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The Wolf Point herald. (Wolf Point, Mont.) 1913-1940, April 22, 1920, Image 1

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THE WOLF POINT HERALD
'$2.00 PER YEAR
VOLUME VIII. NO. 9.
WOLF POINT, MONTANA, THURSDAY, APRIL 22, 1920.
MASONIC MEETING
WILL BRING MANY
MEMBERS FROM TEN OUTSIDE
LODGES WILL GATHER
HERE APRIL 29
LINDERMAN TO SPEAK
Wolf Point Honored by First Meet
f Northern Welfare
Association
mg o
Masonic brethern all along the line
looking forward to the first
meeting of the Northern Montana
Masonic Welfare Association with
interest as the date approaches. The
meeting will be held in Wolf Point
Thursday of next week and will
bring to the city, it is expected,
about 200 Masons from eleven
lodges, extending to Malta, to the
North Dakota line and up the branch
to Scobey.
Wolf Point Masons appreciate the
honor of having their city selected
for the first convention of the asso
ciation and are making thorough
preparations to take care of their
visiting brethern. They feel very
fortunate in having secured the con
sent of Frank B. Linderman, grand
potentate of Algeria temple, to be
present and deliver an address. Mr.
Linderman, whose home is in Mis
soula, is one of the most talented
men in the state. The following is
the program:
are
on
Program 7:30 P. M.
. Liberty Orchestra
Music
Address of Welcome,.
Bro. Rev. R. I. Stone
Bro. F. B. Gillette
..Masonic Quartet
Bro. Frank Linderman
Response.
Song—Selected
Address
Vocal Solo—Selected
.Bro. Harry Tyson
Business Meeting of Association.
Short Talks and General Discussion.
'America"
Refreshments furnished by Riverside
Lodge, Order of Eastern Star
The following lodges are members
of the Welfare Association and will
no doubt be represented at the meet
ing:
Song
Scobey Lodge No. 109, Scobey.
Eagle Lodge No. 103, Redstone.
Plentywood Lodge No. 91, Plenty
wood.
Kyle Lodge No. 96, Hinsdale.
Loyalty Lodge No. 121, Wolf
Point.
Northern Light Lodge No. 75,
Poplar.
Kotana Lodge No. 79, Mondak.
Malta Lodge No. 57, Malta.
Trowel Lodge No 67, Culbertson.
Saco Lodge No. 94, Saco.
The announcements of the meet -1
ing sent out to members by J. M.
Stewart of Poplar, secretary-treas
urer, say:
"Please be advised that the first
meeting of the Masonic Welfare As
sociation will be held in Wolf Point
Thursday, April 29th, at 7:30 P.M.,
at the invitation of Loyalty Lodge
No. 121, and that each and every
member of your lodge is cordially
invited to attend this gathering. The
program as arranged by Loyalty
Lodge is re-printed here in full and
gives promise of real instruction, en
tertainment and Masonic good fel
lowship.
■"All members who can arrange to
be present at this meeting are re
quested to. advise the Secretary at
least one week in advance, that pro
per hotel accommodations may be se
cured for all visiting Masons.
were in Wolf Point Monday |
POPLAR YOUNG MEN
MAY BECOME WOLVES
penenced in mercantile lines and
since they are returned from army
service, have been employed with
two of the largest firms in Poplar,
Mr. Neutgens with Cosier-Patch and
Mr. Kapinos with the Lundeen Mer- j
cantile Company. If the boys locate
in Wolf Point, they will find them
selves in a godd town and with a
good bunch to pull with.
Two young business men of Pop
lar, F. J. Neutgens and A. F. Kap
inos,
looking over the town with a view I
to engaging in business and, it is I
understood, practically completed a
deal. Both these young men are ex
ORGANIZE TO BUILD
TWO NEW MACHINES
A manufacturing concern has been
organized and incorporated under
the name of the Autosleigh Company
with headquarters at Poplar. The
incorporators are James Cairncross,
w. e. Me Garry, J. b. Dollard and
Dr. Bennett, ail but Mr. McGarry
Î2TLÂS
of manufacturing two pieces of ma
chinery, invented by Mr. Cairncross.
