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Tonopah daily bonanza. [volume] (Tonopah, Nev.) 1906-1929, March 25, 1911, Image 1

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TonoIah Daily Bonanza
WEATHER
Fair Tonight and
Sunday
Today's Silver
Quotation 52 1-2
VOL. IX. NO 130
TONOPAH, NEVADA, SATURDAY EVENING. MARCH 25, 1911.
PRICE 10 CENTS.
MUCH ACTIVITY
ONOPAH'S PAilOUS NINES
N
DEPART FOR .
OLD ENGLAND
KELLY BROTHERS MAY RETURN
TO U. S. WITH CORNISH
BRIDES.
Fred and Jim Kelly who, to
gether with their brother 'Albert,
are the proprietors of the Belmont
bar, on Main street, departed this
morning for PenSilva, Cornwall,
England, ostensibly to pay a visit to
their parents, who are both living,
hale and hearty, and are upwards
of 7 years of age. Rumor, how
ever, has it that the Kelly boys
are Journeying to the old country
to return with buxom lassies to the
land o their adoption. This rumor
may be incorrect, but when asked
the question point blank, Brother
Albert simply winked knpwlrfgly.
The Kelly brothers are among the
oldest of the inhabitants of Tono-
pah, having lighted here during the
days of Jim Butler, many years ago
All have made several trips to the
native heath to visit the "old folks
at home." This time, however, Al
bert, who has his wife and family
in Tonopah, stays behind to take
care of the business Interests of the
three brothers. Several months will
elapse before the return of the wan
derers to Tonopah.
E. A. FRITSCH
IS DISMISSED
BY JUDGE
The suit brought by the Tono
pah Sewer and Drainage company
against A. E. Fritseh, proprietor of
the A-B-C saloon, was dismissed
today by Judge H. H. Atkinson
One of the witnesses called by the
prosecution admitted that he had
pulled the sack in the sewer com
pany's pipe while in the employ of
iruscn; nowever, the question as
to whether he did so under instruc
Lions or oi nis own violation was
the point on which the decision
mingled. It now looks as though a
corporation has no legal status in
this man's town of Tonopah.
FORMER TONOPAH WOMAN
IS DEAD AT MANHATTAN
Mrs. May Young, for many years
a resident of Tonopah, died at Man
hattan early this morning. Mrs.
Young came to this section of Ne
vada from New York state in the
early days, and was well known
around the early camp and the lat
ter city. She has a sister residing
in Denver, Colorado.
TONOPAH NEWS COMPANY
IS UP-TO-DATE CONCERN
The Tonopah News and Stationery
company is now moved to its new
quarters just below the new post
office and has put in a fine new line
of goods. The best of candles, a
complete line of sporting goods and
magazines, newspapers and books of
every description. A visit to this
store is well worth the time, as
there is .undoubtedly some article
carried in stock that is needed by
everyone.
CARRIE NATION IS
IN SERIOUS PLIGHT
LEAVENWORTH, Kan., March
25. Mrs. Carrie Nation, the mill
tant Kansas temperance worker, who
is at a sanitarium here, is gradual
ly growing weaker. Her condition,
which is due to a general break
down, is regarded as serious. None
of her mail is given her, but is
forwarded to a daughter In Kansas
City, who is managing her mother's
business affairs.
CASINO TONIGHT.-
Remember the Harem Skirt dance
tonight. Don't fail to see Agnes in
"The Gibson Girl" act or the pic
tures which will be shown every
hour.
HUBERT GUTHRIE
PASSES AWAY
OF PNEUMONIA
Hubert Guthrie passed away at the
Miners' hospital at 8-: 30 o'clock last
night after a few days' illness with
pneumonia. The dead man was but
19 years of age and was one of the
best-liked youths of his age in the
entire "city of Tonopah. The father
of young Guthrie arrived in Tono
pah, from Hazen yesterday afternoon
in time to be at the bedside of his
dying boy. Besides the father, Mr.
Guthrie is survived by a mother and
young sister. Funeral services will
be held from the Presbyterian
church at 2 o'clock tomorrow after
noon, , under the auspices of the
Miners' union.
LEAVE ON HONEYMOON.
Justice Lee Davis united in mar
riage yesterday afternoon Henry
Barrett of Millers, Nev., and Mrs
Orpha Reynolds of Detroit, Mich.,
at his office in the city hall. The
newly married couple left last
night on a honeymoon trip to Pro-
vo, Utah. Reno Journal.
VOLUNTEERS
MASS MEETING
FOR MONDAY
BOYS ARE ANXIOUS FOR 11USL
NESS TO SHOW
INTEREST.
A mass meeting of the volunteer
fire department is called for 8
o'clock Monday evening in the gym
nasium and it will be well for all
the business men of Tonopah who
can possibly spare the time, to be
on hand and help devise a way
that new interest will be taken
in the department. .
