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The Wolf Point herald. (Wolf Point, Mont.) 1913-1940, September 16, 1932, Image 1

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MONTANA
HELENA
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The Wolf Point Herald
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CORN IS MATURING
j| Many farmers say they have
Î the best corn they ever raised |
here. Good stand, large ears, I
mostly ripe. No hard frost yet.
WONDERFUL WEATHER
For harvesting, threshing, plow- |
Ing, digging spuds, rolling pump- |
kins and canning vegetables. This '
is Montana.
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Pioneer Voice Of The Community-—For Home And Country
NUMBER THIRTY-TWO
WOLF POINT, MONTANA. FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 16, 1932
HERALD— VOL. XX
ROOSEVELT LAYS HIS PLANS
BEFORE KANSAS FARM CROWD
DECLARES FOR NATIONAL
PLANNING IN AGRICUL
TURAL PRODUCTION
Speaking to great audience of
farmers at Topeka, Wednesday,
Franklin D. Roosevelt, governor of
New York, outlined a program call
ing for "national planning in ag
riculture" and declared the admin
istration's efforts for farm relief
had failed. He termed the activi
ties of the Farm Board as "specu
lative" and said they must come
to an end.
Six points upon which he said
most of the "reasonable leaders"
of agriculture had agreed in their
efforts to "restore agriculture to
economic equality with other in
dustries within the United States"
were cheered by the crowd. He said
the "claim that the republican dis
criminatory tariff methods are a
benefit to the farmer is a cynical
and pitiless fraud" and that more
republican tariffs might be expect
>■
ed from "the present republican
leadership."

)
Speaks at Capitol
Mr. Roosevelt spoke from a plat
form erected atop the steps of the
state capitol to a crowd estimated
by national guardsmen at more
than 10,000 persons.
As permanent steps in his pro
gram,
Reorganization of the agriculture
department to supply the adminis
trative machinery needed to build
a program of national planning.
Formulation of a definite policy
looking to the planned use of land,
including mapping and classifica
tion of land to determine which is
best suited to determine production
and which for trees.
National leadership in the reduc
tion and more equitable distribution
of taxes, including a national move
to reorganize local gov&rh
men
ment to direct the elimination of
of the tax burden from the
some
farms.
His emergency proposals called
for refinancing farm mortgages "to
believe the burden of excessive in
terest charges and the grim threat
of foreclosure."
The second immediate necessity,
he said, was to provide a means of
bringing about through governmen
tal effort a substantial reduction
in the difference between the prices
of the things the farmer sells
those he buys. He added that one
to attack this was by the res
international trade
through tariff readjustments.
He said the democratic tariff pol
icy consisted in large measure of
negotiating agreements with indi
way
toration of
PETER JOHNSON
DIES SUDDENLY
Funeral services were held Sun
day afternoon at the Clayton un
dertaking parlors for Peter John
who died suddenly Friday
son,
morning. The services were con
ducted by the Rev. O. R. A. Tollef
of the First Lutheran church,
son
and were attended by a number
of the friends and acquaintances
of Mr. Johnson.
Peter Johnson was born in Aale
Norway, in March 1868.
the son of Johnannes and Ri
gene Johnson. He came to the
United States in 1888. In 1906 he
took up land near Alexander, Mc
Kenzie county, North Dakota, and
proved up his homestead there.
Twelve or 13 years ago he came
to this section of Montana, living
the Southside first and later
buying land about ten miles north
the Volt road. He had long suf
fered from asthma, and it is be
lieved that death was caused by a
He
son,
was
on
on
heart attack. His body was found
Friday morning a little distance
from his shack by Mrs. George
Hagen who reported the death.
Two brothers and a sister survive.
They are Sakarius Johnson of Alex
ander, N. Dak. who was here for
the funeral, Hans Johnson of Port
a former Wolf Point resi
land,
dent ,and Mrs. Blate Wallen of
Straden, Norway.
J. B. OVERTON DIES
J. B. Overton, who was a resi
dent of the Southside for many
years, died last Friday, the cause
being heart trouble from which he
had suffered for some time. He is
survived by several children, all
of them grown with the exception
of a 14-year old son.
Funeral services were held Sat
urday and burial was made here.
vidual countries permitting them
to sell goods to this country in re
turn for the privilege of selling
American goods to them.