One of these is a vehicle fitted with
sleigh runners and also caterpillar
traction rigging—a sort of a winter
time automobile, the leading feature
being an equalizer that allows the
weight to rest in any desired propor
tion on the runners and the cater
pillar rig.
Mr. Cairncross has another inven
tion in the way of a caterpillar trac
tion rigging for a tractor, which its
backers consider a very valuable in
vention. A small model of the auto
sleigh is on exhibition in the office
window of McGarry & Saunders.
THE BUFFALO IDEA
FOR ADVERTISING
NEW YORK GRAIN AND MEAT
CENTER HAS SCHOOL CHIL
DREN WRITE LETTERS
Buffalo, New York, evidently is
enlisting her school children in a
"Boost Buffalo" campaign. The Her
ald has received a letter from a little
girl who signs herself Genevieve
Grierson and gives her age as 13
years. Genevieve is a pupil in "No.
52 school, Bird Avenue. Her letter
hurried right along, being dated
April 16 and postmarked 8:30 p. m.,
the same date, and reaching Wolf
Point, in the heart of the "Far West
on the early morning mail of the
19th.
The Buffalo idea looks like a good
one and might be employed with fa
vorable results by ambitions western
cities. It is not known whether the
plan extends beyond the newspaper's
or not. Little Miss Grierson's letter
is well worded, perfectly spelled and
neatly written (long hand) on paper
especially printed for the
Buffalo school campaign." When a
little girl does her part so well The
Herald will not fail in its part of
carrying on. So here is the letter,
and a copy or two of this issue will
reach School 52 in due time.
'Boost
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
City of Buffalo, N. Y.
No. 52 School, Bird Ave.,
Buffalo, N. Y., Apr. 16, 1920
The Herald
Wolf Point, Montana.
Dear Editor:—
This week of April 11-17 has been
set aside as a Boost Buffalo Week.
The purpose is to convince people
: that Buffalo has the facilities to de
j velop industries and to give people
some interesting facts about Buffalo.
Maybe you would like to know
(Continued on last page.)
steam plant to facilitate in testing
cream and cleaning cream contain
ers.
j
IWOnFRN STFÂM PÎ ANT
1T1UI/lj1 ' 1 ' ûlEAlU Itrtlli
IM TRpAlVI STATION
111 uiXLrtlfl JlrtllUll
The cream station of the Valley
Market and Grocery has been mod
ernized by the installation of a
The outfit consists of an upright
boiler in which steam can quickly be
generated, with pipes leading to the
different apparatus of the testing
room. The centrifugal tester is driv
en by steam and steam is carried to
a rack on ■which cans can be inverted
and all the cream adhering to the
sides of the can quickly be removed
by a blast of dry steam. This can
cleaning apparatus is a great bene
fit to the party selling cream, as it
is impossible to remove all the cream
by any other means. The cream
which would ordinarily be left in the
The testing room is fixed up in a
manner that allows it to be kept '
clean and sanitary and which facili
tates quick and accurate testing. W.
L. Young, the proprietor, believes
that dairying is going to increase in
this section and he is anxious to do
all he can to encourage the industry,
knowing that it will prove of great
can, but which can be removed by
steam, sometimes makes a difference
in the farmer's check of more than
the value of a pound of butter fat.
j
benefit to farm prosperity.
^ ?
Montana is Wet
I
I
SEVEN days since April 15 have been a period
il . , . „ ,
or such wetness that any lingering tears ot drouth
j ' have been dispelled, for the time at least.
bl0Ught eight inches 0r m °t e 0f SnoW S0 wet that
might better be called slush. 1 his melted as it fell and
j continued to melt during the next two da\ r S.
