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The White Pine news. [volume] (Ely, Nev.) 1906-1910, April 16, 1909, DAILY EDITION, Image 1

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ASMJUAItU mss UmiUlES ANU ALL IIIE NLWA Ul MIL WURLUi UALAILJI LUHPLR LMIIIF
fc the DAILY AND THK WEEKLY NEWS THE BEST NEWSPAPER PUBLICATIONS IN EASTERN NEVADA. INDISPENSABLE IF YOU WOULD KEEP ABREAST WITH WHAT IS GOING ON IN THE WORLD
WHITE PIKE ._1
(ESTABLISHED IN 1868. DAILY EAST ELY, WHITE PINE COUNTY, NEVADA, FRIDAY, APRIL 16, 1909._VOL. XLI. NO. 242
ggp a
l Troubles of Turkey Add
1 ed to by Massacre of
■ Armenians—Proceeds
1 With Terrible Results
I’ONNTAXTIXOPLH I* %<i\l\ \S
snil.Vti THE NOICMAL—NOW
IIKIJKVKI) THAT RECENT Ml’
TINV KMilNEKREII HV si I.T AN
DERUN. April 15 The Lokul
Vnzeiger today published a Const an
itnople dispatch in which its corre
spondent says that there are good
reasons for the belief that the sultan
himself organized the recent mili
tary mutiny.
it Is known that for some time the
-gjll.au has been desirous that a
change should occur lu the cabinet,
atnong the deputies and in the army
.aid navy, but It has also been known
that direct steps in this direction on
ills part would lead to embarrassing
developments. The belief now is
ihat In the mutiny of the troops the
sultan found a way to accomplish
Ills wishes without involving him
.4)1 f.
MAKSACIli; IN riMMJKEs*.
CONSTANTINOPLE, April 15. A
massacre of Armenians Is in progress
today at Mersina, a seaport of Asia
Minor on the Mediterranean Ue
, ause of the murder of two Moslems
by an Armenian and the subsequent
tad that the assassin was not ap
prehended, caused the Mohammedan
population of Mersina, which counts
,(‘total of 10,00® Inhabitants, to take
the law into their own hands, i'ol
Igwing a street gathering at which
this decision was reached, they at
tacked the Armenian quarter*.
Christian communities of Mersina
are appealing to the consuls here for
help In strenuous telegrams filed to
day in which the situation is pic
tured as one likely to result in a
general massacre of frightful pro
portions.
The trouble ut Mersina is in no
way connected with the political up
rising In Constantinople of the last
two days, it involves recrudescence
of the Armenian question, which is
religious ami racial and lias noth
ing to do with the Internal politics
of Turkey.
yi'IKT IN <X»NHTANTINOl'I,K.
CONSTANTINOPLE, April K>.
The Turkish capital Is again assum
ing a normal aspect and there was
little outward evidence today <>f the
political ferment that marked the
previous two days.
The appointment of Zazim Pasha
to the commandenthlp of the first
army corps. It Is believed, will have
a good effect toward restoring order
and discipline In the army, where, as
recent occurrences fully demonstrai
,.d, it has been sadly lacking.
TOItHKON ItlOTEItS AltE
SI >1 VIA III LA IlKALT W 11 II
Court Martial Followed »»> Exern
I lolls—I lead I todies in «>|icn
Trench—More to Follow.
TEKJtEON. