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The White Pine news. [volume] (Ely, Nev.) 1906-1910, November 26, 1907, Image 1

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ESTABLISHED IN 1868. ELY, WHITE PINE COUNTY, NEVADA, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 1907. THIRTY-NINTH YEAR
PAY ROLL
Approximately $175,000
Per Month Is Being
Distributed In Camp.
MORE MENjOE WANTED
In Various Lines—Boosfers Club
Hears Good Reports—Members
Bring Good News from Outside
An interesting meefing was held
liy the Ely Boosters’ club at, the stock
exchange last night. The attendance
was fair, and general interest, mani
fested in discussion.
It was contended at the meeting
that affairs in the district are very
far from in such shape as to justify
statement that they are in had condi
tion. It was shown that there are
at this time more than 1,500 men on
regular pay rolls In the district,
drawing an aggregate of $(i,000 per
day in wages, or approximately
$175,000 per month, the greater
part of which is turned into the reg
ular channels of local trade.
.1. II. Wattson, chairman of the
committee on information and em
ployment, reported that working men
■ cannot he had for odd jobs, that
miners are wanted in a number of
properties, and that he lias a call at
this time for two expert timber fram
ers, and for other classes of labor.
It was stated that miners and other
workingmen who left, the camp some
time ago in search of better districts
are coming hack with reports that
Ely is the peer of the best camps in
the country and that opportunities
for remunerative positions are more
frequent here than in any other cam])
in the mining country. Carpenters
are not unemployed at this time, and
there are places Tor a few more who
can get good positions at standard
wages.
Two members of the club who re
turned from different parts of the
country during the last few days re
ported that Ely holds the center of
the stage in the minds of investors
at this time. One reported that
throughout California dozens of per
sons had asked him of conditions
hero, and expressed the belief thal
this was the best and steadiest camp
in the west. The other member,
who had been in Salt Bake, stated
that. Investors, capitalists and others
with large interests here have the
most implicit confidence in the ulti
mate greatness and prosperity of the
camp and of the district.
I XIVKItSITY MEN IX NUMBER
About Fifty Have licon Heard From
in District—Preparations for
Next Dinner.
Responses which have been re
ceived to date by Chairman Plate of
the committee appointed to look up
university men in the district and
bring them together for the next din
ner at the Steptoe, on the night of
the 7th, give occasion for belief that
there will lie at least 50 college men
gathered around the banquet board.
The object of tlie gathering at the
next dinner, as has heretofore been
announced, are to pass an enjoyable
evening and to discuss the organiza
tion of a university club, with which
organization to work with, those uni
versity men who have interested
themselves believe much could be ac
complished which would tend to
make life more pleasurable in the
camp. All university men who have
not to this time done so are request
ed to communicate with Mr. Plate at
once, sending their names and the
names of their colleges. In response
they will receive invitations to the
dinner. On the night of the latter
. arrangements made provide for a
’bus leaving the Steptoe at close of
the banquet for Ely.
VISITING THE SCHOOLS.
Trustees Are Visiting: the General
tirades in Ely aiul Ely City.
The hoard of school trustees, com
prising II. A. Comins, Allen C. Bragg
and Alex McDonald, visited the High
school yesterday and observed the
work of the pupils in that depart
ment, under the supervision of Piln
cipnl Cullen and Mrs. Bragg.
The members expressed themselves
as being pleased with the work if
the teachers and pupils They will
inspect the work of tne other grades
tomorrow. . During their visit yester
day, Mr. Comins gave an interesting
and helpful talk to the pupils, im
pressing on them the value of school
work and of education.
LETTERS ,i POSTOFFICE.
List of Those Awaiting Claimants at
the Ely Office.
Unclenmed letters are at the Ely
Postoffice for the following: Mrs.
I ray Allen, W. O. Alhstrom, Bucchesi
' Callisto, Gomoto Fuontomm, H. B.
Harper, Mrs. Hugo Hoefer, Jack Ire
land, Anders Cns. Jensen, Franco
Bopez, W. J. lvlagill. Dr. Jeremiah
Maher, Mrs. D. S. McGill, T. E. Mc
Dermott, Wm. Meiklejohn, Zepermo
Monteljans, J. U. Palmer (2), W.
W. Padilen, A. W. Paesfalio, Wm.
Riley, R. A. Ringer, C. G. Smith, H.
C. Ejmith, Frank Swank, S. A. Wam
bzolt, S. D. Wagoner, Jack West,
Clifford II. Wise.
