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The Eureka sentinel. (Eureka, Nev.) 1902-current, January 18, 1902, Image 1

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THE EUEEKA SENTINEL.
ESTABLISHED 1870._EUREKA, NEVADA, SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 1902._PUBLISHED SATURDAYS;
<t£he ©urcha -Sentinel.
TERMS FOR WEEKLY SKYTINEL.
One copy, etis year.00
One copy, six month*... f
One copy, three months. 1 *■>
By Carrier, i»er month. 80
BlftTLINW CATTI.K IN OftMJON.
Tacoma, Waah., January 11.—The cat
tlemen of eastern Washington and Ore
gon find that even thousands more head
of cattle than they aupposed have been
rounded up and driven out of the country
by stock tustiers during the past bum
mer and Fall. For three months it lias
been known that cattle thievea were vig
orously at work, especially on the great
bunch grass ranges of eastern Oregon
south of Pendleton. The high prices for
beef anti the activity of buyers of strong,
sturdy horses for the British army have
given an impetus to the rustlers, and en
abled them to make tens of thousands of
dollars hv their wholesale thievery.
In making their final round-u|>s before
beginning Winter feeding the cattlemen
find that from 10 to 12 per cent of their
herds on an average have been stolen.
Until this time it was generally believed
that much larger |>ercentages than usual
of the herds had wandered into the foot
hills after better feed. Diligent search
•hows that such was not the case, and
that the missing cattle have simply been
ran out by rustlers. Their activity has
been greatest in the Bingham Springs
country, through the John Day district
tod in the bouthern Umatilla country.
Ctttlemen say their logses will aggregate
not less than $100,000.
TOMUPAH’M PHMr.Hr NITI'ATIOM.
A correspondent writing Irom Tonujiah,
Nevada, says: “Only eight short months
had passed since the first pick was stiuck
in the croppings that miners had passed
by for years, and yet the first New Year
was celebrated by 1,500 people, and they
represented the energy that in this short
time has taken over $5,000,000 from the
bowels of the earth. The leases having
expired on December 31, 1901, many
people are leaving the camp for the Win
ter. Things are quieting down and there
is much sickness in the district, ow ing to
poor sanitary conditions. It will prob
ably be some weeks before Tonopah will
he in smooth running order again. The
new company must fix its plans; the
mines are in a strange sha|ie. They have
been gutted and the work bo far done will
be of little use, save it be considered as
prospect work. However, things will
soon adjust themselves and work will be
gin at Tonopah more systematically. The
output will probably not be so large each
month, but the number of men employed
will continue to be larger and Tonopah
will be one of the largest towns in the
Blate of Nevada, if not the largest."
lew HI H»:*r, RKAI.I.Y NKRIiRR.
Sacramento P.ee: Congressman S. D.
Woods, of this district, lias introduced
in the National House a bill for the crea
tion of a department of Mines and Min
ing, with a Secretary of the same, who
shall be a member of the President’s
Cabinet.
The bill provides for the transfer of the
geological survey from the Department of
the Interior and for making the Director
of the Survey the Director of a Bureau
for the collection and dissemination of
practical and useful information concern
ing the mines, mineral resources, and
mining industries of the United States.
The mining industry is one of the most
important in the country and one of the
most profitable. Its importance seems
to be a good deal increased by the new
possessions. There has heen need for
such a department in the Executive
branch of the Federal Government for
some time, and the need will increase
rather than diminish.
Hrynu'a Coiiiiuourr.
Mr. Bryan's Commoner will not cease
publication, as has l>een reported, says a
Lincoln, Nebraska press dispatch. At
no time within the eleven months of its
existence has it been more prosperous
thf.ii now. The paid circulation is 10,
300, and as the paper has a good supply
of advertisements at big rates, it is not
wrong to say that Mr. Bryan will clean up
♦40,000 the first year. I-ocal publishers
say that his profits will not fall below
♦50,000. Mr. Bryan lias no printing out
fit, hut ttiirty persons are employed in
the business office to handle the incom
ing and departing mail.
I'nraun l.lbel Null.
