OCR Interpretation


The Eureka sentinel. [volume] (Eureka, Nev.) 1902-current, June 03, 1922, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of Nevada Las Vegas University Libraries

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86076201/1922-06-03/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

THE EUREKA SENTINEL
rusu»HSi> nm itmoiT ir
B. Jk.. SKILLUAN
FIFTY-FIRST YEAR
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
i >tie copy, one year..I*.00
jae copy. aU months.. 1.00
Single copies ten cents
Katered st the Poet Office at Eureka
as Second Class matter
II ■■■ ■ I— ■ I , _ ■' J'Jg l —
SATURDAY. JUNE S. 1922
CURRENT COMMENT
By Arthur Brisbane
Decoration Day has gone. The
number of graves is greater; the
story about the same. Some went
motoring; others fishing; or golfing;
some stayed at home; 10 per cent
played, the others worked or dec
orated graves. How dead they are,
they are gone, escegf In the hearts
of a few that remember; how decay
ful and completely dead. They might
as well have died 1,000 years ago.
No lesson is learned. More wars are
hatching, the preparation that pre
vents war is Ignored. We drift along,
und celebrate the decorating of
graves with a holiday.
"Henry Ford for President" clubs
are to start In every Congressional
district and arrangements made for
signatures enough to put Ford’s
name on the Presidential ballot ev
erywhere.
Mr. Ford would make an Interest
ing run and cause agitation. His
product is known to everybody. He
pays the highest wages, charges the
lowest price and succeeds, which is
most Important.
But there are "huts." He employs
no union men. He has virulently,
unjustly and Ignorantly attacked the
Jews, a most useful part of the citi
zenship, and efficient when it comes
to politics, or anything else. He has
suggested substitutes to be used as
money, in place of "gold, gold, yellow
and cold." Imagine how that would
worry the bankers, they have some
thing to say about elections. Imag
ine a Presidential order: "Throw
out all tv- ij"ld in the treasurv. we 1
don't need It."
Fesd^ c.i..iidacy is not f*"rmbai»le,
ard let no mac i*ug« •<. ii. iou
might see bankers, union labor and
various other things, including the
Domix-railc end K'.yubltcau ptu.. *
uniting OP * T->dl<lnte to beat him,
as Democrats ab- .U.»> ublicans united
— unsuccessfully—to beat "Golden
Rule” Jones of <r"tedc, or Berger oi
Milwaukee.
We ore to see strange things in
this country, and one may see the
two old parties hunting for a man
strong enough to beat Ford.
Gifford Plnchot reports that be
spent $93,6(2.14 on bis victorious
primary campaign for Governor of
Pennsylvania. His virtuous, van
quished opponent, Mr. Alter, with
bosses s, administration, high fi
nance and the old Pennsylvania ma
chine back of him, spent only 81.*
131.80. He says so himself. Per
haps he and his backers thought they
had it all arranged, and did not need
to spend money—perhaps he did not
know what his friends really spent
for him. In any case, it shows that
laws forbidding legitimate use of
money in campaigns might help the
machine and hurt the people.
Plnchot spent his own money, for
the chance to serve the people honest
ly and had he not spent it he could
not have won the nomination.
SEALS SELL KAMM TO
CHICAGO AMERICANS
New York, May 29.—The sum of
$100,000, together with two players
valued at $26,000, reported as the
price the Chicago American League
club has agreed to pay the San Fran
cisco club in the Pacific Coast Lea
gue for Inflelder Willie Kamm,equals
the high record established last De
cember by John J. McGraw, mana
ger of the New York Nationals.
It Is the common understanding
the McGraw paid $100,000 and two
players, whose value may or may not
have been $25,000 to the Cincinnati
club of the National League tor
Helnle Groh, who plays third base,
the same position as Kamm. Mc
Graw, about the same time, paid
$76,000 to the San Francisco club
for Jimmy O'Connell, who will not
come to the Giants until next year.
Baseball men are under the Impres
sion that the New York American
League management paid between
$76,000 and $100,000 to the Boston
Rad Sox owners for “Babe” Ruth,
the greatest drawing card in the his
tory of sport, but that was before he
demonstrated his exceptional proweee
as a home run hitter.