W. B. GRAHAM, P. M.
jij^ LEGISLATIVE ACTIO IN
ELY, NEVADA, NOV. 25.
GOVERNOR JOHN SPARKS,
('ARSON CITY, NEVADA.
HONORABLE SIR:—INQUIRIES MADE BY Tills PAPER OCCA
SION RELIEF THAT A MAJORITY OF THE TAXPAYERS OF TILs
PORTION OF WHITE PINE COUNTY FAVOR A SPECIAL SESSION OF
THE LEGISLATURE FOR THE EXTENSION OF TIME OF TAXES BE
COMING DELINQUENT. THE NEWS FINDS, THROUGH MANY INTER
VIEWS, BELIEF PREVALENT THAT WHILE THIS DISTRICT IS IX
BETTER CONDITION PHYSICALLY THAN MANY OTHER PORTIONS
OF THE STATE, THERE IS NEVERTHELESS A SCARCITY OF CUR
RENCY AND THE GETTING OF COIN, REQUIRED UNDER THE LAW
FOR THE PAYMENT OF TAXES, WILL BE IMPOSSIBLE FOR SOME
AND WORK A HARDSHIP ON MANY OTHERS.
THE WHITE PINE NEWS.
Telegram
to SPARKS
Based on Findings of the
News in Interviews as
To Extra Session
Governor John Sparks of Nevada
has {luring the last several days been
sounding feeling in the state with re
gard (o the advisability of a special
session of the legislature. Returns
Governor Sparks may receive from
the queries he has put out will de
termine him as to course he will pur
sue. If he finds reason for belief
that the majority of the people wish
extension of the time of taxes be
coming delinquent, he will summon
the legislature in special session, is
suing call probably on Friday or
Saturday. The legislature can dis
pose of the matter in one day.
As result of inquiries made by the
News yesterday in this district, the
telegram given at the head of this
article was sent by it. to Governor
Sparks. Probably a hundred people
were seen yesterday by the News and
questioned as to their views regard
ing the extra session. Approach was
made in conversational manner and
replies received were straight out ex
pressions. The large majority were
unequivocally in favor of an extra
session for the single purpose of ac
tion in the delinquency matter. The
expression of opinion secured is con
sidered to have had range sufficient
to give an excellent idea of the feel
ing in the community.
As lias been shown In these col
umns recently the payment of taxes
on property in this district has to this
time been in advance, both in number
and amounts of money involved, of
the same period of last year. How
ever, it is to be remembered that
there is this year a great deal more
taxable wealth in the hands of many
more individuals in the district than
there was last year. The fact also
remains that payments to this time
have been very largely from the im
mediate property owners about, the
county seat and that the more distant
precincts are yet to be heard from.
The outside people, it is to be con
sidered also, will have more diffi
culty In securing coin for the pay
ment of their taxes than has been
experienced in the city.
Among those seen yesterday, the
News quotes the more prominent who
gave divergent views. Interviews,
with these were as follows:
Arthur R Witcher, cashier First Na
tional bank:
“I believe at this time that the
passage of such a measure, under ex
isting circumstances would be a good
thing for the taxpayer and that the
state would not be injured.
Gail Hoag, Manager Ely Investment
company:
“It is a question in my mind if the
legislature could be called into spe
cial session at a lower cost to the
state than the actual payment of the
penalty of 10 per cent.
“It is a straight question of wheth
er the game is worth the candle?
“Would the taxpayers have to pay
more for the extra session than they
would have to pay in penalties for
non-payment?”
Tex Rickard:
“I have been told, and so under
stand it, that if there is such a bill
passed as to relieve taxpayers of the
burden of an assessment, of 10 per
cent, penalty for non-payment of
taxes, that the money will not come
in until spring.
“I am also told that there is not
sufficient money in the treasury to
keep the schools of the county open
to the end of the term, without draw
ing on the taxes already collected or
collectable on this assessment.
“If in any way the passage of such
a bill would affect the schools and
cause them to be closed, T would cer
tainly oppose such a measure. Noth
ing should be done in any way to
hinder the good work of the schools
of the county.”
C. P. Castle, general manager Gra
ham Mercantile company:
“I think that the calling of an ex
tra session of the legislature to pass
a bill to suspend the assessment of a
penalty of 1 0 per cent on delinquent
taxpayers for this year would be a
wise move", in view of the present
shortage of ready money.