Six-Point Plan
Leading up to his six-point plan:
the democratic nominee declared;
" I want now to state what seems
to me the specifications upon which
most of the reasonable leaders of
agriculture have agreed, and to ex
press here and now my whole-heart
ed accord with these specifica
tions"
The specifications were:
"First—The plan must provide j
for the producer of staple surplus
commodities, such as wheat, cot
ton, corn (in the form of hogs),
and tobacco, a tariff benefit over
world prices which is equivalent
to the benefit given by the tariff
to Industrial products. This dif
ferential benefit must he so ap
plied that the increase in farm in
come purchasing and debt paying
power will not stimulate further
production.
"Second—The plan must finance
itself. Agriculture has at no time
sought and does not now seek such
access to the public treasury as
was provided by the futile and cost
ly attempts at price stabilization
by the federal farm hoard,
seeks only equality of opportunity
with tariff-protected industry.
"Third—It must not make use of
any mechanism which would cause
our European customers to retali
ate on the grounds of dumping. It
must be based upon making the
tariff effective and direct in its
operation.
"Fourth—It must make use of
existing agencies and so far as pos
sible be decentralized in its admin
istration so that the chief respon
sibility for its operation will rest
with the locality rather than with
nevL ci eated bureaucratic mach
inery in Washington.
"Fifth—It must operate as near
ly as possible on a cooperative
basis and its effect must he to en
hance and strengthen the coopera
tive movement. It should, more
over, he constituted so that it can
be withdrawn whenever the emer
gency has passed, and normal for
eign markets have been re-estab
lished.
"Sixth—The plan must be, inso
far as possible, voluntary, I like the
he
It
put into operation unless it has
the support of a reasonable pro
portion of the producers of the ex
portable commodity to which it is
to apply. It must be so organized
that the benefits will go to the man
who participates.
LEAVITT'S STAND
ON PROHIBITION
Last Spring when the Beck-Lin
thicum hill was brought rather sud
denly before the national House of
Representatives Scott Leavitt vot
ed against it. Great numbers of his
constituents petitioned him to do
so. The measure was aimed at un
qualified repeal of the prohibition
amendment, which simply means
the return of the saloon. His op
ponents are now spreading the
propaganda that he is opposed to
popular vote on the question.
The Second district congressman
was at Malta last week and was
interviewed by Editor Larcombe of
the Phillips County News.
The News is today publishing
the interview which contains the
following statement.
"It has been brought to my at
tention that there exists in this dis.
trict an impression that by my neg
a
ative vote on the Beck-Linthicum
measure during the last congress I
denied the Montanans of this dis
trict an opportunity to express
themselves in a proposed referen
dum on the prohibition question.
This impression is entirely in
error. I am not opposed to permit
ting the people to express them
selves on a properly worded amend
ment to the eighteenth amendment
which will prevent the return of
the old saloon system in any form
and which will also guarantee the
protection of staSes which wish
to remain dry.
This does not mean that I have
changed my own personal views
regarding the liquor traffic, but
it does mean that I recognize the
right of the people to express them
selves in, accordance with their
own convictions."
Scott Leavitt
Coin Car Turns Over
Occupants Badly Bruised
When Mr. and Mrs. Earl Goin
from northeast of Poplar were re
turning Monday from the Valley
fair they had the misfortune to
have their car upset near Toulee
Creek. Both were badly bruised and
were brought to Wolf Point for
medical care. They were lucky not
to have been more seriously hurt
than they were.
SWIFT WORK BY
THE LAW'S ARMS
ROVING GENTS WANTED RIDE,
AND GOT LONG ONE—TO
DEER LODGE
People living on West Main,
j'ust west of the Farmers Union
Oil station heard a noise, two o'
clock Thursday morning. Peeked
through window, saw men rolling
a Ford coupe by hand away from
the house occupied by Ted Will.
Ted was tipped off to the game.
only a block away. Car was locat
ed by Todd near the stock yards
with two colored gents inside, j'ust
about set for a long, fast ride.
Judge Paul came from Glasgow
that same morning on his way to
Plentywood. Direct information
filed.
"Guilty or not guilty?"
"Guilty, your Honor", (both of
them)
"One year, hard labor. Deer
Lodge" (for each)
Names; Jack Brown, James Rich
ard.
Pete Courchene had also plead
ed guilty, to forgery, and received
a sentence of one year,
morning a party was made up of
Sheriff Lowe, Deputy Charlie Man
ning, Brown, Richard and Courch
ene. All ticketed for Deer Lodge.