From past experience the prop
erty owners of Tonopah know wna;
the volunteers have done, and can
readily realize what may happen
should the department have to dis
band. The business men whq help to
comuose the volunteer fire denart-
ment and in whom it rests to elect
officers that they can feel confident
will lake care of the affairs, have
been negligent in their duty, and
the ltsult is 'that the department
today is without anyone in charge
and the affairs gradually shaping
to a
point where the department;
must disband.
,- The holdings of the volunteers are
the fully equipped gymnasium and
a first-class ball park. These have
cost the department about $10,000,
all paid excepting $321.
This small debt of $321 can be
paid off by the volunteers in a' few
months if a set of, officers are elect
ed who will arouse the old spirit
again.
The records show that, with in
terest taken during last summer,
the debt of the department was low
ered over $500 in the course of
a couple of months.
If the business men will show the
proper interest to be on hand Mon
day evening the boys will do the
rest.
4
ORE SHIPMENTS
OF PAST WEEK
During the past week 8259
tons of ore was shipped from
Tonopah and the surround
ing mining section, carry
Jng a total value of $206,
475. The shipments -were
as follows:
Properties. ' Tons.
Tonopah Mining 3500
Belmont 2100
Montana-Tonopah 1035
Tonopah Extension.... 995
West End 500
MacNamara 50
Midway .' 80
;
Fresh
Market.
milk and cream
at Palace
12-12-tf
Weekly Report From
of Tonopah Shows the Vast Progress
Being Made Tonnage Handled and
Values Realized.
In the erection of new machin
ery, in; the footage made and' In
values, the past week is one that
might well bear the caption of
"banner" in the mining history of
Tonopah and vicinity. Considerable
machinery has been placed, or is
still being placed, in several of the
smaller mines which will be run
ning full, blast within the near fu
ture. . All of this machinery is of
the most approved model and will
tend towards the upbuilding of the
mining property of this section.
Belmont
During the week the . machinery
which comprises the timber framer
and mill has been moved from the
Desert Queen shaft to the 'new Bel
mont shaft and is now in active and
successful operation. The ore sort
ing belts have also been brought to
the new shaft and placed in position
and a force of men put to work sort
ing ore. Only one shift is at pres
ent employed, but another one will
be put to work in the immediate fu
ture. When running up to capacity
for two shifts the ore sorting plant
keeps about 24 or more men on the
jump, so with the other men who
are employed in various occupations
about the surface of trie Beknont
the company keeps a small army of
laborers engaged in service above
ground. With these and with the
number employed in the mine's un
aergrouna workings the company
now sustains a pay-roll reaching
pretty close to the 300 mark. And
when is added the number that is
employed at the mill at Millers, it is
at once apparent what a potent fae
tor the Belmont company is to the
wage-earners of the State.
At the company's new shaft every
thing Is now running in splendid
shape and the cages are constantly
employed In the hoisting of ore.
The last week 2100 tons of ore were
raised, the .largest amount that has
been taken from the mine since be
rore tne disaster or a month ago
and 500 tons more than was hoisted
at the last report.
In the mine nothing of a startling
or sensational character has devel
oped during the week. The ore is
maimainmg unirorm wiatn ana
value- though the high-grade streaks
heretofore noted come and go as us
ual and add very materially to the
company's revenue
On the main ledge on the 900-foot
level the hanging-wall drift is pro
" "l
nod I r Or -! ar K fnit rtr rP n
splendid mining grade, while
the
stopes above are furnishing a small
amount of smelting ore In addition
t their usual quota of a milling
character.
1000-foot level The east drift on
the hanging-wall branch of the vein
at this level shows 5 feet of quartz
in the face, though here and there
small bunches of waste material are
encountered, but though this con
tains little or no value the whole
mass is broken down and shipped to
the mill. The drift is now at a point
which corresponds vertically with
the low-grade stuff which appeared
on the 1100 level, but which, when
It was passed through, led to con
siderably higher values, so by the
same token it is likely that when the
face on the 1000 is driven a few feet
to the east the values will materially
increase. From the stdpes on this
level the usual tannage is being se
cured and it is keeping up to stand
ard as far as values are concerned.
At the 1056 winze' on this level, at
the bottom of which the late disas
trous fire occurred, a new hoist and
motor of 50 h. p. has been installed.
It was at first believed that the hoist
which went through the flames could
by a little repairing be again util
ized, but examination proved it to be
in bad shape, so it was deemed ex
pedient to install a new one. The
winze at this point and clear down
to the 1166 has been retimbered, and
it is now in as good shape as ever. .
