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The Ronan pioneer. [volume] (Ronan, Mont.) 1910-1970, June 11, 1915, Image 2

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THE RONAN PIONEER
Issued every Friday at Ronan, Missoula County,
Montana, by
E. H. RATHBONE,
Publisher.
ADVERTISING RATES
Space rates on application.
Reading notices 10 cents per line each insertion.
Church and society notices charged for at regular
rates in cases where profit is the object.
Legal advertising at state rates.
Ronan, Mont., June 11, 1915.
William Jennings Bryan
Mr. Bryan's resignation as sec
retary of state will be most
heartily approved;by his sincere
friends from a personal stand
standpoint, and should be as
deeply regretted by the people
of the United States as a nation.
Mr. Bryan is an advocate of
peace and could not consistently
remain as secretary of state and
do the bidding of a president
whose course of. action is leading
the country toward a partici
pation in the world war.
Mr. Bryan's political enemies
have never missed an oppor
tunity to belittle him in the eyes
of the people and from the be
ginning of the trouble caused by
the European war the subsidized
press of the United States have
continually and extensively called
attention to the fact that Presi
dent Wilson had himself taken
charge of the affairs of state
carrying the imputation that Mr.
Bryan was incompetent and occu
pying a position too large for
him. His resignation explains
why the president was in entire
charge of the situation. Mr.
Bryan believed the course adopt
ed by the president would lead
this country into the European
war. He was too honest and
sincere to do the bidding of an
other against his own beliefs and
convictions, therefore the matter
was turned over to his superior
-in office.
Advocates of peace deplore the
fact that Secretary Bryan's anti
war policy was not adopted by
the administration. We believe
that ninety yer cent of the peo
ple of the United States are most
decidedly opposed to this country
being hauled into the European
war. We have nothing to gain
and everything to lose.
The future will tell whether 1
Mr. Bryan or whether the gentle
man whom Mr. Bryan made
president, was right.
When you speak a good word
for your town, you speak two
for yourself.
Why this man bought a
Remington Junior
Typewriter
"I have been investigating several of
the recent makes of machines, seeking
for one of simple construction for ordi
nary manuscript and letter writing. I
was nearly ready to buy a machine of
another make when I just happened to
see for the first time the Remington
Junior, and found it to be the very thing
I wanted.
The man who wrote this is the postmaster of a small
Southern town. He is only one of thousands who have
recently bought a Remington Junior. But his reasons
apply to everybody-they apply to YOU.
The Remington Junior is our latest product and the
latest idea in typewriting.
It is strictly a high-grade machine.
It has the Remington Name, the Remington Guar
antee, the Remington Quality-everything Remington
except weight and bulk.
A "Simplified Remington" describes it exactly. //
And its price is $50.00 /
Remington Junior Typewriters will be sent "on examina
tion," without obligation to purchase. Re/ Tminton
/ Typewriter
Easy payment terms can be arranged if desired. / Company
/ Please send me
your illustrated
S•a / descriptive booklet
Remington Typewriter / on the Remington
Junior Typewriter.
Syou send me a Reming
SomIau hall be gl to have
mpany / ton Junior Ty ewriter on
, / itexamination. This request
crporate) / dnot obligate me to pur
/ chase.
105 West Broadway /
Butte, Mont. /
I./
For the past few weeks advo
cates of a more powerful navy
have been springing up on every
hand, and the country seems to
' be ralmost unanimously of the
opinion now that greater defens
ive measures should be taken.
But while we are agitating for a
big navy let us not overlook the
fact that when war finally comes
it is the army that does the bulk
- of the fighting. Nations are like
dogs-the big one with the sharp
teeth gets the bone, while the
little fellow gets licked. The
army represents the teeth of the
nation, and if they be blunted its
fighting qualities are reduced to
a minimum. Give us an army
as well as a navy.
EXPORTS OF COTTON
DECREASE 50 PER CENT
Wheat and Flour Nearly Tre
bled In Last Fiscal Year.
Washington.-The value of American
cotton exports has been cut in half and
the shipments of wheat and flour have
nearly trebled during the eight months
of the present fiscal year, ending with
February, which period embraces the
first seven months of the European
war, when compared with the corre
sponding period of the year before.
The value of the cotton exports for
the eight month period ending with
last February was $243,000,000 against
$498,000,000 for the same months of
the year previous, showing a loss of
$255,000,000. The wheat and flour ex
ports jumped from $100,200,000 to
$288,000,000, a gain of $181,800,000.
Meat and dairy products gained only
$11,000,000, increasing from $102,700,
000 to $114,300,000. The value of
horses showed a big gain in compari
son with the year before, the increase
being from $1,800,000 to ý32,G00,000.