"Well," said the sheriff, to the
colored men, "how to you feel now,
hoys?"
"Just fine, Boss. I's a prize Utah.
Won the last leben fights by knock
outs. If I could have one mo' good
fight it would be just right."
Henry Lowe is known as an ac
commodating county official. But
of course he cannot be expected to
accommodate everybody. Still, he
gave Jack and James a ride. And
only about 30 hours after they put
in their order.
Friday
McCONE COUNTY
CHILD WELFARE
COUNCIL TO MEET AT CIRCLE
OCT. 1; HEALTH WORK
THE SUBJECT
The McCone County Child Wel
fare Council will meet in the court
house in Circle on Oct. 1st at 1:00
P. M. We are anxious to have the
best attendance possible in order
to discuss the health program for
this year. In order to have success
ful health work and a constructive
program we need the assistance of
all the organizations. The project
must fit the needs of the commun
ity. What is most necessary and
how that work cau be carried out
efficiently will an important issu.e
I am anxious that we have a
worth-while program w r hich will
prove that "an ounce of prevention
is worth a pound of cure." Health
education cannot be too strongly
emphasized or can our highest am
bitions be reached in a day or even
a year. It requires constant sin
cere effort on the part of the health
workers and the interest of (he
children and parents who realize
the importance of good health.
It is the ultimate aim of this
Child Welfare Council to promote
interest in attaining health, either
physically, mentally, or socially,
and to assist in the prevention of
disease. As methods which may be
applied to the needs of McCone
County will be discussed we are
eager to have a good representa
tion to this meeting.
—Grace M. Pike, McCone County
Nurse.
CANNING DEMONSTRATION
The Wolf Point home demonstra
tion met at the First Presbyterian
church this afternoon where a can
ning demonstration was given by
Miss Hart, county extension agent.
People who wished canning done
brought their materials and jars.
A CORRECTION
In the list of teachers last week
appeared the name of Virginia
Steele.
Virginia Settle.
This should have been
CULBERTSON,
NE. STARS WIN
2-GAME BALL CARD DRAWS
BIGGEST CROWD OF THE
SEASON
VIDA LOSES PENNANT IN 9TH
MALTA-SACO STARS ARE
OUT-PLAYED
The local baseball season devel
oped a real climax in the two-game
program at ball park Sunday. Two
good games—one of them a world
series thriller, and a gate of over
8200. Governor Erickson was pres
ent and threw the first ball of the
County league game,
gave him a rousing cheer.
A game between an all-star team
from the Malta and Saco communi
ties met Red Brandon's Northeast
Montana stars,
game hang-over from the '31 sea
son. Vida and Culbertson played the
deciding game of their County lea
gue pennant series. The receipts
the
The crowd
It was a. return
games.
The game between the Stars was
played first and displayed some
good ball although the final score
was lop-sided. The box score gives
the particulars:
All-Stars—
E A PO
0 0 0
2 2 2
1 0 11
0 2 9
0 2 0
0 2 2
0 2 1
0 0 1
13 0
0 0 1
4 13 27
Northeastern Montana
Pos. AB R H
9 5 11
4 2 10
2 2
Douglas
Jacobi
Brandon. 0 3 4
Hayes
Hansen
3
1
2 4
1
2
5 5
0
0
McCabe
Prend'gast 7 4
Funk
Ed er
Brandon. M 7 2
Total
6 3
0
1
8 4 2 1
14 12
0 0
37 12 9
Malta-Saco All Stars—
Pos. AB R H
6 6 0 1
E A PO
0 4 1
1 1 13
2 0 0
0 0 2
0 0 0
Millons
Murray
Singl't'n. G 6 4
Leondorf, G 7 4
Murphy
Blackorhy,
Parker
1
3 5
0
0 1
1
1
0
1
8 4
5
2
3
1
2 3
1
0 0 12 2
112 0 1
0 2 14 0
3 9 10 13 24
Eder 9, by Ward 4.
Off Eder 2, off
4 3
Blackorhy 9 3
Ward
Total
1 4
35
Struck out: By
Base on balls:
Ward 4.
Two-base hits: Hanson 1;
Three-base hits: O. Brandon 1.
Vida-Culbertson
The struggle for the county pen
nant was a game to keep the fans
on their toes and exercising their
lungs from the first ball to the
final out. The big delegation from
each town did loyal jobs of root
ing and the rest of the crowd sup
plied its quota of noise.