“The payment in cash of heavy
taxes will work a hardship on the
heavier taxpayers, who will have dif
Acuity in securing legal tender in
the amounts required.
"It is a question in my mind if the
tender of a certified check is not a
legal tender for the payment of
taxes, and it is a question if (ho tax
collector can refuse, under the law,
to accept such certified checks. I
believe that in the event a test case
were made, the person making such
tender could win in the courts.
"The entire state is suffering in
the same way at this time, from a
shortage of ready money and it is no
more than right, that the state should
recognize existing conditions, and
meet them, affording such relief as
they can afford at this time.”
THANKSGIVING EVE DANCE.
Ladies of Catholic Church Have Com
pleted .Arrangements for Joy
ous Time.
Preparations have been concluded
for the Thanksgiving eve ball to be
given tomorrow night at the roller
skating rink by the Ladies’ Altar so
ciety of the Catholic church. Noth
ing has been overlooked to make the
affair a great success, both from a
social and from a financial stand
point.
The proceeds from the ball will be
used to furnish the parochial resi
dence, located at the rear of the
church on Murry street. The church
now has a resident pastor, Hev.
Father Sheehan, and it is the desire
of the Altar society to place this
building in readiness for occupancy
at as early a date as possible.
The committee in charge of the
serving of refreshments have com
pleted their work, and state that this
feature will be one of the most pleas
ing of the entire evening. The floor
is in perfect condition and every
thing possible will be done to make
guests comfortable.
LIQUOR DEALERS PROTEST.
Organization Is Under Way Among
Saloon Men to Eight License
Ordinance.
A number of the retail liquor deal
ers of Ely have taken steps looking
to the organization of a liquor deal
ers’ association. The first, object of
the proposed association will be to
oppose the ordinances which hequlre
the payment of heavy local licenses,
on the ground that the tax demanded
is exorbitant.
Attorneys Anthony Jurich and
George AV. Devecmon are now look
ing into the matter and it is believed
that one of the dealers will be se
lected to oppose the payment of the
tax now required, in order to make
a test cost in the courts. It is
though that the organization may
spread to other cities, and that a
state organization may develop, for
the purpose of fighting all laws and
ordinances that are considered op
pressive by the liquor dealers.
PUBLIC SCHOOL EXERCISES.
Pupils Will Engage in Thanksgiving
Exorcises Tomorrow Afternoon.
Thanksgiving exercises will be
held in the public schools of Ely and
Ely City tomorrow afternoon, under
the direction of the various teachers.
An hour's program will be given in
each of the grades.
An interesting program will be
given by the pupils in the Ely City
school, under the direction of Miss
Parker. Parents and the public in
general are invited to attend the ex
ercises.
HUY CLAIMS.
Property Near Lane City Changes
Hands—Will Develop.
A third interest in 1.1 claims, in
the Robinson district was transferred
yesterday for a consideration of $],
(Irtfl, from John Verzan, Lewis Pieol
lo. John Gianolo and Frank Hessello.
of Lane City, to Joseph Derioo, P.
Massa and John Foseno, also of Lane
City.
The owners of the property will be
gin development, which will be car
ried to the extent their treasury will
stand.
“SPEAKING OF BALLOONING”—
I--1-1
Ely Giroux Extension President Says
Money Will Be Forthcoming by
16th—Pleased With Property.
A. (!. Maguan, president of the Ely
Giroux Extension Copper company,
returned yesterday to his headquar
ters in Denver, following some days
spent in the district with reference
to affairs of his company.
As a result of thorough examina
tion he made of ihe holdings of Iho
company, in company with an engi
neer, and of examination of the sev
eral drill holes which constitute the
exploration work done on the ground
to tills time, Mr. Maguan readied
conclusion that the company lias
without doubt excellent prospects for
the making of much success and re
turned to Denver with higher en
thusiasm and more confidence as to
the future Ilian he has before enter
tained.
in connection with the work he
did while here, Mr. Maguan got in
touch witli local stockholders and
with the interests associated with the
company in Denver, with outcome of
announcement prior lo liis departure
(hat all debts of (he company in the
district of every character would lie
squared and (iie now year started
with clean books. Ills expectation at
the time of li is departure was that
by the 1(!th of the month lie would
have arrangements completed and
cash oil hand for the tilting of all ob
ligations.
It is known that (lie drill holes on
the property of Ely Giroux Extension
have shown very favorable conditions
for the opening of important, ore
bodies through the sinking.and drift
ing that engineers have already made
plans for and which with recovery of
the country from the strenuous sea
son that lias lately been passed
through will doubtless he carried out.