A comparison of the value of the prin
cipal exports during the eight months
of the 1914 fiscal year and the 1915
fiscal year, the Iatter period embracing
the first seven months of the war, as
furnished by the burei ii of foreign and
domestic commerce, is as follows:
Commodity. 1.114. 1915.
Cotton ...................$19,0) 0,000 $21.10.0(o00
Wheat and flour........ 100,200.000 208,000,000
Meat and dairy prod
ucts .................. 102,70),000 111.,30,000 1
Hor.es ................. 1,800,000 32,600,000
Cotton manufactures.. 34.,800,000 42,700,000
Harness and saddles... 1,600,000 17,100,000)
Cars and carriages, all 33.500.000 31,700,000
Chemicals, drugs, etc.. 17,500,000 22,00,000
Upper leather .......... 14.,..0,000 20,800.000
Explosives ............... 4,100,000 12,300,000
Cottonseed oil .......... 9,200,000 12,100,000
Commercial automo
biles ................ 800,000 14,100,000
Boots, shoes, slippers.. 12,300,000 12,100,000
Woollen manufactures. 3,100,000 17.400,000
Sole leather ............. 4,700,000 14.600,000
Refined sugar .......... 1,300,000 19,600,000
Mules .................. 500,000 3,900,000
Copper and mlanufac
tures ................... 96,00,000 58,00 00,000
Lumber and wood
manufactures ........ 08,400,000 32,000,000
Agricultural i m p 1e -
ments .................. 20,800,000 4.000,000 1
Mineral oils ............. 99,700,000 85,000,000
Naval stores ....... ... 13,00.000 6,300.000
Passenger automobiles 14,900,000 7,600,000
Coal ...................... 42,200,000 35,300,000
Iron and steel manu
factures ............... 171,600.000 121,300,000
Electrical machinery... 17,700,000 12,300,000
Tobacco and manufac
tures ................. 43,100,000 32,300,000
ALLIES REFUSE TO
ACCEPT ORLEANS
Duke Has Tried to Enlist In
Various Armies.
The French government has refused
the request of the Duke of Orleans that
he receive permission to enlist in the
Foreign legion under an assumed
name. The pretender to the throne of
France is practically a man without a
country, and none of the allied nations
will accept him as a soldier.
Early in the war the duke sought to
have amended the law passed in 1886
THE DUKE OF ORLEANS.
forbidding him to enter France or serve
in the army. He offered to resume his
exile later if he were permitted to tight.
After the French refused to accept
his services as a soldier the duke
sought to enlist in the British, Bel
gian and Russian armies, but the mili
tary authorities of those countries, out
of courtesy to the French government,
refused to accept him.
iIe then appealed to Premier Viviant
for the right to enter the Foreign le
sion, but the premier held that such a
:top was impracticable, for he would
be sure to be recognized, and the gov
nrnment would be compelled to expel
him from France under the law direct
od against members of former French
reigning families. The duke's home is
in England.
TROUBLOUS TIMES IN CHINA.
It Is Threatened With a 'Revolution
While Dealing With Japan.
The publication of an alleged inter
i view with President Yuan Shih Kai of
China, in which he was quoted as in
dicating that assurances had been gir
en by the United States to the Chinese
government that the great war would
not affect the integrity of the Chinese
nation, has recently attracted much at
tention in official circles in Washing
ton. The particular expression of the
is
THE MIKADO OF JAPAN (UPPEE) AND YTUAN
sIIHI KAI.
chlief executive of the Chinese republic
that excited the most interest iln gov
irnment circles was this:
"We have received formal communil
cntions by mail confirmning cable dis
patches received somle weeks ago in
which the e Washlngton authorities as
sure us that Japan does not intend any
aggression."
luan Shib Kai has had internal trou
bles besides his difficult foreign vela
tions with Japan. Dr. Sun Yat Sen,
the southern political leader, who was
the first provisional president of the
Chinese republic, has begun to be ac
tive again and has been denounced in
a mandate, signed by President Yuan
Shlb KaL
! ------ - m-----m
TO END ALL WARS
BY A WORLD COURT
Supreme Tribunal For Settling
International Disputes,
Ways and means for establishing a
"supreme court of the world" for set
tling international disputes and avoid
ing war will be discussed at a congress
of representatives of peace societies,
educational institutions, chambers of
commerce and civic organizations, to
be held in Cleveland, O., May 12, 13
and 14. Announcement of the plans
for the congress was made by the
world court committee, composed of
100 prominent citizens, including the
governors of most of the states.
"It is not the thought of the commit
tee nor the purpose of the congress to
deal with the present war situation."
JOHN HAYS HAMMOND.
says the committee's announcement.
"The movement contemplates tile es
tablishment of judicial machinery at
the close of the war as.the one neces
sary means of preventing future wars.
"Its exceptional character is found in
the fact tlatt is not a peace congress.