Judge Mack has inaugurated a prose
cution (or*criminal libel against H. A.
I-emmon and H. C. I>unn, publishers of
the Carson News. The grounds of the
ra-e* »hm a i-titcment published in the
News relative to Judge Mack’s position
in the case of Peters vs. Jones, and was
to the effect that the Supreme Court had
declared Mack unqualified to sit in the
case, after the latter had refused to call
in another Judge.
1 wo Elko ladies have opened a private
sanitarium in that town.
STATE NEWS ITEMS.
Elko hit thirty-three students attend
ing the State University.
The Bonanza warns people to stay
away from Tonopah for the present.
The Republican State Central Com
mittee will meet at Carson on January 18.
The White Pine county tax rate for
1902 has been fixed at $3.65 on each $100
valuation.
Mrs. J. L. Butler distributed $1,000
among the needy people of Tonopah on
New Year’s day.
The tax levy of Ormsby county for this
year has been fixed at $3 on each $100
of assessed valuation.
The earnings of the Bullion and Ex
change bank at Carson the past fiscal
year returned 20 per cent to shareholders.
The Olympic group of mining claims
at Cherry Creek, White Pine county, has
been bonded to C. E. Hayden of Colorado
Springs for $20,000.
Work on the oil well at Elko has been
abondoned until Spring sets in. It is
said that the Hesperian company will
then resume sinking.
The licenses collected in Nye county,
Nevada, since the Tonopah boom began
are said to be more than the running ex
penses of the county.
Senator George Ernst of Elko has pur
chased the W. L. Pritchard ranch at Old
River, Churchill county, with the horses,
cattle, etc. for $12,000.
Kmmet Boyle, a Comstock raised boy
and a graduate of the School of Mines of
the State University, has been offered a
position at the famous Kio Tinto copper
mines in Spain.
The schools at Hawthorne have been
closed on account of the smallpox scare.
As yet there is only one case, a stranger
who came from Itandsburg, where there
were about thirty mild cases.
Three Concord coaches passed through
Wabuska last week, one sixteen passen
ger coach going to Sodaville and two
twelve passenger coaches to Candelaria,
to be used on the lines to Tonopah.
itepresentative Newlands has intro
duced a bill appropriating $70,000 for the
construction of a suitable building id
Iteno for use as a poetoffice and for gov
ernment offices. The building is to be
equipped with fireproof vaults, heating
and ventilating apparatus.
George H. Colson was shot and in
stantly killed at Winnemucca last week
by James A. Gale. Colson made im
proper proposals to the wife of Gale.
The coroner’s jury found that Gale was
justified in the killing and exonerated
him from all blame. Gale was given his
liberty.
T. L. Oddie, the treasurer of the old
Tonopah Mioing Company of Tonopah,
Nevada, has been elected manager of the
new Tonopah Mining Company, vice J.
H. Jenkins, resigned. F. Siebert, the
manager of the old Tonopah A Salt Lake
Company, has been appointed assistant
manager.
The Battle Mountain Central Nevadan
says that at Galena VV. Meagher struck
a good body of ore in his mine and is
averaging $10 per day. The gold prop
erties are also looking up as development
work is done on them and everything
looks very favorable towards Galena
again coming to the front as a great bull
ion producer.
stock Kxrhailct for Touopah.
News cornea from Tonopah district that
efforts are being made to organize a stock
exchange at Butler City, at which the
shares of mines in the camp can be
listed and dealt in, and the promotors
have sent to San Francisco for a copy of
the constitution, by-law s and rules of the
San Francisco Stock and Exchange
Board to aid them in forming the pro
posed institution.
Keno'a Pupnlaliou.
Journal: The census of the city and
immediate environment being made by
I). E. Morton is nearly completed. Mr.
Morton says that the population will
reach between 8,500 and 9,000. He ia
employed by Postmaster Krause and
Senator Flanigan. The purpose of the
census is to prove to Congress that Keno
needs a public building.