The usual complete score was
not received from the official scor.
er so the lineups and some of the
more important features are all
that can be given. The hatting and
pitching appears to have been
pretty even and for four innings
there was no scoring. In the 6th,
G. Singleton hit, made third on an
error and scored on a fly to center.
Vida was giving Dye good support
and Brown was keeping the hits
well scattered. After that nobody
crossed the plate till Culbertson's
half of the ninth. Hale, Reiter and
Mloen hit in quick succession and
Moen's slam was long enough to
bring his team-mates home. That
was the end of the scoring. George
Loendorf made a brave start Ru
rally, in Vida's half, that should
have at least tied the count, with
a
a two-bagger that might have been
stretched to three. But Williams
fanned. G. Singleton walked. Sorley
Hied out and Nefzger was thrown
out by Brown. From reports pick
ed up it was a nip and tuck, fast
clean, thriller all the way.
The
Herald man Was delayed at Glas
gow by a car break and saw only
the last three innings of the see
ond game.
The players and batting orders:
Culbertson—Hagen 2b, Hill lb,
Olsen c, Nicholson ss, Brown p.
Hale If. Rei'.er 3b, Moen rf, Bowers
cf.
Vida—H. Loendorf if. Dye p, M.
Singleton ss, Toay c, G. Loendorf
2h, Williams lb, G. Singleton 3b.
Sorley rf, Nefzger cf.
Hits—Vida 8, Culbertson 7.
Struck out—by Dye 9, by Brown 9.
Umpires : First game—Breeby
(Richey) and Clayton. Second game
—Breeby and McCabe. There was
much favorable comment on the
good work of the officials. Breeby
especially satisfied fans and play
ers.
Altogether it was a great wind
up for this season and fine boost
for 1933.
One Sox Team Likely
To Get Well Socked
The South Socks will play the
North Socks in a desperate game
of baseball next Sunday, Sept. 18.
at the Oscar Erickson farm north
east of town.
The teams are evenly matched
and this game is expected to cause
a small emotional
Contributed.
earthquake.
COMMUNITY GOLF
TOURNEY SUNDAY
The Golf club cordially invites
all who swing a golf club-mem
hers and non-members to get in on
a community tournament, planned
for next, Sunday.
Taking good weather for grant
ed, it will be one of the pleasant
est out-door events of the season.
A large attendance is wanted. Out
of town golfers are not barred,
WIDE OPEN INVITATION TO
ALL; COME OUT, PLAY
WIN A PRIZE
Men, women and duffers-you are
all expected.
Wolf Point business houses are
donating a liberal list of prizes j
for both men and women. It will
be hard to avoid getting something.
The plan of play is simple Re
port ot the first tee at one o clock
or soon after. You will be placed
in a foursome and will play 18
holes. You will not play against an
opponent but against that grouchy
old chap. Par. Strokes count, but
the fewer you accumulate the bet
ter for you. Remember—One o'
clock. Sunday.
Some of the boys say Doc Bur
gess will not get away with the
biggest hunk of the bacon this time.
Not if they have to put static in
his bag to ruin his sound swing.
Prizes for Men
1st Carton cigarettes
Huxsol Drug Co.
2nd Necktie, best in shop
Davey Tailors
3rd Pair best silk sox
Stephens Merc. Co.
4th Best leather belt in store
J. C. Penney Go.
5th Radio tube
Camrud Motors
6th Hair cut and shave
City Barber Shop
7th Pair best sox in store
O. C. Johnson
8th Hair cut
OK barber shop
9th Golf ball
Kearney's Smoke House
10th Rainbow water glasses
Stennes-McConnon
11th Hand painted dish
Wolf Point Drug
12th 2 quarts oil
Motor Sales Co.
13th 2 quarts oil
Westland Oil Co.
14th 2 quarts oil
Listerud Filling station
15th Safety razor
Kelly Hardware store
16th Quart of Varnish 4-ail
Monarch Lumber Co.
17th Pound best coffee
N. W. Service store
18th Pound best coffee
J. H. Coffey
19tb Quart Oil
H. Earl Clack Co.
Prizes for Women
1st 81.00 pencil
Hamburg Jewelry store
2nd One-pound box of chocolates
Norby's Sweet Shop
3rd Cake
Dick's Bakery
4th Cake
Sunnyside Bakery
5th Quart jar of preserves
E & A Cash Store
6th Quart jar of olives
Valley Market
7th 50 Visiting cards
The Herald
ATTEND CONVENTION
A large delegation from here at
tended the Cathalic convention at
Great Falls this week. They are
expected home this evening. Includ
ed in the number are Father A. J.