MAKKS TAKES HECKEK KEEK
Agency Passes to His Hands—He
tlrcs From Active Saloon
Management.
J. It. Marks yesterday closed a deni
whereby he takes over the agency
in this district of the flecker Grow
ing company. The latter has stor
age houses in Ely City, which were
yesterday turned over to Mr. Marks.
He will have his headquarters there,
beside maintaining offices in Ely, and
will at once undertake improvements
at the Ely City buildings which will
enable him to handle the business of
bis agency with much more facility
than it lias boon conducted in the
past.
The Becker agency lias heretofore
been handled by the Ely Mercantile
company. The latter firm has for
some time been unable to give the
business the attention deserved, be
cause of the demand upon the time
of the Mercantile people in handling
their more important interests, and
the transfer to Mr. Marks therefore
came about. Mr: Marks in taking up
the wholesale business retires from
active connection with saloon inter
ests he has, the management passing
to iiis partner, .1. E. Talbott. Marks
is a hustler and from now on Becker
beer is likely to lie more popular
among those with whom the brown
is a favorite beverage.
• ADAMS ,11'HV FAILS •
• •
• TO ItlCACII AOItFFMFNT •
• - •
• SPOKANE, Nov. 25.—The •
• jury In the Steve Adams mill-- •
• dei case was discharged at 5 15 •
• o'clock this afternoon, being 1111- •
• able to agree on a verdict after •
• being out since 8:20 o'clock •
• Saturday night. The jury stood •
• eight for acquittal and four for •
• conviction. There was no •
• change in the ballot from ihe •
• first. Attorney Harrow made a •
• motion that the defendant be •
• released on bonds, arguncnt on •
• which will be heard later. •
• •
FOR THE MET
ON THANKSGIVING
Gun Club Arranges Two-Day Shoot
Tomorrow and Thursday—The
Prizes.
What promises to lie the most in
teresting rifle contest ever held in
this district has been scheduled to
take place tomorrow and Thursday,
on the range of the Ely (lun club. At
this contest the best rifle experts of
the district will compete for a large
number of prizes, which will become
the permanent property of the win
ners.
The contest wilt cover two days,
and will begin tomorrow afternoon
at 1 o’clock on the club's regular
range south of the city. Perhaps the
most interesting feature of the con
test will lie the live turkey shoot.
This contest will be at GO yards, with
rifles. The birds will be protected
by an iron bulwark, with the excep
tion of the heads, which will appear
as the center of a six-inch bull’s eye.
There will be 20 birds in the prize
list, but a number of shooters have
agreed to allow their birds to be
shot for again in (lie event they win.
The target shooting will be at
range of 200 yards, and all contests
will lie open to any marksmen who
wish to enter, regardless of their
membership or non-membership in
the club. The purpose is not only to
give a good line of clean sport, but
to get the marksmen of the camp to
gether for these tests of skill. The
following prizes have been donated:
First prize, gold medal, to become
the permanent property of the marks
man making the highest general
score during the two days’ meet, do
nated by Drowning Brothers, Ogden.
Second prize, silver cup, to become
permanent property of marksman
making second highest general aver
age during the meet; donated by
Mayor F. M. Clark and A. C. I.ind
skog.
Other prizes have been donated by
the following: Nne Brothers, hunt
ing coat; Northern hotel, six bottles
Mumm’s Extry Dry; Veteran saloon,
six bottles bonded whisky; Mint liar.
18 bottles beer; Dial & Allison, 12
bottles beer; Thomas If. O'Neill, 12
bottles beer; Capital saloon, six bot
tles Old Crow whisky; Southern Club,
six bottles Mumm’s Extra Dry; Apex
saloon, 100 cigars; Oaks bar, 100
cigars.
The club now has a membership
of 52, among whom are some of the
best all-around marksmen with ride,
shot-gun and pistol in the state.
TO POSTPONE
Probable That It Will Not Come Up
Until in January—May AsK
Change of Venue.
NEW YORK. Nov. 25.—The sec
ond trial of Harry Kendall Thaw,
set for one week from today, will
again lie postponed, and there is lit
tle chance that it will lie called until
some date well along in January.