Rain and sweat *T«' \ \ \>
have do effect on fl/PITy I
harness treared M g I gf r II A
w.th Eureka Har- f VllMI/l
ness Oil. It re- .
do not break, j ' \ — V
EwTSK ; \y (JILw
and cut. I he
harnesa not
only keeps j
looking like I
new, t>ut
wears twice
as long by the
use of Eureka
Harnesa Oil.
Sold j
everywhere j
in cane— ll
alleiree. (I
Made by
Standard Oil
Company
TO TALK OR NOT TO TALK!
la Silence Golden nr la It Fooltak
and Unsocial?
Is the old figure of a “golden silence”
being washed away In the flood of
twentieth century volubility? And Is
it right that it should be so washed
away? We do not know the answers
to these questions. Perhaps you, gen
tle reader, know and will tell. We do
know that there is a good deal more
talk In the world than would have been
considered strictly necessary by our
forbears. If you don’t believe this, go
to the nearest library and ask to see
the bound volumes of The Congression
al Record. You might also take along
a certificate of sanity In case the libra
rian became alarmed at the request.
The old timers used to tell the youth
of the land to consider If what they
were about to say were not only "true
and tried,” but also “necessary.” The
idea held tar quite a time that it was
as reprehensible to waste words as to
dissipate wealth.
Our old friend Montaigne, however,
had a tender place In bis heart for the
talker. He declared, “The most nat
ural and fruitful exercise of the mind
is conversation, and I find the use of It
more sweet than any other action In
life.”
In some quarters members of the fem
inine sex are credited with an indorse
ment of Mr. Montaigne’s sentiment.
Is It wise to talk much? Or Is It fool
ish? Is silence golden? Or Is It unso
cial and therefore against civilization?
What do you think?—New York Tele
gram.
An EAbarruilac Query.
In a city where children above the
age of five years have to i>ay full fare
on the tramcars while those who are
younger go free the passengers In a
car saw one day a rather large boy,
looking seven years old at least, held In
his mother’s lap as though he were a
baby. The big child seemed restless
about something.
Presently he cried: ‘‘Mamma! Mam
ma!"
The mother, as If with a premonition
of something wrong, tried to hush him,
but he still kept saying: "Mamma!
Mamma!"
"Well, what Is it?” she asked at last.
"Mamma, when do I have to say I’m
only tive?”
Then the passengers—some of them—
laughed and the mother turned very
red.—London Answers.
Frond of tho Bor*
Doctor—’Pears to me laik de boy dun
got acute indegeshun.
Aunt Lucy (smiling through her tears)
—Dat’s It, doctah! Dat boy, sick er
well, dun eb’ryt’lng cute!—Judge.
LODCE DIRECTORY.
Df A MONO KKBEKAH LUUUIRo t
Meets seoond and fourth Monday
eveninga of each month at 7:30p g.
MRS CAROLINE LEWIS, N. O.
Mu. Lonu Zadow, Secretary.
Eureka Lodge No. 22. I. O. O. P.
Meets every Wednesday evening at
7:30 at F A A. M and I. O. O. F. Hall.
All sojourning brothers are cordially Invited
to visit JOHN BOTTINI, N. G.
John Gutoovica, Secretary.
II BIRA LtlBflE NO. 1«, P. A A. M.
THE stated OOMMUNIOATIONS OF Eu
reka Lodge No. 16, F. A A. M„ will bo
bald at Muonic HaU on tba Saturday c.' or be
fora tha full of tha moon In aacli month.
A. HINTZE. W. M.
R. McCnAki.Es. Secretary.
BKAT1FIC LOD8B NO. 7. K. OP F.
Meets every Tuesday evening at
its Castle Hall In tha Smith A Biokard
building, at 7 o'clock, from October 1st to
March 31st. and at 7:S0 o'clock from April 1st
to Beptembar 30th.
All Brother Knights in good standing are
fraternally Invited to attend.
F IM OBEB8TEO, C. 0.
Attest: M. B. Babtlett, K. R. AS.
NT. JOHN’S CHAPTER, NO. 8.
The stated convocations or st.