SOUTHERN PACIFIC LOSES
ANTI-TRUST FEDERAL SUIT
Washington, Hay 29.—The Su
preme Court has decided In favor of
the Federal government in the anti
trust suit against the Southern Pa
cific associated interests. The court
held that the acquisition, ovnershlp
and control of the Central Pacific,
from Odgen to San Francisco, re
strains competition, thereby violating
the Sherman lav.
The decision that the Southern Pa
cific must 4}vorce Itself from the Cen
tral Pacific line was the decision of
six to one.. McKenna dissented vig
orously.
8. P. OFFICIALS SILENT
San Francisco. May 29.—The Su
preme Court decision is believed to
be the menus of bringing the Central
Pacific linos under control of the
Union Pacific, taking from the South.
I urn Pacific Important tranacontinent
i al traffic Unas. Southern Pacific of
1 flcials have made no comment on the
'
DOTED DESCRIBES
WORD IT SUM
In addition to keeping agricultur
ists in all parts of the country in
formed on a variety of matters from
trading black angora goats for pigs
to recommending good attorneys for
prospective candidates for divorce
who found life on tha farm with their
present wives Irksome, the Agricul
tural Experiment Station at the Uni
versity has conducted and is conduct
ing some very important experiments
on poisonous plants, animal diseases
and the feeding of live stock, S. B.
Doten, director of the station told
the members ,of the Rotary club at a
recent luncheon.
Mr. Doten read a letter from a
farmer in Iowa who said he was hav
ing trouble with his wife and wished
to spend a few months in Reno and
as the Agricultural Experiment Sta
tion was a bureau of general infor
mation he wanted the name of an at
torney and also wanted to know what
a divorce would cost and other neces
sary Information.
Writing from Paradise Valley an
other correspondent declared he had
the only black angora goat in cap
tivity— a boy goat—and wanted to
trade it to Mr. Doten for a flock of
pigs.
Mr. Doten told of the progress
made since 1891 in the study of poi
sonous plants, the study of range con
ditions and the study of animal dis
eases. The work of the experiment
station was started by Prof. N. E.
Wilson, he said, and has continued
for 31 years with good results. Bul
letins from the Nevada station on
various subjects have been copied all
over the world and have become
standard, especially those on Irriga
tion, animal disease and poisonous
plants.
VIOLATORS OF AUTO
LAW BEING SOUGHT
Motorists who have tailed to com
ply with the State motor vehicle law
requirements are now the subjects ot
a State-wide roundup being conduct
ed by Inspector of the State Police
Dan Renear.
After a tour of the Carson Valley
and vicinity, Inspector Renear re
ports that violators of the motor ve
hicle law are becoming fewer and
fewer daily, although many offenders
were arrested In the locality just vis
ited.
Absence of 1922 licenses and cars
with only one license plate constitute
most ot the offenses to date.
Inspector Renear also is checking
up on automobile owners who have
taken licenses for small cars and are
using them on trucks and machines
whose size requires a much greater
license fee than that paid.
#
CALIFORNIA DRIVER WINS
INDIANAPOLIS AUTO RACE
Speedway, Indianapolis, Indiana.—
May 30.—Jimmy Murphy of Los
Angeles, winner of the French Grand
Prix of 1921, won the 500-mlle auto
mobile race at the Indianapolis speed
way to-day before a record-breaking
crowd of 135,000. Murphy won $28,
000 in cash prizes.
The time was 5:17:30:78, an aver
age of 94.48 miles per hour, a world’s
record tor the distance.
Harry Hartz, also of Los Angeles,
finished second, four laps behind Mur
phy. Hartz won $10,000. Eddie
Hearne was third.
STATE HIGHWAYS TO
ELIMINATE CROSSINGS
Grade crossings must go, so far as
Nevada Is concerned, says a Carson
dispatch.
The Public Service Commission will
soon Issue an order forbidding them
in highway construction. New cross
ings must be either over-head or un
der-pass. Their cost will be borne
one-third by the railroads, one
twelfth by the State and seven
twelfths by the Federal government.
The order la based on a recent
hearing.