1100-foot level The face of the
east drift on this level shows 5 feet
of low-grade ore that Is, low for
the Belmont but it is not so devoid
of values that it fails to make a good
milling product. The stopes above
the level, both to the east and west
All the Properties
of the new Belmont shaft, continue
in a splendid grade of ore and are
supplying their customary tonnage.
Work still continues in the cross
cuts that are being sent out from
this level, but there has been no
change of note.
1166-foot level The drift on the
hanging-wall branch of-the vein is
being driven to the east on this level
and shows a 5-foot face of excellent
ore. The stopes above the level are
producing a small tonnage, but it is
oof splendid grade and adds very1
materially to the product of the
mine.
The new shaft has now reached a
depth 130 feet below the 1100-foot
station, and is making at the rate of
about 4 feet per day. Below the
1100, except for the manway, the
shaft is bulkheaded and will be kept
so until a station is established at
the 1200. This will be done in the
next few weeks and connection made
with the 1166 level, thereby facili
tating the method of drawing ore
from that section of the mine.
TonopaH-Mining
With a full force of miners at
work and no loss of time occasioned
by breaks in the power line, as was
noted last week and which caused a
cessation of operations for nearly
three days, the Tonopah Mining Co.
was permitted the past week to bring
production up to the usual maximum
and the report from the mill Shows
that the output compares very favor
ably with any that has been made
the current year.
In the several mines of the com
pany's estate the number of feet of
development reached the standard
that has been maintained the past
few months, and more than doubled
that of the previous week. In all
452 feet of work was accomplished
divided as follows: Mizpah 196 feet
Red Plume 51 feet, Silver Top
204 feet. Probably in the three
working mines the best showing for
the week was made in the Silver Top
where, on the 440-foot level, a de
cided improvement has been noticed
in the size of the veins and the qua!
ity of the ore. It will also be noted
from the mine's report that the
faulted section of the Desert Queen
vein has been caught up with, and
at the point of connection, on the
hanging-wall of the fault, a foot of
good milling ore has been encoun
tered. Drifting is now being pushed
on this ore and fayorable results are
anticipated.
In all the company's mines the us
ual amount of stoplng obtains, and in
almost all of the new workings there
is every evidence that the veins are
growing stronger and that they are
becoming more productive. This
fact is especially noticeable on the
300 of the Mizpah, where work Is be
ing vigorously pushed on the Burro
vein, and at this point it shows bet
ter and stronger in every respect.
On the Red Plume, between the
600- and 700-foot levels, an inter
mediate level has been established,
and from this stopes will be started.
The vein at this point shows consid
erable space between the walls and
the ore is of an excellent grade.
The report from the mill for the
week ending March 20 shows that
98 out of the 100 stamps were drop
ping constantly, crushing 3400 tons
of ore of an average of $20.50 per
ton. The. shipment of bullion con
sisted of 48 bars, valued at $42,000.
and 31 tons of concentrates, valued
at $18,000, making the total ship
ments for the week amount to $60s
000. An extraction of 91 per cent
was recorded. The amount of ore
received at the mill from the mine
for the week totaled 3500 tons.
The diamond drill is still operat
ing on the west end of the Red
Plume, but no announcement has yet
been made of what is being accom
plished.
Tonopah Extension
Eleven bars weight 1400 pounds,
and having an approximate value of
$14,700 was the result of the To
nopah Extension's clean-up for the
first half of the month of March.
(Continued, on Page Three.)
MANHATTAN
BIG FOUR IS A
BIG PRODUCER
P. O. (Slim) Harris of Manhattan
is in Tonopah for a few days and
is telling of the rich developments
in the Pine Tree camp. Mr. Har
ris was one of the original loca
tors in Manhattan and has seen
Manhattan in the days of prosperity
and adversity, i lie stated to a Bo
nanza scribe that on the Big Four
lease operated by Poak-Chapman-Steen
lease at the 200-foot level a
four-foot ledge of $70 ore is being
mined and at the present time 200
tons of the ore Is on the dump
ready for milling. The shaft
now down 300 feet, and from which
point a crosscut will be run to cut
this high value of ore on the 200-
foot level above. Mr. Harris' opin
ion of Manhattan on mining is val
ued by all mining investors, and
he says Manhattan, with new cap!
tal, will make good and i that the
Pine Tree camp, Inside of a year
will be producing over a million
dollars a year. Mr. Harris returns
to Manhattan tomorrow.
ESPEE ROAD
WILL ALLOW STOPS
IN NEVADA
SOUTHERN PACIFIC TO GRANT
five-Way stopovers to
homeseekers.
RENO, Nev., March 25. The an
nual migration of homeseekers to
the coast Is now under way and
Southern Pacific trains passing
through Reno are crowded by those
who heed Greeley's . advice. The
railroad company has made a help
tin- concession lor Nevada by per
mitting afive-day stopover to the
travelers at any point within th
state and many are taking advan
tage of It
JVM. Fulton, district freight and
passenger agent, is doing good work
for Nevada by distributing the
handsome booklets of the company
on irrigation and farming in the
west to passengers who go through
the state.
