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Carson City daily appeal. [volume] (Carson City, Nev.) 1907-1930, May 23, 1921, Image 2

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CARSON CITY DAILY APPEAL, MONDAY, MAY 23, 1921
The Carson City Daily Afrfreal
PUBLISHED EVERY EVENING. EXCEPT SUNDAY, BY THE NEVADA
PRINTING COMPANY
T. D. VAN DEVORT
Editor and Manager
Entered as Matter of the Second Class at the Postoffice at Carson City, Nevada,
tinder Act of Congress of March 3, 1879
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION
- 112.00
- - - - - - - - 9.00
xson City Daily Appeal is the real live advertising medium of this section
cviuciitcu ujr 119 carrying a larger amount oi advertising man any paper il
the city.
One year by Carrier
Une year by Mail
Ca
Trnnr it nn on o n n inn
TAKING LUMPS OF WEATHER
Have a lump of sugar in your coffee or your tea
Take a lump of weather as you go along with me.
Just the way you'll have it,
Zephyr light or tempest strong
But always somewhere something
Like the sweetness of a song.
Taking lumps of weather as it changes day by day
Is learning to be seasoned for the spirit of the fray.
Not for us the choosing,
But for us to say and sing
If it's winter, then it's winter ;
If it's spring, hooray for spring!
The savor's in the substance of our feeling for the life,
Contented with its beauty and resigned to meet its strife
Have a lump of weather,
In your heart and trudge along . .
Just so, in balm or blizzard,
You've the sweetness of the song!
B. B., in Baltimore Sun.
Carson City, Nevada
The outcome of hard work, of honesty, of thrift, of eommon'yttt tftl'l
t i r ia. i e !t am
decency may oe allowed to iase care oj. useii. . ,
It is not so important to be spectacular or brilliant. Very otten
the spectacular passes like a comet's tail, the brilliancy dies out likelT
a fire in straw, ana tne slow, saie piouamg, mat tnrougn tnicK ana)
thin lias somehow kept on going, tells at last. I
People tell us that civilization is headed for the rocks that
we're going back to the dark ages of barbarism.
That Avail of pessimism is as old as the hills.
The men who are doing the Work have not time for it. Tell it to
the park benches, the idlers at the curbstones and the erap-shooters
in the back alleys, but do not try to impose on the workers with that
iioary lie.
Inch by inch, day by day, the world goes forward and the world
grows better by the combined push and pull of all creation travailing
and toiling together; and you and 1, just where we are, either help
or hinder.
TOPICS IN BRIEF
"We hope the Irish won't knock Derby into a cocked hat.
Chicago Journal of Commerce.
Russian "Red" is shading into a fawn rather than a dove color.
Norfolk Virginian-Pilot.
"
When Germany throws a bouquet, look wit for a string attached.
Boston Shoe and Leather Reporter.
If Europe wishes to unite with Uncle Sam, she must promise to
love,' honor, and repay. New Haven Union.
$12 Silk Shirts, with tax..
$5 Madras Gold Shirts .. ..
$5 Madras Golf Shrits
$2.50 Percale Golf Shirts
$2 2-pocket Work Shirts.
1 .....$7.95
.,. $2.50
$2.50
: $1.75
$1.00
Canvas Gloves, per pair . -15c
Fine White Handkerchiefs 2 for 25c
New Lot of Styleplns Suits $30 to $35
Boys' and Men's Overalls at the lowest price since 1915.
AN APPEAL TO COMMON SENSE
San Francisco Bulletin
Will Irwin, a San Francisco writer, who earned the title of "Ace
of Correspondents" for his services in France, has written a remark
able book, "The Next War: An Appeal to Common Sense," in which
he sounds a warning to America and the world in general. It is not
known whether President Harding has read this little volume, but
if he has, the fact might well account for his change of attitude in
regard to the Borah resolution, requesting him to open negotiations
with Great Britain and Japan for an agreement to curtail naval con
struction. It is a book of facts and figures, so presented that they speak for
themselves and tell the whole story. By means of comparisons and
contrasts, Irwin puts the breath of life into statistics and converts
them from inanimate figures into moving pictures. .
For instance, he prints a picture of a proposed aircraft carrier,
estimated to cost $26,000,000 and writes underneath:
The amount of money two such ships cost would provide an increase
of $800 a year for five years in the salaries of 13,(XX) school teachers.
It is possible we shall have to do without propertly paid teachers in
order to prepare adequately for the next war.
Another picture is that of a clock illustrating the cost of the
World war during its last year. The total cost a day for all countries
was $240,000,000 that is, the direct cost, and not the destruction of
civil property. Underneath is written :
The money the World war cost for a single hour during the last
year would build ten schools costing $1,000,000 each.