John’s Chapter, Ho. 6, R. A. M., will ba
held at Meaonlo Hall on the Saturday next
aoooeedlng tba pale of tbo moon In eaoh
month. G. R. MULLINS. H. P.
J. H. Jrbt, Secretary.
ALPHA LOME NO. 1, A. O. (J. W.
Meets second and fourth fri
day evening In each month la Pythian
Hall. A. HINTZE, M. W.
I. 0. C. Wxinotl, Recorder.
L. A. HARCOURT,
Physician and Surgeon

GRADUATE OF THE MEDICAL
Department of Buffalo University, Mem
ber of the Chicago Medical Society, Hon
orary Member of the Sacramento Society
for Medical Improvement.
Special attention given to Surgery and
Gynecology.
Office and residence—Brown Hotel, Eu
reka, Nevada.
Office Hours—2 to 4 p. M.
DR. H. HAGAR,
Physician and Surgeon.
EUREKA, NEVADA.
Offioe in the Masonic and Odd Fellows
uilding, Clark street.
C- HAMILTON
DENTIST.
OFFICE AT THE W. E. GRIFFIN
HOUSE ON SPRING STREET.
EUREKA, . . . NEVADA
A TIRED MUSICIAN.
Row ItnwM On re SnabbeS * Ru
■lu Conrt DlKoltorr.
When Johann 8trauss took hts or*
chostra to Russia, he had Rome unusu
al experiences not generally vouchsaf
ed to those who live outside an auto
cratic government.
One day he received the czarina's
commands to play before her at her
summer resort and was told, on arriv
ing there, that he would have to re
hearse his programme three times be
fore the performance. He begged to
know the reason for that, but no ex
planation was given him. These were
her majesty’s orders, and be could only
comply. Still, his astonishment grew
when he saw during the, three rehear
sals an empty court carriage drawn by
a pair of horses slowly going back and
forth In front of his orchestra.
Throughout the dual performance
the mysterious act was explained. Tha
empress, having a sharp attack of gout,
was obliged to recline In the carriage,
her foot on a cushion, while the con
cert took place, and the object of re
hearsal had been to accustom the
horses to a full string band lest they
should take fright and bolt with her.
At the end of the performance an ex
alted dignitary of the court bade
Strauss follow him to a splendid grand
piano, saying:
“Now be good enough to play me all
the newest Vienna music.”
Although be was pretty fatigued by
his three rehearsals and state perform
ance, StrauBS thought It expedient to
comply, but after he had played con
tinuously for over an hour he stopped,
saying, "I presume that will be suffi
cient?”
“I am not at all tired,” coolly rejoin
ed his excellency.
"But I am!” said Strauss and rose
from the Instrument — Youth’s Com
RAILROAD.
On and After Hot, 1,1901,
TRAINS
For Passengers, Malle, Ex
press and Freight,
WILL RUN DAILY EXCEPT SUNDAY,
(Pacific Standard Time),
as rouovs :
Leave Eureka at.1:00 P. M.
Arrive at Palisade at.600 p. M.
Connecting with West-bound train on Cen
tral Pacific at 8:35 p. m., arriving San Fran
cisco 425 P. M. following day. Also con
nects with East-bound train at 6:20 P. M.,
arriving at Ogden 5:45 a. m. and Salt Lake
City 8:20 a. m. following morning.
RETURNING
A3 FOLLOWS :
Lmv« Palisade at.7:00 a. m.
Arrive at Eureka at.12:01 F. M.
Stage for Ely leaves Eureka 1:30 F. M.,
arriving at Ely 8 a. m. following day.
To make olose connection passengers for
Eureka and Ely from the West should take
train leaving San Francisco at 8 a. x., and
from the East should take train leaving
Ogden at 10:15 A. x. any day, except Sat
urday.
THE COMPANY WILL
FORWARD ► FREIGHT
.TO.
Hamilton,
Tybo, Ely,
Belmont,
Reveille,
And all points South, by teams, with care
and dispatch, and at lowest rates. Cor
respondence solicited.