Richards, Ed Krebsbach, Mrs. Ray
Delaney, Mrs. Ranier Lenz,
Dougherty, Mrs. Tom Kelly, Mr.
and Mrs. J. H. Coffey, Mrs. W. J.
Kearney, Lucy Lenz, Mrs. W. C.
Johnson, Mrs. Severson, Mrs. Malt
by, Mrs. Ed Powers of Medicine
Lake, Mrs. Higgins of Poplar and
several others whose names The
Herald did not learn.
Joe
130 TEACHERS IN COUNTY
The county superintendent's of
fice furnishes the information that
60 rural schools in the county are
now open, and with the six town
schools, employ 130 teachers.
GLASGOW'S FAIR AND HIGHWAY
CEEBRATION GREAT SUCCESS
8-
EXHIBITS
PROGRAMS,
PLEASE LARGE CROWDS
FINE
SATURDAY
_
Saturday the editor and family
took their annual vacation. It was
a motor tour to Glasgow, After
drawing two days of inclement
weather the Valley county metro
polis got a break and had a great
last day for the county fair and
highway celebration. The forenoon
was well filled with stunts, a big
barbecue and the highway celebra
tion and dedication,
sweilel rapidly until bucking the
line for a bun and hunk of barbe
cued meat caIled for foo,ha11 train '
in «- B,lt there was P lent >' for a11 '
Tennis Ren of Wolf Point made
tw0 ^cessfnl parachute jumps,
A couple of truck loads of merchan
dis « over 500 art î cIes ' were
tossed ™ lt t0 the crowd
The completion, a few days fe
of- the Olasgow-Nashua unit
of Highway No. 2. virtually the last
The crowd
Viece of that highway in Montana
t0 be com P ]eted ' was the occasion
of a dedication program. Governor
Erjckson Congressma n Leavitt and
gcoM Hart division engineer, made
e]of|Uenf am] interesting address
es The ceremonv of dedicatin g an d
opening thp new roa( , was appro .
priately carried out
The 0pheim male singer s gave
severa , numbers at the dedication
apd agajn at the grandstand . Their
we „ trained voioes are very pIeas .
jng Md thejr étions roundly
app j auded
Fine Exhibits
The large exhibit hall was crowd
ed with splendid exhibits in every
department. Grain. vegetables,
flowers, dairy products, needle
work, 4-!H and school work—all
were surprisingly excellent. A long
procession of well bred dairy and
beef stock was paraded in front
of the grandstand while County
Agent Willson told all about them
over the announcing system. There
was plenty of class in the fine pro
gram of races, including several
horses owned or known here.
Points From Speeches
Governor Erickson stressed the
value of irrigation. He said it is a
fine thing to have roads which in
vite people to come into the state,
but it is much better to have some
thing to offer which will induce
them to remain here. Irrigation
would increase the productivity of
the land and enable ns to develop
our soil resources. He said that
when vast sums were spent de
veloping eastern and southern riv
ers and harbors, that was all right,
when the south was given assist
ance to fight the boll weavil, that
was all right, when the Panama
canal was built, that was all right,
and it is equally all right that, the
farming industry in the northwest
be given assistance. He said that
while Montana needs assistance in
developing her agriculture, at the
same time the east needs a mar
ket for her goods. Greater pros
perity; in Montana means more
orders going east for automobiles,
and hundreds of other tilings.
COMMITTEE ON
HOSPITAL NAMED
At, the Monday noon luncheon of
the Lions President Jensen an- j
nounced that President Camrud of i
the Commercial club and himself,
after careful consideration had
chosen as the committee of five
on the hospital project: Hugh N. |
John H.
Marron, F. E. Rathert.
Coffey, A. T. Listug and John Her- !
man.
At the Lions Monday meeting on
September 5. the matter of a mod
ern hospital was discussed after
hearing the offer of Miss Margaret
Beddor of Terry, and a motion was
passed instructing the president to
name a committee of five from
members of the Lions and the Com
mercial clubs.
