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Plentywood herald. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1908-current, December 30, 1937, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075293/1937-12-30/ed-1/seq-1/

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The Plentywood Herald
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF SHERIDAN COUNTY AND THE CITY OF PLENTYWOOD. MONTANA
$2.00 Per Year
Plentywood, Sheridan County, Montana, Thursday, December 30, 1937.
Volume 29, No. 19.
"1
CUTTING DOWN TO
mi ASÖ TACKS"]
4*
IS THERE AM
"YELLOW I'EJLUL?"
As Christmas was being celebrat
ed this year, we could not help won
dering what parents who have boys
In West Point or sons who had al
ready been graduated from the mil
itary training school and were do
ing service as officers in the regular
army either In this country or on
foreign soil were thinking about.
In the light of recent incidents such
as the sinking of the American gun
boat Panay by Japanese bombers,
and the continuation of conquest
against China, could they help but
speculate as to where their sons
might be by the time another Christ
mas had rolled around? Will Russia
Join forces with China in an effort
to check the relentless and invading !
Japs? Will other countries ally
themselves with Japan — will we
have another world war in which
the United States will become en- j
tangled? These are questions that
are on the lips of our people, and
Justly so.
!
I
j
j
The Panay Incident, so newspaper .
reports tell us, is closed, at least a
*
«I«
so far as diplomatic acceptance is
Concerned. Secretary Hull, in a for
mal reply to the final Japanese note
on Christmas day said "The govern
ment of the United States regards
the Japanese government's note of
Dec. 24, of action taken of it, as
responsive to the request made by
the government of the United States
in this government's note of Dec.
14 ." Now that's just the Secretary's
way of saying, "O. K." Full repara
tion, however, which the Japanese
government has assured, is not go
ing to allay the fears of the Ameri
can people as to the danger of war.
Neither is it going to entirely sat
isfy parents of army officers that
(heir sons will not be marching at
the head of troops in another de
bacle more costly in lives and mon
ey than any military campaign the
world has ever known
i
i
*
Following the sinking of the Pan
ay all sorts of theories were ex
pounded as to what attitude Ameri
ca should take. Through it all, re
flecting on Incidents leading up to
the World war, we could not help
reading such headlines as, "Ameri
can Ships Are Sunk," or "Twenty
Americans Killed," with a feeling
of peculiar familiarity. The mind
quickly reviews the years past when
similar incidents broke like, a thun
der storm over the American hor
izon. Bristling militarists now there
will be who will demand immediate
appropriations from the federal gov
eminent to increase the air forces,
build more battleships and swell the
army. And it will probably aiuuse a
wave of enthusiasm among those
who believe America shou.d prepare
now for war in the Orlent-prepare |
for preservation of the while race
aualust the "Yellow Peril."
j
I
» * *
That will be the cry instead of
"Make the World Safe for Demo
cracy." Then there are those who '
openly maintained the American
gunboat had no business sailing up
the Yangtse river just in the in
teresls of protecting properr,- of the
Standard Oil company, and that the
only safe and sane course is prompt 1
withdrawal of our armed forces j
Horn China. Objection to that the--1
ory is found by some commentators
lu the suggestion that that is pre
cisely what Japan wants. Li other
words, the two nations that the
Japanese government seems to tear
the most is the (Tilted States and
Great Britain. Should
these
two
their
great countries remove alt
armed forces from China, then, it
is argued. Japan would press on
into the hinterland of China with
even greater intensity than has been i
demonstrated In the past—knowing j
that American or the British were I
I
It has seemed to the writer that )
one of the questions we are going t
to have to answer before we get
through with determining just what
our foreign policy is goiue to be is.
"Am I My Brother's Keeper?" If
it were so simple a problem as to
merely order the withdrawal of our
troops from China and let the two
nations flçht it out, that would he
an easy matter. But that is not tin
case. We still have to keep in mind
what such nations as Russia. Italy
and Germany wTH do. And can we
fail to overlook the ultimate threat
that Japan, having conquered China,
would be to our own country in be-.
coining so formidable that she
not going to Interfere,
♦ *i *
would demand easing up of our tin
migration laws in order for her
people to come to
Continued on page 8
America— and,
$57,000 MONTHLY
IS GOVERNMENT'S
COUNTY SPENDING
Figure Includes Resettlement
Loans Made To
Farmers
Based on a survey made of WPA ;
expenditures in Sheridan county
during December, nearly $50,000 in
Works Progress funds is pouring in-1
to the county each month. Consul- |
erlng that Resettlement loans are I
not figured in this total, it is es- |
tlmated that nearly $57,000 is the
government's monthly outlay to
Sheridan residents.