The Company has recently
built stock corrals at Diamond
(12 miles from Eureka), Alpha,
Hay Ranch and Palisade, and
is now prepared to handle
horses, cattle and sheep to and
from all points reached by rail
road in the country. Instead
of driving it will pay stockmen
to transport by rail. Water at
all points. Track scales now
being put in at Palisade for the
weighing of cattle. Rates most
reasonable and quoted upon
application.
G. D. ABBOTT, Sipt.
Palisade, Nevada,
BANK OF NEVADA.
-/ Virginia Street, Reno, Nevada.
DIRECTORS:—Daniel Meyer of San FrancistJb; Henry
Anderson, A. G. Fletcher, J. N. Evans, G. F. Turrittin,
Moritz Scheeline and P. L. Flannigan of Reno.
Subscribed Capital - - - $300,000.
Paid Up Capital, - - - - $150,000.
Undivided Profits - - - $120,000.
A econo t, of Bulk,, Corporation, and Individual, received on favorable tarn,
Interest Paid on Time Deposits.
Buy end Mil exchange on all the principal cut;* of th* United State*, Canada, Snrnp*
Aala and Africa.
Mmrc. Scheeline and Oabnrn are Beeidant Agent* for twenty-eight Fire Inanranee Companies
the total aaeet, of which are (ai7.MO.C81.
Safe Deposit Boxes for rent, prioee according to lixe, varying from (3 to (11 per »»——
OBO. r. TUBBimif. Preeldent
MORITZ SOHIKUNB ........I.!.Vice PreeMent
A. 0. RAY0RAFT.....„............. ...Caahlcr
IS Your Property Insured?
If not, Do You Think You Can Afford
to Carry the Risk Yourself?
I O. O. WHITMORE
Represents in Eureka Eleven of the
Largest, Oldest, and Soundest Fire
Insurance Companies Doing Business
in the United Statest as follows:
Commercial Union, of England,
Fireman’s Fund, of California,
Hartford, of Connecticut,
Hamburg-Bremen, of Germany,
London & Lancashire, of England,
Norwich Union, of England,
Palatine, of England,
Queen, of England,
Scottish Union & National, of Eng.
Western Assurance Co., of Canada,
Liverpool, London & Globe, of England.
Better Come in and See What a Policy Will Cost for
a Year or Longer,
Don’t Wait Until a Fire 8weeps Your Property Away.
Then It Will Be Bverlastingly Too Late.
I. c. C, WHITMORE.
— -
BROWN HOUSE
(FORMERLY THE JACKSON HOTEL.)
A modern hostlery with a
complete and efficient service
in every department. Table
constantly supplied with the
best the market affords.
Only Fire-Proof Hotel in Eastern Nevada. A First
Glass Bar in Connection. Booms
Single or En Suite.
MRS. JULIA BROWN
Main Street, - - Eureka Nevada
IP. ~ HICrTTXj,
Court Borne Block, Eureka.
.... DIALEB IN ....
FURNITURE,
Oils, Paints, Varnishes, Window
Glass and Wall Papers.
Full and Complete Fancy and Gilt Dinner and Tea Seta, contain
ing from 56 to 134 pieces, at from $8 to $25.
CF*AGENT FOB DOMESTIC SEWING MACHINES.
Carpets, Mnttlnjf, Crockery,Glassware&, Lamps
Full line of Tin and Granite Kitchen Ware.
Orders from the country promptly attended to.
Undertaking in All Its Branches*
SAN FRANCISCO BREWERY SALOON
PIONEER BOTTLINC WORKS,
EUREKA, NEVADA.
Always on Hand^^^^
Lemon and Cream Sodas,
Sarsaparilla, Champagne Cider,
I Birch Beer, Klondike Fizz,
Orange Cider, Ginger Ale,
Sarsaparilla and Iron,
Loganberry Soda, Etc.
-ALSO
Fine Wines, Liquors and Cigars.
Connected with the Saloon is a reading ltoom, where the latest daily and weekly
newspapers,'magazines and other periodicals can always be
found. A liberal share of patronage is respectfully solicited.
or Orders filled the same day as received.
F. J. BROSSEMER, : Proprietor

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