Peace is the ultimatum, but the object
or the congress will be thoroughly to
discuss and decide upon the organiza
tion of the peace sentiment of the
world into a l)practical and rational
method of securing peace. The con
gress will devote itself to the method
indorsed at the last Hague conference
and reafirmied by the committee of
one hundred-namely, the judicial set
tlement of international disputes.
which procedure necessitates the or
ganization of a world court."
John HIays HInimond is chairman of
the committee. aland among those who
have accepted invitations to speak at
the congress ale former i'resident Taft.
Governor Willis of Ohio. Alton H. Par
ker. Senator IIarding of Ohio and Sen
ator Sherman of Illinois.
John Hays Hamiomll is peculiarly
well fitted for his position of c.hairman
by 'rea;son of his practical business
sense. his diplomlatic tempierament and
his personail anequlintalnce with most
of the rulers of the world.
HANDS ACROSS THE CHANNEL.
Tommy Atkins Has Leisure Moments
From His Serious Work In France.
There are little incidenlts in war that
hlave a human interest besides thie ter
rible records of carnage that arle her
aided abroad. Every now and then a
photographer snaps a picture that tells
Photo by American Press Association.
FRENCH PEASANT GIRL SELLING SWEETS
TO ENGLISH SOLDIERBS.
Its own story and one that perhaps
would not appeal to the regular news
paper correspondent. In the illustra
tion a little French peasant girl is sell
tng sweets to a party of British sol
i us, ~ust an illunainntg 'sidelight
upon Tommy Atklns at play in France
Are You Going to Build?
A house, barn, grainary, shed, or anything requiring
lumber? If you are, yon will need us. Remember,
we are the originators of low prices on building ma
terials on the Flathead, and continue the low price.
We manufacture and sell the very best in all kinds of
building mateial, in the rough or finished product.
Home Labor and Home Material
Our planer is turning out seasoned flooring, siding,
ceiling, shiplap, mouldings, frames, etc. Doors and
windows of all kinds. For estimates, prices, etc., see
Ronan Milling Company
Mill five miles northeast of Ronan
SESSION LAWS
1915
CERTIFIED BY SECRETARY OF STATE
FOURTEENTH
LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY
The Independent Publishing Company, State Printers, have the Session
Laws of the 1915 session ready for delivery. They are bound in sheep and
the index prepared by the state law librarian has been carefully checked
by attorneys who have worked on the codes and session laws for years,
thereby making the 1815 laws as published by The Independent, the most
carefully indexed of any edition issued. This book is bound in genuine law
sheep and sent prepaid on receipt of $3.00.
Independent Publishing Company
STATE PRINTERS, HELENA, MONTANA
Stove Wood prices
Deliverd in Ronan
Dead wood, 3 ricks for............ $5.00
Green seasoned wood, per rick... 2.00
In the Timber
Dead wood, per rick................ $1.25
Green seasoned wood, per rick... 1.50
Yard east of Burland's blacksmith
shop. Wood always on hand.
Phone No. 374.
HOUK & HAY
YOU ARE NOT co;NG IF ITS THe REAL
DOWN THERE FOR
THAT POUCH I To6AC0C CHEW:
DROPPED. YOU JUST LET I AM
MAN you are not alone in your de
sire for a clean, small chew that
will give you tobacco satisfaction.
That's why men are glad to find the
Real Tobacco Chew. Satisfies you better
and lasts longer. So it's natural for
men to tell each other about the merits
of the Real Tobacco Chew.
A little chew of pure, rich, mellow tobacco-seasoned'
and sweetened just enough-cuts out so much of the
grinding and spitting.
THE REAL TOBACCO CHEW IS NOW CUT TWO WAYSII
SWB CUT IS LONG stIRE. RIGHT-CUT IS SHORT SHRED
Take less than one-quarter the old size chew. It
will be more satisfying than a mouthful of ordinary
tobacco. Just take a nibble of it until you find the
strength chew that suits you, then see how easily and
evenly the real tobacco taste comes, how it satisfies,
how much less you have to spit, how few chews you
take to be tobacco satisfied. That's why it is The
Real Tobacco Chew. That's why it costs less in the end.
The taste of pure, rich tobacco does not need to be covered up. An
oexces of licorice and sweetening makes you spit too much.
is Notice bow the salt brings
out the rleb tobacco taste. 9 )
WEYMAN.BRUTON COMPANY
iSo UnIon WNew Ar
SiWiY F EiQMJ3TAR E: END' IQýSTAMPS'TOVr
J. B. BEAR
Watchmaker and Jeweler
Repairing of all Kinds
I sell Dark Chaser Gas Lanterns
and Lights
Ronan : : Montana
WILLIAMS STAGE LINE
Ravalli to Poison
FARE Ravalli to Ronan $1.50
Ronan to Poison $1.00
GEO. W. WILLIAMS, Manager.

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