1
Î
The
The frost
jwas out of the fields to considerable depth and nearly
every bit Of the Water from the SHOW Soaked into the Soil,
The snow was followed by a drizzling rain that lasted
TViii woatlior at thne timo ( TVmrorl o-ul ic
the weather at tins time (Thursday)
several days.
still unsettled, sunshine, clouds and sprinkles taking
turns. Seeding is of course interrupted, very few fields
being fit to go onto. Roads are muddy, and the river
bottoms are said to be nearly impassable.
The moisture is a blessing whose value is hard to esti
mate. There is nothing like wet snow and rain in early
spring to put the soil in condition to cultivate and start
a crop. It looks like a wet season and a bumper year for
Old Montana. While this was being written a big, husky
fanner with a smile on his face entered the office. He
had two big round dollars in his hand for The Herald
(another sign of a good year). He even apologized for
letting his subscription expire April 1st and waiting until
the 22nd to renew it. He was from the Waska country
and admitted that the roads were tough and that it took
a long time to get in with a car,
fields are too wet to get onto and seeding will be late,
but we don't care; we want the moisture.
Old timers tell of seasons of so much rain that the
prairie grass grew as high as a broncho's back. That
was in times when they were not raising wheat and corn
crops would have grown. But it is probable that a big
Montana wheat field in a season like that would be an
uiisaf 6 place for anything short of a giraffe.
ihe three lean, dry years have brought their lessons
to every resident of Montan?. They have taught us
something about how to manage business and how to
farm; made us seriously consider the importance of di
versifying, getting cows and pigs on the place, raising
fodder and building silos.
If the wet seasons have come again, let's not fall into
the old errors, either in town or country business; de
luding ourselves with the hope that the seasons hence
forth will all be wet. Let's be wise—thrifty. Let's make
hay while it RAINS.
and flax around here, so is hard to estimate how tall those
tt
..
Yes
he said, "the
- '
THE OIL SITUATION IN THE LOCAL FIELD
11 e c eve °P nient °f the oil
! fields in other parts of Montana
j going forward with a rush, produc
ings wells being brought in and
ing rigs working night and day on
many locations, matter appear to be
at a standstill in the local field.
The situation seems to be that the
owners of the land will not give leas
es until the field is proven by the
sinking of test wells—and the field
cannot be proven until leases on the
It is exceedingly
Other districts are
reaping the prosperity that results
with certainty when oil is struck,
while we are passing up our oppor
tunity. No oil field is tested until
practically all the land near the best
, locations is under lease. The reason
this is that it is not human nature
j to risk a large sum of money with
land are secured,
unforunate.
ou t a S ood chance to get it back and
' more with it. It costs money to drill
oil wells—from $40,000 up, accord
mg to the depth. At Bowdoin it is
said that $120,000 has been spent on
a well and there is not a sign of oil,
yet. Local men have not the capital
to put down a well; money must be
r--- —.... » j
raised by the sale of stock, and stock
well
cannot be sold in a company that
has only a few scattered leases.
If a farmer has 320 acres of land
somewhere near a "location" he can
lease it under a lease that assures
him one-eighth of all oil produced on
that land whether there be one well
or twenty. He also gets 320 shares
of stock in the company. The local
company holds leases in Wyoming
and other Montana fields that are
far more promising than the Wolf
Point field and a holder of stock will
share in the dividends that the com
pany expects eventually to earn
there when the drills get onto their
leases. The Mon-Tex Company has
much better prospects in other fields
than here,
oil î lion or so to spend would come into
is the Wolf Point field and drill a dozen
, wells, without taking leases, and find
drill-(oil in three of them, the owners of
on j land near the producing wells would
be reap a rich reward. The owners of
the rest of the land would get no
the thing but left, excepting what they
might benefit from the general pros
the perity of the country. But philan-,
thropists are scarce. None of them
wil1 be drilling wells around here
w hen there are so many better oil
opportunities.
