as one of the most,
The town and country
ers
of their land each year.
here.
impoi'tant oi'ganizations in the coun
try, if n"ot the most important organ
ization in this community, to work
out the problems connected with dry
fax-ming. It is an ox-ganization of
dry-land fai'mers of the Harlem com
munity, who desire to work together
in a determined effort to find out in
the shortest possible time the best
method or methods of faxming our
di - y-land sections so that some pro
duction will be foi'thcoming every
The basis of the experiments
year.
at this time are the various methods
of Summer-Fallowing.
The organization of this important
club was completed last week when
the Dry-land Farming Committee of
the Harlem Development Association
made a tour of the Big Flat and held
meetings at Turner, Silver Bow and
Twete, all of which were very well
attended. The meeting slated for
Little Jewell on Monday was not
held due to the blizzard that covered
the Flat on that day, but on Tuesday
many of the Little Jewell people
went to Turner to the meeting
there. The committee made it plain
LETS I To the FARMERS | get
and MERCHANTS of Montana
We are taking this means of announcing
the opening of our new
CREAMERY, ICE
CREAM FACTORY and PRODUCE HOUSE at
DEVILS LAKE, N. D.
plete, UP-TO-DATE PLANT
Without question this is the most com
in the NORTHWEST, equipped with every modern device for
making the highest grade BUTTER and ICE CREAM and for
handling CREAM, EGGS, PACKING STOCK BUTTER, LIVE
DRESSED POULTRY, HIDES, PELTS, WOOL, ETC.
and
the HIGHEST MARKET PRICE
HONEST TREATMENT and PROMPT RETURNS.
GET AWAY FROM THE LONG HAUL AND LOSS AND DAMAGE
IN TRANSIT. SHIP TO A NEARBY RESPONSIBLE HOUSE
THAT HANDLES EVERYTHING GROWN ON THE FARM EX
CEPT LIVE STOCK AND GRAIN. DROP US A CARD AT
DEVILS LAKE IF YOU DO NOT RECEIVE OUR QUOTATIONS
WITHIN THE NEXT TWO WEEKS.
Yours For More Dairy Cows,
at all times;
We will
pay
give you
THE R. E COBB CO.
DEVILS LAKE , N. D.
ST.PAUL, MINN.
COWS
MORE
MAIN OFFICE:
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Your Fordson is here!
OW it is here—you can get one. Simplicity to
an unusual degree—yet with a ruggedness and
durability that enables it to accomplish a
remarkable amount of work.
N
-the cheapest fuel. Can be oper
ated by anyone. Turns in the close places. Four
cylinder engine. Thermo syphon cooling system; all
Working parts enclosed. Improved air washer.
Bums kerosem
The Oliver No. 7 Plow
The Oliver No. 7 answers every requirement. Uni
form plowing in all soils—a ruggedness that enables
it to stand the severe strains. And the combined
rolling coulter and jointer buries all trash at the bottom
of the furrow ; the stop device maintains an even depth
of furrow.
We
Come in and see the Fordson and the Oliver,
sell them and know they will please you.
MOTOR SALES COMPANY
WOLF POINT, MONTANA
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at all times that they were not bring
ing anything new into the country,
nor wcie t ev tijmg 0 6 611
farmer nem s ou , a ! l " > U
that the proposition ej ac o pie
-1 sent was one in which every farmer
shou e in eies Li ^cau^e 0 AQ
importance of solving the dry-farm
ing question .n tie comm uni v.
e comui. ee nla< ( 1 a ' n 1 ,
the on \ w\ in " 1C1 ev f 1 ^ uie(
m the proposition was to act as a
clearing house for the club. The
committee will keep a card record
of every piece of summer-falbw, and
will keep this record carefully until,
the fall of 1921. Then the results
....
summer-fallowing on all the pieces;
„ , ,, .
of summer-fallowing in the commun^
... . . , , . j , . .
itv will be tabulated and issued to
./ , n ,, , , ▼ , *
the members of the club. It is a co
, 1 ■ u
operative movement only in which
„ „ , , ,. ,
all farmers work together, each do
, 1 ., , •
mg his own part of the entire pro- (
. .
gram bv summer-fallowing one piece
p . . rp,
or more on his own farhi. t he mem -1
, „ „ I
her may summer-fallow so many
, , ,
acres of 1919 fall plowing, so many
. .. . .
in April or May, and so many in
_ . , . ,
June. The farmer is pledged to keep
„ , , . . ...
a careful record of each, which rec
, , ^ „ r.
ord he turns in to the Dry-Farming j
committee for their records, and mi
I
j
j
J
[
obtained from the various kinds of
this way the club will have several
hundred expei'imental farixxs in the
Harlem community this year, for !
each piece of summer-fallow is in [
reality a small experimental farm i
for the man who owns it, and also
for the community as a whole. In
this way the club members will find
i out pretty well by the fall of 1921
the best way to summer-fallow in
our community. The data that will
i be available from all these summer
fallowed pieces will be of tremend
j ^ ^ to the country , and to ey .
farmer in it
The committee in their tour of the
' Flat last week encountered the very
k| n( j S pj r it and encourage
^ wherfcver they went . They re _
port splendid meetings and splendid
^ ^ ^ ^ ^
ports are substantiated by the fact
that in this short time there are 67
members enrolled to summer-fallow
^ 00 acreg thig year for 1921
^ ^ of ^ ^ from g
^ ^ 50Q acres> but thfi
thig time is wel l over GO
& . . , , !
" 11 « ^Cresting to note that
j there are fourteen members of the
club already who are going to sum
mer-fallow over 100 acres this yeax - .