Miss Beddor's proposition, as set
forth in last week's Herald, was
to bring from Terry her complete
outfit of hospital equipment and
.'urnish and conduct on terms to be
agreed upon, a small modern hos
pital if a suitable building is pro
vided by this community. The op
portunity is recognized as except
ional. Miss Beddor is a graduate
nurse with much experience. The
equipment she owns Ss new and
off the best quality. It is hoped
that this able committee will find
means of financing the enterprise.
Congressman Scott Leavitt call
j ed attention to the fact that there
i are more federal aid irrigation pro
j jects in Montana than in any oth
I er state in the union. The comple
i tion of the Roosevelt highway was
an example of a federal aid pro
ject. Because of muddy roads be
tween Great Falls and Fort Bent
he had had considerable troub
j on,
; le the previous day in getting to
Havre. He recalled that in 1919,
| when he was sent to Duluth to con
fer with the Roosevelt highway
committee, the plan was to have
the T. R. highway turn southwest
from Havre and pass through Great
Falls and Helena over what was
then considered a finished piece
of highway. Mr. Leavitt's argument,
which caused the committee to take
the route which was finally com
pleted. was that it would be no
particular honor to Theodore Roose.
velt to follow
trails, but that it would be much
fitting to blazon a new trail
o 1 d established
more
ests. And so the present route was
adopted. To him it was a signifi
cant thing that the highway which
13 years ago had been considered
a finished piece of work, is now
almost impassable under certain
weather conditions, while a fine,
gravelled, all-weather highway had
been constructed across the en
tire length of the state.
MANY ATTEND VALLEY FAIR
Among those who attended the
Valley county fair at Glasgow on
Saturday were Mr. and Mrs. A. T.
Llslug and Mrs. R. L. Stephens,
Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Yandell, Mrs.
Grace Severson and Harriet, Mrs.
Eli Maltby, Mrs. Parke and Patsy,
Mr. and Mrs. Guy Maltby and
daughter. Miss Marie Tessmanu,
Charles Gordon and family and Vel
Fishback, Mr. and Mrs. Harry
Dietrich and Mrs. J. W. Peterson,
Mr. and Mrs. Prank Gatlin and
Ernest
ma
Walton, Dr.
Catherine,
Cloud. Mr. and Mrs. Cash Moore,
Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Krebsbach, Mr.
and Mrs. H. N. Marron, Mr. and
Mrs. Scott Hart. Ray Kelberer and
family, Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Neut
gens, Geo. Flint, Mr. and Mrs. Ed
Camrud, Supt. and Mrs. F. H. Liv
ingston, Coffeys, Hermans and Lov
ells, C. L. Marshall and family.
Leora Simon, Mr. and Mrs. Russell
Harmon of the Southside, Marshall
Young, Howard and James Garden,
Eugene Dougherty, Delbert Myers
and his father. John McPeek, Lloyd
Montgomery, Joseph Montgomery,
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. McConnon and
children, Marvin Severson. Wilfred
Ben Youngkin and family
Gits,
and others.
From Froid there were Mr. and
Mrs. O. L. Gillespie. Mr. and Mrs.
Claude Carpenter of Poplar attend
ed. Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Dick and
J. J. Beier of the Lustre country
were also there.
Charles Brown of Waska had their
stand, but Charley was almost too
busy supplying people with ham
burger and hot dog sandwiches to
give his familiar spiel.
Mr. and Mrs.
SECOND ALL-STAR GAME
AT WILLISTON'SUNDAY
j The Montana All-Star ball team
and the Williston Legion Stars,
whQ played a sensational 10-inning
game a t Brush Lake two weeks
ago, will meet in a second game
Sunday at Williston, three o'clock.
The Montana team, managed by
Oliver (Red) Brandon won the
Brush Lake contest, 4 to 3. He ex
pects to have just as strong a team
for the second encounter and ex
pects to bear the laurels of the
district back to Montana,
In the
j posters advertising the attraction,
' Pete Slyter, loader of the Flicker
tail squad, says Red can't do it.
So there you are. Pick your bunch
and write your ticket.
I
FINE CROP OF MELONS
Wm. Meier, farmer and garden
er, just across the river, had great
success with an acre of musk mel
j of delicious flavor. Mr. Meier makes
j regular trips to Circle and Brock
j way as well as Wolf Point with
| his melons.
Ions this season, a new variety
which he had never tried before
which proved especially productive
and of excellent quality. They are
netted and gray-green in color
somewhat similiar to the famous
"Rocky Fords" and are known as
"Rocky Fords." Delivered right off
the vines they are ripe, juicy and

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