The oil game is a gamble at best,
and the best way to play it is to
share the risks and share the gains,
If too many hold out in the hope of
drawing the grand prize they
likely to wait a long time. The local
company is anxious to prove the lo
j cal field, but they never can do it
without co-operation. It is up to the
land owners,
-
is BURKE SUCCEEDS WHETSTONE
-
oil, George Burke, of Glasgow, one of|
1 the wheel horses of the Democratic
(party in this state, has again been
ueeu
appointed deputy game warden for
He will
Joe Whetstone,
who was made deputy after Burke
entered the service, resigned the first
of the month and has gone to Bil
bngs, where he will write insurance
part of northern Montana,
î cover Phillips, Valley, Sheridan and !
Roosevelt counties. Joe Whetstone,!
i
entered the service, resigned the first
the month and has gone to Bil
bngs, where he will write insurance :
and be interested in an oil proposi
tion.
In December of 1917, Burke gave
up a good job to enter the service,
He did duty at Kelly Field, Vancou
ver Barracks and at Atlanta, Ga.
The prince of good fellows and chock
full of ability, Burke made rapid ad
vancement in the army and would
have been made a captain but f*r
the signing of the armistice,
When I
he was discharged on March 17th he
was a second lieutenant. I
V WELL KNOWN RAILROAD
MAN DIES AT GLASGOW
t
Hollis Marriott, a well known and
il £
!
I popular Great Northern conductor,
died at the hospital at Glasgow on
the 19th. The immediate cause of
Mr.
i death was Bright's disease.
I Marriott was attacked by influenza
during the epidemic, but recovered
apparently aggravated the kidney
trouble which had bothered him for
! a long time.
Mr. Marriott was one of the best
liked men on the road and his death
I s * e . cau?e °f much sorrow among
bis Inends and associates. 1 he fun
eral services were held at Glasgow
Today and were attended by all of
£ "" ZV'-Z Zy
win be buried at'Glasgow where Mr.
and Mrs - Marriott formerly resided.
atives in Washington, d. c„ return
ed last week. There were no chn
dren '
HIGHEST MILITARY
HONORS CONFERRED
FRANCE SENDS MEDALS FOR
PRIVATE HANS L. TRETEN
SAND CREEK HERO
Two military decorations standing
for the highest honors that can be
conferred upon a soldier are in the
hands of Commander W. R. Squires
of the local American Legion Post,
waiting to be claimed by Hans L.
Treten of Sand Creek. These medals
are the Crois de Guerre and the
Medaille Militaire issued by the Re
public of France and awarded to
Private Treten for exceptional brav
ery under fire.
Hans Treten enlisted from the
STSÄ lïïtÂÏÏkS
: in all the important battles in which
' the Americans were engaged and l
îteen l^^nToSobeA ? i 918
; occurred the incident that won the
Montana soldier his high honors. His
in
German machine guns. The position
of the Americans was exposed and
the German fire was
costly.
killed part of the gunners, captured
the guns and took four German pris
oners.
had been returned to this country
proving very
Treten crawled forward,
After the American troops
the medals were forwarded by the
j French authorities to the
I military authorities in this country,
but Treten could not at first be lo
proper
cated. Finally he showed up in his
0 i d neighborhood and the Legion of
' fi cers got in touch with him
( mander Squires
Com
wrote the recruit
j ing officer at Spokane who had pos
J sess ion of the decorations, and thev
were forwarded to Wolf Point. They
will be presented to Mr. Treten as
[ soon as he reports to the commander,
; ; i t j s qu ite probable that the
French authorities got the spelling
0 f the narne wrong. If information
received from Sand Creek is correct,
j the name is spelled Twedten. This
i makes at least two Sand Creek sol
| diers who have been decorated with
the highest military honors for dis
tinguished bravery, the other being
; Sgt. Oliver Anderson.