The money it cost for a single day would build in each of the forty
eight states two hospitals costing $500,000 each; two $1,000,000 high
schools in each state; 300 recreation centers, with gymnasiums and
swimming pools, costing $300,000 each ; and there would be left $6,000,
000 to promote industrial education.
The Revolutionary war, the war of 1812, the Mexican war, Civil
war and Spanish-American war cost altogether only $5,842,000,000,
as against $22,625,000,000 for our part in the late war. The actual
expenditures of the United States for the fiscal year 1919-20 (ex
elusive of loans to European governments) were : Pensions, interest
and other expenses arising from past wars, $2,890,000,000; army and
navy (preparations lor luture wars;, i,.i4.iKMj.u(.M; primary gov
ernment functions, $220,000,000; public works, $85,000,000 ; research,
education, public health, and development, $59,000,000.
The cost of all wars, from 179:J to 1910, was $23,000,000.000 : the
cost of the World war was $186,000,000,000. If there is to be a next
war, and the cost is to be proportionately progressive, universal
bankruptcy will be inevitable.
But all this takes no account of the fact that in the last war
nearly 10,000,000 soldiers died in battle, and from 2,000,000 to 3,000,
000 were permanently disabled.
Some thought bestowed upon such facts and figures as these
may have determined the course of President Harding in withdraw
ing his opposition to the Borah resolution, that is now almost certain
to be adopted. It does not call upon America or any other nation to
begin disarming, but it seeks to provide the machinery whereby the
nations can call a halt to the policy of increasing armaments that are
sure to result in another war.
Senator Borah was an irreconcilable opponent of the peace treaty
and the League of Nations, but he is doing his best to live down the
evil reputation of having sacrificed the national interests and the in
terests of all humanity in order to play a political game at the last
elections. The purpose of his fight was achieved when Woodrow
AVilson was deprived of the honor of placing America at the head
of the nations in a plan for the preservation of world peace, but that
position is still open to America, and the Borah resloution is a prac
tical step in that direction.
Incidentally, it may be noted that the turn of events in regard
to the limitation of armaments bears out the prediction made by
Mark Sullivan in the Bulletin in the early part of last week. Sulli
van then said: "There is hardly a man in congress who doesn't be
lieve that within a measurable distance ahead of us there is going to
be some kind of an association of nations for the prevention of future
wars."
A conference of America,' Great Britain and Japan on the limita
tion of naval building paves the way for that association, and Presi
dent Harding's virtual acceptance of the Borah resolution, though
seemingly a change of front, is consistent with his action in appoint
ing a representative to the Supreme Council. Both steps are equiv
alent to a repudiation of the Knox resolution, regarded as a sufficient
method of making peace.
on
ALL TOGETHER
L-WiimMJ
jjj. .
1 j
INSURANCE ANNUAL STATEMENT
A. COHN, President
Jt
Of the British General Ins. Co., Ltd, for
the Year Ending December 31, 1920
Buy a
Willard
Perhaps you're too busy for
battery details. All you want
to know is that the battery
you buy will give service. j
What's the answer? Buy a
Willard Threaded Rubber Bat
tery. AT,
The plates in it are insulated
not merely separated.
Threaded Rubber Insulation
doesn't warp, crack, check,
puncture or carbonize. It out
lasts the battery plates.
Get a line on the actual sav
ing Willard Threaded Rubber In
sulation makes possible. Drive
around.
Paid-up capital $ 200.000.00
Gross assets . 797,964.50
Liabilities, except capital
Net surplus
Income
Premiums
Other sources
2i2.864.54
524,837.96
ieJU Al inrrosB and
! u J-u l ma iiiiiiTi nirrnir rs rim MAM -ilflm
iii 1 1 ! rr rrr r t r
,
4 315,242.88; ... . .. .
L Wnrlrt wm In ilnio
.$ 145,519.191 WWVl IIVUU "VIIV V.
i
i
TO KMKf
US TOUB MASK AND AOPMSS, WtWBU. MAS. YOU
UXmUTID AST SOOCUT AND TDM WITHOUT ANT COST TO
SCHOOL DDWWn ST THKLARGUT i
FAMOUS AKTBTS
and Local
ORAWM - r-i
. CKAtON rOBVTAAnA
Total income, 1920
Expenditures
Paid policy holders .$
Other expenditures
Total expenditures, 1920
Business, 1920
Risks written $65,861,800.00
Premiums thereon 313,961.14
Losses incurred 71,886.12
HENRY W. BROWN. Secretary oi and
for HENRY W. BROWN & CO., U.
S. Managers.
INSURANCE ANNUAL STATEMENT
Of the Reliance Insurance Company of j
Pittsburgh, ..Pennsylvania, for the i
Year Ending December 31, 1920.