. , , . , J
This is how the club stands now',
_and the enrollment is just beginning.
J & 6
Most of the farmers w'ho attended
, , ,
the meetings took the membership
B , . v ., v
card home with them to decide the
, ,,
question of how much they would
, ..
summer-fallow this year, and these
, ...
cards will continue to come in everv
... J
day through the mail and in person,
T , J „ . •!"
The Dry-Land Farming committee
, . * cnri - ,, ,
have their guns on oOO fields of
, .
mer-fallow this year, and they make
. . J , .
the point that what they want is
numbe| . ()f fields rather than great
acreage, although acreage is highly
desirable because the px-oduction for |
1921 will then be that much moi'e i
of a sux-e thing.
Many farmers are planning
putting in a field of corn as well as
summer-fallowing, and the commit
i'e
sum
oil
tee intends to keep a careful x-ecord
j of how these corn fields that are well
! cultivated compare with summer-fal
; lowing in the production of wheat
j for the following year.
The committee wants to ux-ge ev
j ex-y farmer in this community to get
j into this experiment with at least 5
acres of 1919 fall plowing or 1920
j spring plowing or June plowing. It
I is a great big co-operative movement
j for the benefit of all, and all should
( do their part in it.
' Membership cards may be had at
J any of the business houses in Har
j lem who are members of the com
I mercial club.
The committee cannot say enough
of the hospitality shown them by all
I the people on the Big Flat that they
j visited. They ax-e strong for a bet
| ter and firmer co-operation between
I the town of Harlem and the farmers, j
i and intend to carry througly. ;
I work of the summer-fallow club in (
j the most efficient manner possible, j
so that every member of the move
ment will be given the best possible
sendee.
ESEHIilSlSSISHSHBlElilBI
S PERSHING COMMUNITY
isiBiiiiii a-® sagas
! Mr. ând Mrs. Hans Siljenberg vis
ited at the Archie Campbell home
Tuesday afternoon.
Mr. and Mrs. John Dorgan en
joyed a visit from Mr. Thompson last '
Wednesday.
Dorgan's team of black horses has j
not returned and Steve went out on
a trip of exploration last Wednesday. !
He has not returned, so it is not i
known whether any trace of the
horses was found at all.
Many people experienced great j
losses in their cattle herds last Mon- i
; day, but the most serious which we
have heard of was the one experienc- i
ed by Lige Crawford who lost twen- j
ty-four head. His barn was so built
that snow piles formed on the roof
to a depth of about four feet, which
; broke the roof and killed many head
outright, and others were hurt so
badly that they died from the in
juries.
The Red Cross met at the Carlson
I home last Thursday. On account of
■ the poor roads, this community was
j scarcely represented.
Ben Strand left last Sunday for
Wolf Point with the intention of
bringing out Charlie Siegert and his
sister.
= John Dox-gan was seen around the
= West farm Saturday, where he went
E 1 with the idea of looking at horses
= I which West has for sale.
E Ibsen Ramstad and family came
E ! riding to the Dorgan hole last Sun -1
Jjj I day, where they spent the day. The ,
E j mud did not seem to hinder them at
E ! all, and they didn't use mud chains, \
E j either.
= Everyone is beginning to believe
E that spring is really here at last. The j
E fact that all the boys are back to
E j this community is almost enough to ;
E j make it a fact. Joe and Richard I
= j Camx'ud and Lloyd Hedstrom are the
E latest arrivals.
E Invitations are out for a surprise ;
= birthday party in the East neighbor
E hood on Tuesday.
= According to news just received |
E j Florence Siljenberg became the :
E I bride of Ernest Pierson on the six-1
= I teenth of the month. The ceremony j
E j took place at Enderlin, N. D. The
= 1 community joins in extending con
E I gratulations to the newly-weds and
E * hope that life on the matrimonial sea
will be long and prosperous.
NO COMPROMISE WITH SCRUBS
Whether bulls, boars, rams, or
i roosters—if they are in the scrub
class—they must go! This is the
declaration of West Virginia, which,
having joined the "Better Sires—
Better Stock" campaign, is going at
H ve-stock improvement with a will.
Already hundreds of farmers have
pledged themselves to use only pure-*
bred sires. Feeding demonstrations
arc to be numerous during the com
ing mont hs and whole counties are
planning to put on campaigns, the
pure-bred stock. It is expected that
within the next few months several
hundred head of pure-bred sires, and
also dams* will be brought into the
Btate as part 0 f the general program
to raise the livestock standard. Sev
eral counties undoubtedly will be
object of which is to seeux-e more
.
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MARY
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One of the
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It s a UNIVERSAL Picture ?
LIBERTY THEATRE /
TUESDAY EVENING. APRIL 6 TH [
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Outfitters for
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able to show a list of pure-bred sires
within a short time.—Government
Bulletin.
If a state as far back in the sleepy
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Home Meat Market
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Now Under New
MANAGEMENT
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is able to supply you with anything you want
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PRESUME ATS AND GROCERIES
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Our stock is being replenished daily with
the very best to be had. We cater to the par
ticular trade, those who are particular about
what they eat.
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Telephone your orders. They will be given
the same careful attention as though you per
sonally made the selection. Thone No. 58.
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Come in and Give Us a Trial
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A SQUARE DEAL TO ALL
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Sweet Gream and Milk
Fresh Every Day
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The
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Home Meat Market
E. C. NELSON, Manager
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East as West Virginia takes a stand
like this on pure-bred stock, it is time
for western states to look to their
laurels.

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