MANHATTAN ALMOST
DESTROYED BY FIRE
A fire that originated in the Kettle
hat building In the old central Nye
County mining camp of Manhattan
early Friday morning, almost de
stroyed the business and much of the
residence portion of the town before
being brought under control by dyna
miting. The loss Is estimated at
1125,000. Water was scarce and It
was necessary to resort to the use of
explosives to stop the progress of the
flames.
SMALL CATERPILLARS ARE
ON THE WAY TO NEVADA
George W. Borden, chief of the Ne
vada Highway Department, states
that he has been advised of the ship
ment of two flve-ton caterpillar trac
tors In surplus war equipment allot
ted to Nevada. All ten-ton caterpil
lars wanted by the Nevada depart
ment have been forthcoming, but the
smaller else machines have been hard
to get, the shipment on the way being
the first sent to this State.
SIMON MILL TREATS
210 TONS OF ORE DAILY
The new mill of the Simon Silver
Lead Mines Company, at Simon, la
treating on an average of 210 tone of
ore daily. Superintendent Hillard
expects to greatly Increase this ton
nage soon. Hillard says the mill is
making a Sne extraction of lead and
sine. Twelve men are employed in
the mill, which is running three
shifts. The company has Just started
work on the new three compartment
shaft.
BRIEF MENTION
The wlthdrawl of a single steel
rivet from an ocean steamship with a
displacement of 28.000 tons can be
detected by a new method perfected
by the Bureau of Standards.
A horse, 81 years old. Is living at
Catawissa. Pennsylvania. He is the
property of a minister who has owned
him for 35 years. The horse is be- ■
lieved to be the oldest In existence.
Eight thousand boys and girls In
all New York City’s high schools have
enrolled as block captains In the
Spring and Summer drive to keep the
streets and vacant lots free from re
fuse.
Chicago Is planning to establish a
night marriage license bureau. Many
persons actually cannot spare the
time to obtain a license during the
working hours and hesitate about
taking associates Into their confi
dence when asking for the time off.
While millions are starving along
the Volga River In Russia. Inhabi
tants of great areas of that country
not remote from the Volga are malt- I
Ing and distilling their surplus grain
and Indulging in drunkenness after a
long period of abstinence, according
to the Moscow Investlya.
In the town of Marhorat, Germany,
two large steel shell cases have been
hung in the steeple of the church and
a clapper suspended between them.
When the clapper Is shaken by means
of ropes the shell cases respond, giv
ing a clear, resonant tone of great
carrying power. During the war the '
bells of many churches In Germany
were melted. . |
Soldiering is an expiring profession !
in Germany. Many former army of-:
fleers are doing menial work. Drosh- j
kies, taxis and other horse-drawn ve- 1
hides in German cities are being
driven by former commissioned offi
cers. Common Boldiers in the ranks.
are faring better than their officers.:
Thousands of soldiers turned to agrl-i
culture and trades tor a living, but |
the officers, who had made a career
of the army, had no other training to
make a livelihood.
Guarded by two United States Gov- ,
ernment cutters, the Pacific seal herd
la moving from the south Pacific to ,
the Summer rendezvous on the Prlb-1
ilof Islands In the middle of the Ber
lng Sea. This is the only herd known
to be In existence with the exception
of a small colony that Summers on
the Commander Islands, off the coast
of Kamchatka, Siberia. After June
15 the herd will have passed Into
Bering Sea and three other coast
guard vessels will then maintain a
rigid guard there.
Efforts are being made during the
coming Summer to retrieve some of
the $15,000,000 worth of speciewhich
sank in the Bea when the Laurentic
was torpedoed during the war by a
German submarine near Lough Swll
ly, Donegal. Previous salvage op
eratlons saved approximately two
thirds of the treasure and specially
trained divers from the British navy
are expected to recover the rest. The
vessel lies In about 20 fathoms of
water and the huge boilers rolling
about make operations hazardous.
Alexandre Dumas, Toussaint
L’Ouverture, Rene Maran, and many
other writers and scholars of France
are of Negro descent.
POLITICAL ANNOUNCEMENTS
CLARENCE JOHNSON
Republican Candidate For
COUNTY COMMISSIONER
First Commissioner District
Subject to the decision of the
Republican Primary
DR. MABEL K. YOUNG
Independent Candidate for
CLERK AND TREASURER
Of Eureka County
—NOTICE TO—
TAXPAYERS
The second installment of
Taxes for the year 1921 are due
and payable at the office of the
County Treasurer at the Court
house in Eureka, Nevada, on
Monday, May 1, 1922, and un
less paid on or before Monday,
June S, 1922, cost of delin
quency will be added.
No notice will be mailed to
taxpayers for the Second In
stallment of Taxes.
R. McCHARLEft,
County Treasurer.
Eureka, Nevada, May 1, 1922.
THE J&L CAFE
-AND
ICE CREAM PARLORS
Home Cooking — Regular
Meals 50 cents; Special
Sunday dinners 75
Cents
Rates to steady boarders and
lodgers. Travelers ac
commodated
MAIN an., EUREKA. NEVADA
—... ■■ i 11
! NEVADA STATE NEWS
FTed Bender, engineer of the Mu
tant Mien Company, who haa visited
a deposit in the Ruby mountains of
Elko County, Is quoted as saying the
mine is In commercial mica.
Thomas J. Walsh, son of Mrs. J. K.
Walsh, of McGill and Miss Claire
Anderson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs
M. Anderson, of Spring Valley. White
Pine County, were awarded scholar
ships in the State University estab
lished by the Scottish Rite.
The search for E. S. Bates, black
smith, and his son, A, R. Bates, who
escaped from the custody of prohi
bition agents Wednesday after shoot
ing Officer Perdval Nash came to an
tmd Saturday morning when the fu
gitives, accompanied by Attorney M.
B. Moore, walked into the county
jail and surrendered.
It is said the game of golf was In
vented by Scotch shepherds, who,
having nothing else to do, amused
themselves by knocking stones about
with their crooks. They measured
off their holes in circles, because In
that way they coud keep watch over
their herds. The holeB were marked
by a tag of wool attached to a stake.
Legal blanks for sale at the Sen
tinel nttteft
ICE FOB SALE
Clear, mountain water ice
will be delivered in large or
small quantities to patrons
in Eureka twice each week
from now on and during the
coming Summer months—
One cent a pound delivered
in small quantities —100
pound lots 75 cents. See M.
M. Fletcher for deliveries.
Elko Paint Shop
Company
Auto Painting and Signs, Paper
ing, Painting, Paints, Paper
and Varnishes for sale—
Get our quotations.
Our Motto: “Quality and Service"
Write to me, I go anywhere
J. D. LEWIS, Proprietor,
Store 524 Commercial Street—
Phone 1951—P. O. Box 465
ELKO, NEVADA
Ranch
For
Sale
/
At Twin Springs, 60 miles
east of Tonopah and 80 miles
south of Euryeka, consisting of
640 acres of good land, with
120 acres under wire fence;
three room bouse; water for ir
rigation purposes, consisting of
springs, right on the land; good
range for cattle or sheep out
side; would make a good Home
Ranch for cattle or sheep out
fit. Title perfect—U. S. Patent.
If interested.write to or see
H. REISCHKE,
Box 890, Tonopah, Nevada
NOTICE
Notice la hereby given that the re
ward offered under date of April 21,
1919, for information leading to the
conviction and imprisonment of any
one stealing cattle, horses or hogs,
has been withdrawn, effective June 1,
1922.
STATE BOARD OF STOCK COM
MISSIONERS.
H. F. DANGBERO. President.
EDWARD RECORDS, Secretary.
According to a German official
document published recently, the
number of submarinee lost by that
government during the war was 19#. |
Including boats sunk, Interned and j
captured.
NEW TO-DAY
NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S
SALE OF REAL AND
PERSONAL PROPERTY
In the Third Judicial District Court
of the State of Nevada In and
for the County of Eureka
A. A. Wait, Plaintiff, vb. Eureka-Ne
vada Mining Company, a Corpora
tion, Defendant.
Under and by virtue of an execu
tion Issued out of the above-entitled
Court In an action wherein A. A.
Wait is plaintiff, and Eureka Ne
vada Mining Company, a corporation.
Is defendant, upon a judgment ren
dered on the 2nd day of February.
1922, in favor of the said plaintiff
and against the said defendant, for
the principal sum of $1,938.14, to
gether with costs in the sum of $458.
70, also an attorney’s fee of $25.00.
lawful money of the United States of
America, together with Interest at
the rate of 7% per annum from the
date hereof until paid, and accruing
costs In the sum of $-, I have
this day levied upon all of the right,
title, claim and Interest of the Bald
defendant in and to the following de
scribed real and personal property,
to-wlt:
Those certain lode mining claims
situate In Eureka Mining District, i
County of Eureka, State of Nevada,
known as and called: LUCID TUF
FA, LUCID TUFFA EXTENSION,
MAGDALENA, PACK SADDLE, and
PACK SADDLE FRACTION NO. 1,
the above being unpatented lode min
ing claims, together with all the ap
purtenances thereunto belonging, and
with all the Improvements thereon.
Also the following described per
sonal property: One iron car; 27
drums of fuel oil of approximately
100 gallons per drum; 11 empty fuel
oil drums; 6 pieces of halt-inch Iron,
16 feet long; 1 half-drum lubricating
oil; 2 ore cars;- 400 feet of fuse; 1
windlass bucket; 100 pounds of hand
steel; one drill auger; 8 picks; 5
shovels; 1 double hand hammer; 5
single hand hammers; 2 monkey
wrenches; 1 roll of six foot packing;
j 2 Iron bedsteads; 2 bed springs; 2
mattresses; 1 No. 8 cook stove, and 1
gasoline lamp.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
I will, on Monday, February 27th,
1922, at the hour of one o’clock of
said day, at the front door of the
Court House of the said District
Court, in Eureka, County of Eureka,
State of Nevada, sell at public auction
for current lawful money of the Unit
ed States of America, all of the right,
title, claim and Interest of the Bald
defendant in and to the above de
scribed property, or so much thereof
as may be necessary to satisfy said
judgment, with Interest and costs and
accruing costs, to the highest bidder
for cash.
Dated this 2nd day of February,
1922.
MARTIN MAHONEY.
Sheriff of Eureka County, Nevada.
First publication February 4, 1922.
Last publication February 25, 1922.
SALE POSTPONED
The above sale Is hereby postponed
to Thursday, June 1, 1922, at the
hour of 1 p. m.
M. MAHONEY,
Sheriff of Eureka County, Nevada.
By E. S. Cobb, Deputy.
I -
SALE POSTPONED
The above sale is hereby postponed
to Monday, July 3, 1922, at the hour
of 1 o’clock p. m.
M. MAHONEY,
) SherllT of Eureka County Nevada.
By E. S. Cobb, Deputy.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
In the District Court of the Third
Judicial District of the State of
Nevada, in and for the Coun
ty of Eureka
In the matter of the Estate of Mada
ltne Fraser, deceased.
Notice is hereby given that Alex
ander Fraser was by an order of the
District Court of the Third Judicial
District of the State of Nevada, in
and for the County of Eureka, duly
made and entered on the 29th day of
May, A. D., 1922, appointed executor
of the estate of Madeline Fraser, de
ceased, and that he has qualified as
such executor.
Notice is hereby further given that
all persons having claims against the
said estate will file them with the
proper vouchers attached with the
Clerk of the above entitled Court
within three (3) months of the first
publication of this notice, or they will
be forever barred.
Dated at Eureka. Nevada, this 29th
day of May, A. D., 1922.
(Signed) ALEXANDER FRASER,
Executor of said Estate.
E. P, Carvllle. Elko, Nevada, At
torney for said Executor.
First publication June 3, 1922.
Last publication July 1, 1922.
— ■ ■ _
REDUCED RATES
SUMMER
VACATION
TRIPS
The SOUTHERN PACIFIC now
has on sale reduced round-trip
fares to points located onthelakes.
beaches or in the mountains:
LAKE TAHOE
PACIFIC GROVE
HAN FRANCISCO
SANTA CRUZ
YOSKMITE
LOS ANGELES
sad Various Other Points
Tickets will be on sale at all
stations until September 30th.
fl LOW FARES
TO THE EAST
There will be on sale effective
May 25th to August 31st, final re
turn limit October 31st, reduced
round-trip fares:
Pares from PALISADE To
New York .*142.40
Boston .„ 158.82
Philadelphia . 189.02
Baltimore . 186.56
Washington . 186816
Chicago . 81.00
St. Louis . 76.50
New Orleans . 80.15
°™»ha .. 87.00
Kansas City . 67.00
p*«l . 82810
Minneapolis . 82810
mere wui also be on sale to -"“v”**” . oa.o«
these resorts on Friday* and Satur- Liberal stop-over privileges
»*Ck**m Mml,t*d _Oftvem Above fares apply via Odgen
days, at a still greater reduced rate. Going and Returning
For connections, train service and fares via other attractive and
Interesting routes apply to nearest Southern Pacific Agent or write:
Reno, Nevada, I. M. FULTON, Asst. Gen'l F. A P. A.
The First National Bank
WINNEMUCCA, NEVADA
Capital and Surplus, $300,000.00
Resources, $3,500,000.00
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS
GEO. WINGFIELD, President
J. SHEEHAN. Vice-President
W. H. DOYLE, Vice-President
C. L. TOBIN, Cashier
A. D. DEEN, Asst. Cashier
J. G. MOORE, Asst. Cashier
J. SHEEHAN
W. H. DOYLE
W. H. MOFFAT
WILLIAM STOCK
J. O. TAYLOR
O. E. STALL
The resources of the Federal Reserve Banking System at this time
exceed the aggregate resources of the National Banks of Issue of Eng
land. the Dominion of Canada. France, Italy, the Netherlands, Nor
way and Sweden, Denmark, Japan and Germany.
This bank Is a member of the Federal Reserve System ana operates
under the supervision of the United States Government, which as
sures safety and the conservative handling of business transactions.
We pay four per cent on all time deposits and Interest will be com
pounded semi-annually In our Savings Department, recently estab
lished.
We draw drafts on all principal cities of the world and are agents for
most of the reliable Fire Insurance Companies.
The Oldest National Bank in Nevada
THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK
ZE31ULO. Nevada
Capital and Surplus S200.000.
Member of a United States Federal Reserve Bank and under Gov
ernment Inspection, which to-day means a Strong and Safe Bank
We solicit your banking business
J. A. Sewell, President A. E. Kimball, Vice-President
E. E. Ennor, Vice-Pres. and Cashier W. L. Merithew, Asst. Cashier
THE EUREKA GASH STORE
CHOICE GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS
HARDWARE AND AMMUNITION
Vegetables and Fruit Received Every Week by Express
COMPIJSTE LINE OK TINWARE, AGATEWARE
GRANITEWARE AND COOKING UTENSILS
J. B. BIALE, Manager
Sole agent in Eureka tor the Giant Powder Co. Consolidated
ALL GOODS DELIVERED PROMPTLY
THE EUREKA HOTEL
la now the leading hotel in Eureka. It is a brick and stone
building with hot and cold water throughout, elec
trically lighted, and has an up-to-date bath room.
A first class Cafe is also run in connection.
EDWARD HERRERA, Proprietor
Corner Main and Clark Street* Eureka, Nevada
W. H. RUSSELL, Proprietor
Eureka Garage & Supply Co
PUBLIC GARAGE AND REPAIR SHOP
Agent for Dodge Cars and Trucks—Handle Goodyear
Tires, Tubes and other Rubber Goods—We carry
Gasoline, Oils, Greases and a full line of
Auto Accessories and Supplies
MAIN STREET EUREKA, NEVADA
Farmers an dIMeroIiants
^rational Bank.
EUREKA, NEVADA
Under Direct Supervision of the United States Government
Member of Federal Reserve Bank District No. 12
R. C. Kelley J. B. Rebaleati
KELLEY & REBALEATI
GARAGE AND REPAIR SHOP
Wholesalers and Retail Dealers in Gasoline, Kerosene, I
Distillate and Oils—Auto and Wagon Work—Horse- I
shoeing and Blacksmithing — Oxy - Actylene
Welding, Brazing and Tinsmithing
We carry United States, Goodyear and Michelin Tfce*l
SOUTH MAIN STREET, EUREKA, NEVADA A

xml | txt