Capital (paid up in cash).-$ 1.000,000.00
Assets 14,082,547.92
Liabilities, exclusive of
capital and net surplus 12,765,831.53
Income
Premiums ...., .$ 6,494.073.35
Other sources , .. . 782,212.45
Carson Electric Shop
Opposite Arlington Hotel
Total income, 1920 $ 7,27685.80
Expenditures
Paid policy holders .$ 996,592.84
Dividends to policy holders 295,245.74
Other expenditures 3,183,861.49
Total expenditures. 1920......$ 4,475,700.07
Business. 1920
Risks written $72758,554.00
Premiums thereon . 2,301,448.58
Losses incurred - 675,730.16
Nevada Business
Numlier of risks written 8
Amount of risks written....? 11,126.00
Premiums received 934J7
Loses paid None
Losses incurred . None
Number of policies inforce
December 31. 1920 34
Amount of said policies $ 44,500.00
A. E. BRAUN.
Vice President
YOUNG men like
the trim lines and
smartly designed pro
portions of Born
Tailored - to Measure
clothes.
m
And they like the way
a Born Tailored suit
holds its style; the way
it fits; the way it wears.
Then,too,Born prices
are within easy reach
of modest incomes; an
important considera
tion these days
INSURANCE ANNUAL STATE
MENT Of the Kansas City Life Insurance Co.,
Kansas City, Hon for the Yeai fad
ing December 31, 1920.
Batteries
From Philadelphia Public Ledger
Each in his place does his bit, day by day, and the sura total is
the world's work
If you fall down on your job, the job falls down too. The work
depends on the workman.
You may think you bulk so small on the landscape that it makes
no difference whether you stand or fall. But as one thinks and does,
the millions think and do.
By every act or failure to act wc affect our eompanj our city,"
our nation, our eartn, in our own time ana even to remote posterity.
But we oughn't to let that thought scare us. All that each of us
can do is to "carry on," in the spot where his duty has set him down,
to the best of his ability. . . , .
Subscribe for the Appeal.
Capital (paid up in eash)..$ 209,00000
Assets 17,580,444.26
Liabilities, exclusive of
capital and net surplus.. 17,088,880.87
Income
Premiums .$ 6334,22626
Other sources 1,099,328.94
Total income, 1920.....
.$ 7,933,555.20
Expenditures
Paid policy holders ...$ 1,372,601.55
Dividends 304,392.06
Other expenditures 2,470,134.11
Total expenditures, 1920...$ 4,147,127-72
Business. 1920
Risks written :.....53,981 ,633.00
Premiums thereon . 1,942,354.41
Losses incurred 1,120,348.82
Nevada Business
Number of risks written 9
Amount of risk written .$ 182,15200
Premiums received ... 27,487.33
Losses paid 00
Losses incurred 00
Number of oolicies in force
force December 31. 1920.. 513
Amount of said policies.......! 1,210,003.00
C. N. SEARS,
Secretary.
Jos. Smyth
Haberdasher
1 HENRY ELROY
Landscape Gardener and Floral Artist
t Landscape gardening work in general, for public and pri-
vate gardens.
Pruning and grafting of trees and flowers.
T Landscape architecture in different ways and plans for
beatifying your home grounds.
Builder of pergolas, tennis court, water ponds, etc.
2 Scientific planing and estimating on your new homestead.
t TEN YEARS OF STUDY AROUND THE WORLD IN
I ; GARDENS
X Leave' Your Orders at the Golden West Hotel South Carson Street
J-AAAAAAAAAAAAAAA.. A A A A M A A I
TTTTTTTTTTTTTf Tf"""
Carson
Carson City
Valley
Bank
Nevada
I CAPITAL, FULLY PAID
150,000.00
OFFICERS
George Wingfield, Prea.
W. H. Doyle, Vice-Pres.
H. G. Humphrey, V-Pres.
H. C. Clapp, Cashier
G. B. Spradling, Ast C'shr.
DIRECTOKS
Geo. Wingfield
W. H. Doyle
U. G. Humphrey
H. C. Clapp
Chas. J. Rulison
t
This bank wPJ receive deposit, buy or sell foreign drafts, make
loans and do a general banking business. Interest at the rate of
4 per cent per annum will be paid on time Certificates of Deposits
and Savings Accounts. United States Depository for Postal
Saving Funds.
Imported and Domestic Cigars Pipes, Smoking
Tobacco, Gigarettef , Everything for the Smoker
of Taste Pure Goods ant Courteous Treatment
PHONE
G 3
H. J. Vaughan
PHONE
6 3
Tobacconist-Newsdealer-Billiard Parlor
All San Francisco Dailies--Hot Butterkist
Pop Cora Daily-Peanuts and Confection,
Fresh-OppositePost Office-Telephonett

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