John A. Gill, traveling freight and
passenger agent, is also an apostle
to the homeseekers, giving glowing
descriptions of our resources.
This movement of thousands of
farmers from the wovked-out middle
west agricultural region will con
tinue until the middle of April.
Tickets one way will he sold until
April 10 in the east and there is a
movement on foot in this state to
make a bid for settlers.
From Reno a stopover traveler
might visit Mason valley, Carson
valley and Minden easily. From
Hazen he could take a trip through
Fallon and the Truckee-Carson dis
trict. If the cities could have a
little booklet of their own to nut
on the train a few stations ahead
or at Ogden the trainmen would
doubtless see they were distributed
In time.
Tonopah could well afford to get
busy along this line and make an
effort to bring to this section some
of the many homeseekers who are
now wending their way west. The
Reno stopover privilege wojild allow
of a visit to this section and there
is considerable land in the vicinity
of Millers that could be taken un
by homeseekers. Now is the time
for action and a booklet on the
order of those suggested above
would prove of great benefit to this
section.
CASINO TONIGHT.
Remember the Harem Skirt dance
tonight. Don't fail to see Agnes in
"The Gibson Girl" act or the pic
tures which will be shown every
hour.
Fresh
Market.
milk and cream at Palace
12-12-tf
The Daily
people.
Bonanza reaches the
SUPT.LOWE
RESIGNS AT
LIBERTY MINE
C.
R. OLSEN AI'POIXTF.D
CHARGE OF TONOPAn
LIBERTY. IN
Superintendent A. E. Lowe of the
Tonopah-Liberty mine of Liberty
has tendered his resignation, and
C. R. Olsen Is said to have been
appointed his successor. Just what
Mr. Lowe intends to do is not as
yet knowii. Rumor has it that he
will remain in this section and be
come animated with some other
mine. Mr. Lowe himself, however,
refuses to give out any of his
plans at the present time.
PR ES RYTKItlAX 1 1 U I SCI I.
Sunday services at the Presby
terian, church, St. Patrick street.
Rev. Herman L. Burnham, minister.
follows: Evening service at
7:45, subject: "Salvation the Onlv
Cure for Sin." This is the third
in the Sunday evening sermons for
Lent. Good singing by the con
gregation and special selections by
male quartet. Bible school at 9:45
a. m., W. L. Malone, superintend
ent. Morning oreachinc service at
11 a. m. Yourg People's meeting
at. 6:45 p. m. A cordial welcome
to all is extended to all the services
of the church. "Come with us and
we will do thee good."
GOOD BILL AT
THE BUTLER IS
THE PROMISE
VAUDEVILLE TEAM WILL MAKE
ENTIRE CHANGE FOR THE
SUNDAY SHOWS.
One of the best programs of the
senson will be shown at the But
ler this evening. "The Alvias" will
appear In their clever up-to-date
vaudeville sketch, having an entire
change for Sunday afternoon and
evening. "A Cowboy's' Devotion,"
"Carmensita the Faithful" and a
splendid Vitagraph drama, entitled
"The League of Mercy." Tomor
row's program is as follows: "Max
Has the Boxing Fever,"x (comedy) ;
"An Imitator of Blondin," (comedy),
"The Ransom of Red Chief," (In
dian story), and "The New Sten
ographer," (Vitagraph comedy.)
PERSONAL MENTION
L. R. Andrews is a guest at the
Mizpah.
O. U. Pryce of Goldfleld is a Miz
pah guest.
Harry Lelght of Kansas City Is a
Tonopah visitor.
Charles A. Smith of Liberty la
in Tonopah to spend Sunday. '
C. L. Milward of Rhyolite is, a
Tonopah visitor. He is stopp-lnK at.
the Mizpah.
A. E. Lowe is a Tonopah visitor
from v Liberty. He Is registered at
the Mizpah. -
H. L. Keely of New York, rep
resentative of the Mining and Engl
nerlng Journal, returned yesterday
from Liberty.
.
Judge Mark R. Averill left this
morning for Reno. He is billed to
return to Tonopah by April 3.
B. M. Bateman, formeny
em-
ployed at the West End mine.
has
returned from a , pleasure
through California.
trip
Judge J. S. Orr of Reno Will ar
rive in Tonopah in the morning and
will hear several cases duHng the
next few days.
Remember the Harem Skirt dance
tonight. Don't fall to see-Agnes in
"The Gibson Girl" act or the pic
tures which will be shown every
hour. r-
Did you try the merchants'
at the Frisco Cafe? 35c.
lunch
2-7-tt
b & O

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