The courthouse in Plentywood j
leads all projects with an estimated
monthly payroll of $20,000. Next is
the county-wide reclamation pro
gram, mostly dams, with about $16,
0O0 being spent, including equip
ment payments to persons operating
trucks.
The NY A payroll monthly is
about $1,600, Chris Johanson,
county director, said.
The Carrol dam, not included in
. the county-wide water projects, has
a monthly payroll of about $7,000,
also Including equipment payments.
The county road building program
brings about $2,000 to the county,
$800 is spent by the sanitation set
up and the sewing projects have a
payroll of $1210.
Adding the monthly payroll of ad
ministrative officers and office help
ers, the W!PA payroll nears the $50.
000 figure.
I
I
j
DAM STRUCTURES
ASSUMING SHAPE
MACHINE REPAIR HALTS WORK
AT PROJECT NE\R
RESERVE
County WPA dam projects con
tinued to progress this week under
Foreman Odegaard, ■ Mr, Odegaard
said Tuesday a minor machinery
accident forced suspension of work
on the Neiser dam. three miles
southeast of Reserve, the first of
the week when a rubber elevator on
the county mucker broke when ig
nited by gasoline. Repairs were be
ing ordered Tuesday by the county
commissioners, and work there,
where about 100 are employed, will
be resumed soon.
At the Carrol dam Project Fore
man Davis said the project is about
half completed. Workers continue
to haul fill from a hill above the
dam and the dam is rapidly assum
ing shape. Being built at a site re
miniscent of the gigantic
i structure at Fort Peck, the Carrol
i project will be used for both re
recreational activ
| äa'nVaVion and
earth
j A total of 262 men is working on
I county dam projects at the present,
Mr. Odegaard said Tuesday.
quisition sheet at the local WPA of
' fices estimated the pajyroll
county WPA dam workers, for the
period January 1 to 15 ,
$10,360.25.
A re
for
would be
Riprapping is the main construc
tion job now at the Peterson dam
1 near Dagmar, where the
j is nearly all in place.
earth fill
Plentywood Amateurs
Enter Final Contest
Three numbers from Plentywood
will be presented a- L the final radio
Wolf
contest New Year's eve
Point. Those who won the first three
at
places at Plentywood's tryout sev-;
oral weeks ago. and who will com
pete for first prize against repre
i sentatives from other northeastern
j Montana towns are Carol Storkan,
I the Slageberg Sisters and Robert
Hyink. Miss Storkan won first in
I the Plentywood contest.
) Vocal numbers wii, be rendered
t by Miss Storkan and Mr. Hyink and
the Stageberg Sisters are featured
in a song and dance number.
Winner of the contest New Year's
eve, which will be aired over KGCX,
Wolf Point, starting at 11 p in.,
"ill get a free tiCKet to New York
j for an audition with Major Bowes,
j The contest, in which only amateurs
compete, is sponsored by the Lib
erty theatre at Wolf Point in col
iaboratlon with Wolf Point busi
-
Here From Lake
Mrs. Willard French of Medicine
be-. Lake was visiting friends in Plenty
wood Monday. Her husband is em
ployed at the local soil conservation
offices, compiling
from
1 aerial photographs made of count.
acreage
und.
, » Busy Diplomat
*•»
%
, >
j
|
j
I
!
i
TOKYO . . . "Never a dull mo
ment.'' comment* American Am
bassedor Joseph C. Grew on dlplo
matic activities here since start of
the 6ino-Japanese "war" last Au
gust. Ambassador Grew transmit
ted the recent exchange of notes
of American protest aud Japanese
apology touched off by the sinking
of the gunboat Panay. tb .-«■•; pri
vately owned ships and killing and
wounding of American sailors aud
citizens, latest in a series wf "in
cidents" in the Far Bast. *
MERCURY DIPS.
LATER CLIMBS
WEATHER MAN GOES TEMPER
MENTAL TO GIVE VARIABLE
CLIMATE IN THIS AREA
Sheridan county and northeastern
Montana has experienced for
days the ultimate in changeable
I weather. Thermometers have plung
I ed from balmy recordings to ex
j trente cold and back to balm again
in rapid order.
O'
Thursday thermometers hung at
sub-zero readings. A quick change
setu the mercury scurrying upwards
and within a few hours, melting
temperatures were recorded. Friday
morning a sudden change sent the
mercury plunging downwards and
Saturday. Christmas day, it remain
ed cold.
Monday and Tuesday recordings
were moderate and Wednesdav a
general rise in temperature gave to
this area another taste, of mild
"' ealher -
Christmas day was coldest on re
cord here in many years. This area
generally experiences fairly moder
ate weather during that period.
Sudden changes from extreme
The Herald's maximum ami min
nimm thermometer recorded 10 tie
low zero earl.> Saturday morning.
Sunday night the cold wave broke,
and for several hours a mild wave
likened to a Chinook came to the
area.
cold to Chinooks have weather pro
! p hets and prognosticators guessing,
PRESIDENT'S BALL
Plans are being formulated to
I stage an annual Birthday Ball for
this
the President In Plentywood
1 year. P„ G. Neville, county.chairman
M Saturday,
of the birthday ball has announced
that committees to carry on plans
will be announc d ■ ,
The ball vvi
Jan. 29.
Cadet Peterson, Home from West
Point, felis of Academy Discipline
When asked if the F. S. Military
\cademy, West Point. N. Y.. is a>
"tough" on cadets as is the proval
ent opinion among civilians. Cadet
Richard Peterson, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Carl Peterson of Plentywood,
answered "tougher!"
day furlough.
at his
the Christmas
"Dich" spent four days
home here during
holidays, returning to the academy
last night. He was granted a teu
Cadet Peterson's remark "tough-j
er" didn't mean the West Point of
I (leers are viciously strict with new
| cadets for the "fun of it.'
I the policy of the corps—and "Dick"
likes it. U is a policy that has made
; this institution known as the great
est military school on earth. It
j makes men—or sends them home,
When a new class arrives at the
ivy sates of the academy they arc
stripped of all possessions except
personal belonging . Ear; plein- is.
1 outfitted with clothes from under-1
wear out.
poor, distinguished or humble, they
get the same medicine, and not all
"can take it."
It is
and for the next four
irch or
years they are all submitted to the
strict regime of the army
"Dick" was appointed early in
1936 by Senator Wheeler, and en
tei>-d the academy in June of tha
In each das 1 -
GROUP DISCUSSES
MEDICAL PLAN IN
SESSION IN CITY
Committee Appointed To
Consider Matter; Legal
Points are Weighed
A Group of Sheridan residents,
mostly farmers, met last Thursdaj
chambers at the courthouse and vot
ajternoon in the Commissioners'
e l unanimously to approve the soci
alized medical plan being sponsored.
About 70 attended the session.
I County Commissioners A, J. Olson
! and Andrew Christensen also were
i present.
Gonious Laursen was elected
chairman of the meeting and called
on Olaf Aasheim, county superin
tendent of schools, to outline the
plan to the group. Aasheim review
ed the plan since it was first brought
to public attention in the county.
Dr. J. C. Storkan, in addressing
a group, expressed the opinion that
It woul drequire from $35,000 to
$40,000 to put the county-wide plan
In operation and include hospital
ization, which he felt would be es
sential to make the proposal work
out entirely satislactorily. It would
also, he sated, require the services
of at least three doctors.
I
Open discussion was held on the
subject aud the group voted down
an amended plan to provide hos
pitalization and medical care for
school students only by unanimously
endorsing the plan to include all
residents of the county, the money
to be raised bv a 2 mill lev\.
*
The principal question seemed to
he as to just how the plan could be
set up in the county in order that
j Us operation could meet all legal
j tests. Supporters, however, seemed
confident all legal barriers could be
removed. Questions which arose
(■*"*srt: since expenses for next year's
; tax income had already been sot,
how could it now be revised to put
the plan in operation? If different
j
j
j
1
[
the mon
„„ . __., . j, ,
e> in providing the free medical
ald? Would the propo8ed 2-miii
a levv actually provide the necessarv
to funds to insure free lnedical aid t0
j everv resid ent of the county' And
would district school officers or
j countv commissioners have the 1( , ç .
al riRht to lev lhis additional tax
;l g a j ns t property?
i '
;
j school districts were to levy and
co ]] ec t separately the 2-nilll levy, to
whom would the money be paid and
j nto w hat county fund would It go?
\yh 0 WO uld be charged with the
j responsibility of spending
A committee was appointed by
i Mr. Laursen to meet with the com
, missioners and seek to make the
pian operative during 1938. On the
c mmittee are Henr Haaven. Coal
'd d go; John Shoal, John -Tun fated,
1 Dagmar; Charles Grant. Outlook;
Mrs. John Carroll and Geo. Wess
ner.
to
The commissioners were
next Monday to consider th
sal, at which time the committee
nam-.-d by chairman Laursen "as to
e its report.
an et
to
pro
ed throughout the nation and
s. possessions by Senators, at
, urge, from the national guard and
. gular army, by congressmen, and
;om sons of veterans killed in for

■ i -■, wars.
Next summer Cadet I'etrson will
ue awarded a 10-weeks' furlough,
Ho plans to spend more time at his
home theft,
WJien "Dick" graduates—lie has
i two and one-half years left—he will
he commissioned as a second lieut
enant In the F. S. \riny. He says
pursue after graduatin'-'
:
in 1 ? issued from the county
is.
sor. will be -old for 75c.
hide ma> !)•■ driven unde- this li
cense, as was the case with the 50c
: licenses lust
O.iiv
depart mem
j is aviation, which he will probably
his
military
favorite
All Drivers' Licenses
Will Sell For 75 Centb
Drivers' licenses for 1938 are he
trea
r s office this week.
» alike last year, when the 11
i censes sold for 25c and 50c
finer for persons driving
their own cars—al! licenses this sea
the
onl - v
Any ve-j
:
yea r.
leisons ovot 16 years
1
-
se lien.
\
s. it wa-*
!>urci
^•d out.
.
- 4
Public Was Breaking
Poscu's Water Pump
So Now It Is Locked
didn't mind people
quenching their Sunday thirst j
at his well, but when they broke |
the pump that watered them,
time and attain, he had to lock it (
I'oscu
up.
That was the sad fact that met
water-carriers the first of the* |
week who for several months have |
been using the excellent well wat
er in back of the Elgin cafe, op- |
perated by Jim and Poscu Popes- |
cu. Seared steel plainly shows ;
where the pump handle has been '
welded after it had been broken
by spinach eaters. So now, alas, ! a
the red water dragger sits unused,
a cold blue chain holding down 1
the pump. And a padlock holding !
to
Maybe the Popescu boys will 1
reopen it for public consumption |
when milder weather sets in, and
people aren't in such an all-fired
rush to pump a pailful and "git." ;
—-!
together the chain!
SERVICES TODAY
FOR GILBERTSON
PIONEER COUNTY RESIDENT TO
BE BURIED AT
OUTLOOK
Last rites for Karl Gilbertson,
I well-known Outlook and Archer
farmer who died Christinas eve at |
, ,
Minot, N. D., will be said by Rev. j
O. A. Schmidt at the Plentywood
i
Lutheran church this afternoon,
Thursday. Mr. Gilbertson, who came
to Montana In 1907, died at the
Trinity hospital In the North Dak
ota city December 24 of cancer.
He had been confined there for
some lime preceding his death.
Mr. Gilberts««^ was hörn in Nor
way October 27, 1 871. After arriv
ing in this country when 17 years
old he journeyed to Minnesota, and
j 30 years ago came to Sheridan
county. Soon a f tev eo'Tr. the
county he found employment on the |
Judd Malkin ranch and later home-1
!
j
j
steaded on a tract near Archer. For
several years previous to his death
lie lived south of Outlook.
In December, 1911, he was mar
ried to Nora Carlsen, Rev. Fretheim
saying the vows. His wife preceded
him in death.
. . , .
, Mr. Gilbertson is survived by an
, , , .
I adopted daughter, Norma, of Plenty
wood; one brother. Peder of Honey
fold ; N - and *« ur sis , ® r8 ' * r8 '
stad,,iau of Lau Cla re ' Uls - : Mrs -
Ilodllgos ' Minneapolis; and two
. | ^^ers in Norway,
M , r ' , (,ilber ® on , wl " b,,ried at
outlook, beside the remains of Ins
wife.
V
j
Here 23 to 21
It took many years Ini)
finally
a basketball victor,' over Wil
IJslon.
Las! night at the high school
gym the local Wildcats rallied
to nose oui the visitors,
Ml, in a thrilling game,
ton led most of the way hut
fell before th<' rugged Plenty
wood defense and the sliarp
slioollng of Captain Fiske.
"■beehaii and Moline were the
outstanding performers for the
Coyotes.
to
PlentyWDod has
scon d
.
to
Willis
at
AWAITING MATERIALS
COURTHOUSE WORKERS
Work was suspended on t he|
courthouse in Plentywood pending
arrival of equipment,
) ho here the end of the week. Time
keeper Ernie Stewart said the men
who have not completed their two
"•«•el;s period will probably unload
the building equipment "•hen it ar
rives. The new shift hnutarv 1 to
15—will begin work Juu
Courthouse Foreman
ire was railed tu Chin - . Monday!
business.
expecled to
li- ,. v i denC e.t.
50c
ary 3.
Ham
Site
.. annual'®'
t I i,e msored it
T-Tid r
\ J Thuneiu returned Tuesday
j
on
I IKI.MEV- I'll '.
The s'ago is
firetuen's dance
the city auditorium here
night. New Year's eve.
The ball will be the 24th annual
11
staged h> the local fire
- v 1 department. It will be a carnival
affair and from present indications,
ve-j t jj e UiU i a i packed ball room will be
'event as
I
FROM HILLINGS
ÎÜ
CITY INDUSTRIAL
ACTIVITY NOTED
FOR YEAR ENDING
Many New Enterprises Es
tablished in Plentywood
In 1937
-
The year 1937. nearly past, saw
much industrial activity in Plenty
wood. Many business establishments
transferred locations and several
new structures were completed and
others started,
a building boom in the city next
year, due to the scarcity of suitable
homes, a boom which will be stimu
lated by a federal program expected
to be passed by the next session of
congress soon after the first of the
year.
Headlining building construction
the past year was the beginning of
work on the new Sheridan county
courthouse on the north end of
Main street in Plentywood.
courthouse two weeks ago was es
timated to be one-fourth completed.
The structure is being built as a
WPA project.
Soon after the first of the year
the Deck's bakery and apartments
were completed and fixtures and
equipment were moved in from ac
ross the street. "Dinty" Moore last
summer opened a pool hall in the
building abandoned by the Deck
concern.
The Farmers Union Oil company
Observers predict
The
|
, opened a filling station and bulk
j
The
plant in the city last spring,
i company's interests
operated
here by Ted Hansen. Fred Wendt
the first month of 1 937 assumed
are
|
management of the Westland Oil
station a block east of Main street.
The station was built last winter.
Plentywood restaurants remodel
! led their establishments during the
year, the City cafe opening spacious
banquet rooms in the spring and the
Elgin rearranging fixtures about the
same period. Elmer Gooder assumed
management of lit« confecilouarv
j formerly owned by Carl West, re
j naming the place Midget Cafe.
"Pud" Marsh began operating the
renovated Kavon garage in October,
also installing gasoline pumps. The
Continued on page 4
-
DAM EASEMENTS
WILL BE PUSHED
PREVAILING
CAUSE OF DELAY IN FIRST
WORK ON PROJECT
TECHNICALITIES
Plans went forward today to hast
en as much as possible sccurance
[of easements un land In the Red
I stone territory directly affected by
; the proposed Big Mu ■ I cl >
I project.
: At the regular \\ < in?
I luncheon of the
I dub, methods t
I the easement not 8 were discus,sod.
John Albers V». ud Judd .Malkin, both
and meniiiers of a county
; -ommittee to carry on ihe easement
j work, were present at the session,
li was learned that slight delays
, have been evidenced due to Inability
to secure proper plats in whim to
work.
A plan was suggested that when
easements are secured, includ
'd should l)i adjacent lands sur
roundin ; iho proposed reservoir to
i ilUiiU'- from un> difficulties which
. ma> arise from the standpoint of
I trespassing and also for recreallon
I al purposes. The plan was suggested
Sen. Lars Ang'lck, of Reserve.
Following completion of minor
details, work of securing g.v ernenn
will get under way.
;atlon
lr r
I,
- noon
1 Lions
Plein.' vv.
sic in on.
jf Uedatoiu
carry on the
I the
i.>
he|
|
I COUNTY TO PAY 8
OUTSTANDING BONDS
Sheridan county Tuesday made
preparations for paying $8,000 in
outstanding bonds under
plan
adopted more than a year ago when
outstanding bonds of this county
wore refunded.
a
The bonds called
were drawn by lottery. A board con
sisting of A. J. Olson, chairman of
I the board of county commissioners;
Christensen, county treasurer
it ' and Vernon Hoven, county attorney,
conducted the lottery.
j Numbers of all outstanding bonds
j were put together and correspond
| iug numbers of eight bonds were
I drawn. The bonds are of the tbou
i sand dollar variety.
The lottery plan of conducting
I payment was agreed upon by bond
j ho! lers when the refinancing pro
1 gram was adopted.
' Bonds called at this time were
numbers 56. ST. 197, 2^0. 21S. 221,
j 271, 4 82.
for
payment
be

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