are-tures
PROP AWT) ÏAROR RF
/llil/ LHDUA At"
PORT FOR MONTANA
j
I A favorable outlook for winter
wheat , rve in g00(] condition , a n un
satisfactory farm labor situation,
and a i arge reduction in the num
ber of brooding sows are shown in l
the April Crop Report for Montana
the April Crop Report for Montana
issued by F. W. Beier, Montana Field
Agent for the United States Bureau
The report:
Winter Wheat: The winter wheat
outlook for Montana shows
pro vement over last fall and the lack
0 f rnoisture at seeding time has been
followed by sufficient moisture
0 f Crop Estmates:
ouuook lor Montana snows an im
provement over last fall and the lack
0 f nioisture at seeding time has been
followed by sufficient moisture to
produce a condition 83 per cent of
normal compared with 91 per cent
one year ago and a ten year average
of 93 per cent. The condition on I
December 1, 1919, was 80 per cent)
compared with a ten year average
of 94 per cent. Little damage has
been found and a few reports of lim
ited areas that have suffered from
winter killing and other damage in
the central and north central parts
of the state have been received. The
(Continued on page six)
COMMENCEMENT
8TH GRADE MAY 19
I EXHIBITS ON MAY STH
I
i
j
MANY RURAL STUDENTS WILL
ATTEND—FIELD MEET
HELD SAME TIME
|
County Commissioners
Are Liberal
' In Inducements to Teachers
to Train
A mim ber of school districts have
no tifi e d us that their eighth grade
graduat es will attend the County
Commencement Exercises to be held
here May 19th. Many will not know
until after the examinations which
are to be held next week.
The following events will be held
in the track and field meet in the
morning.
1. —Baseball throw, girls.
2. —50-yard dash, girls.
3. —75-yard dash, boys, rural only
4. —100-yard dash, boys.
5. —220-yard dash, boys, rural.
6. —440-yard dash, boys.
7. —High jump, boys.
8. —Broad jump, boys.
9. —Pole vault, boys.
10. —Relay race, Vz -mile, four
Jjoys to each team.
Our county T'NvTnfer' Mtfn
again A? was the best Same coun
induce teachers to
al training during their vacation^ .r..
a recent meeting they made the fol
lowing decisions:
1st.—To all teachers attending
the state university, this county will
refund the tuition fees.
2nd.—The $5.00 not refunded by
the state for carfare will be refund
ed by this county.
3rd.—These offers apply only to
those who return to Roosevelt coun
ty to teach.
The University refunds all rail
road fare but $5.00.
The above offers are so liberal that
no teacher can afford to pass them
up. Many teachers from District
No. 45 will attend one of the state
institutions during the coming sum
mer.
Exhibits May 5
The School _ Exhibit will be held
Wednesday evening, May 5th. All
of the grades expect to show sam
ples of the work done this year.
Money prizes are being offered and
interesting exhibits will be displayed
in order to win them. A special pro
gram will be put on the same eve
ning. The first part of the program
will be given over to the declamatory
contest.
The fourth, fifth, sixth,
seventh, freshmen, sophomores and
juniors will enter contestants. After
this contest, the Camp-Fire Girls,
under the direction of Miss Leavitt,
will stage a play. The bread and
garment clubs of the domestic
sci
ence and art classes will prepare a
lunch. The proceeds from this will
be used to send the contestants to
the exhibit at Culbertson May 7th.
I On the same evening a picture ex
| hibit will be here. Pictures will be
1 sold the same as last year. Our
building has been made much more
attractive by the addition of the
beautiful pictures that we earned
last year. We get a commission on
each picture that you buy. This
commission is to be invested in pic
for our school.
A number of literary books writ
ten about pictures have been pur
chased. In this way the children
can study the pictures which we
have more intelligently. Such work
is made a part of the language les
The pupils are encouraged in
class to talk freely and naturally
(Continued on last page.)
sons.
ll/inC UATC
II AI lUiV fllüt VU It
TESTS SENTIMENTS
The Literary Digest has put on the
., . ,
^ P ■ en a P° e\er a
attem P ted > managed in a strictly
neutral and non-partisan manner,
Eleven million card ballots have
been sent to voters in every state,
^ a u
° U . C man\ era reac ers ave
received one before now.
Th e first returns, about 25,000
'ballots, show Leonard Wood leading
with about 3,000 plurality, first and
second choices, over Herbert Hoover,
who is leading Hiram Johnson for
second place by over 800. The first
(Continued on page 7)

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