The decision In ask for a postpone
ment lias been agreed to by both
sides. *11 is due partly to the fact
that Hie task of selecting a jury
would lie made doubly hard by the
approach of (lie holidays and the
prospect, of the talesmen of spending
both Christmas and New Year's day
locked up under the care of the court
bailiffs and also to the fact that
Thaw's counsel has applied to the
court for permission to inspect the
secret evidence presented before the
lunacy commission during the prog
ress of the first trial.
As tin added cause for delay there
Is a rumor that the attorneys repre
senting Thaw may apply for a change
of venue, declaring a fair trial for
their client in New Yorw county Is
Impossible. Such a move, if made,
would bn based on the alleged un
friendly attitude of many of the local
newspapers and the extent to which
INTRODUCE
MEASURE
Bartlett Adheres to Idea
Regarding Omission
Of Annual Work
Congressman (leorge Hartlett left
for Washington Saturday to sit for
the iirst time as the representative of
Nevada in congress. Mr. Hartlett is
going to introduce Ills bill to remit
the assessment work on mining
claims for the year 1907.
There lias been considerable con
troversy about the proposed measure,
and Mr. Hartlett has received many
letters from all kinds of people, both
for and against the hill. lie says
that those who are fortunate enough
to have had their work done are to
be congratulated, but how a measure
to relieve their less fortunate fellows
Is going to hurt them is beyond his
power of perception. Mr. Hartlett
outlines his reasons for the bill as
follows:
“The bill is designed to protect
I those who have held and mined prop
erty for years, Imt who through the
present financial stringency, are not
able to obtain from the banks or
otherwise money enough to have that
work done this year. It Is surely not
designed for the benefit of the capi
talist the accepted designation for a
man of large wealth—for the man of
wealth, the man able to command
money, is able to have the wark done,
and. for the most part, doubtless has
had It done already. In proposing
the measure I had in my mind's eye
the benefit of men who have for a
long, long time taken their part in
the development of this state, and to
whom the enforcement of the provis
ion requiring the work done this year
would mean practically confiscation
of property on which they had ex
pended much money, time and
trouble."
Congressmen Are Rapidly
Assembling at Wash
ington For Next Session
TALK OVER MEASURES
Good Working Understanding Ex
pected Before. Opening—Cen
tral Bank Plan Favored.
WASHING I ON. Nov. 25.—Today
Hilda a large number of congressmen
gathered in the city in readiness to
enter upon the work of the session
which will open on Monday next.
I 'resent indications are that the num
ber of members on hand for the op
ening will lie larger than in many
years. Those who are on the ground
are holding conferences daily with
the president and mouthers of the
caliinet and among themselves. It is
Indicated that there will lie a pretty
good working iimlfratnndlng coached
before I he gavel falls.
Details of many new projects for
improving the currency are being
submitted to the president and Sec
retary Cortelyoit and are receiving
such attention as the other exigen
cies of the financial situation per
mit. Secretary Cortelyoit Is a good
listener, and usually digests quickly
the essential parts of the various
plans which are submitted to hint.
Measures refilling to the currency
which are being discussed among
bankers and Incoming members of
congress may lie roughly grouped un
der four heads, a central hank of is
sue, a central organization of the ex
isting national hanks, the issue of ad
ditional circulation against various
classes of I mads other than United
Slates bonds and I lie Issue of cir
culation upon general assets with
the security of a guaranty fund.
The project of a central hank based
upon the general outlines of the
lirnk of France or the Imperial bank
of Germany has apparently been at
tracting more attention of late than
any previous time in recent years.
Senator llnnsbroitgli of North Dako
ta, who is a member of the finance
committee, has announced that he
will Introduce a bill for such an insti
tution.
DIG I.UMISFIt MILLS ULOSIO.
Nearly every mill in the Sierra Ne
vada mountains lias been closed down
for the winter. The mills of the
Ueiio Mill & Lumber company at
Loynlton closed Monday, the mills
of the Marsh Lumber company, also
at Loyal ton, cose on Saturday,
and Truckee Lumber company closed
it.; mills on Thursday, and the Sierra
Nevada mills on Monday. There is
now mu a large mill in the mountains
t nrning out a foot of lumber, and
the people will have to be content
with the lumber olready piled In the
ii in her yards, as no more will lie se
cured from the forests this winter.
The men in the forests refused to
work unless paid in cash, and as the
gold and silver coins are being held
(Continued on page four.)
tin1 evidence was print‘ d anJ read in
tills county. District Attorney Je
rome will seriously oppose the grant
ing of a change in the scene of I he
trial.

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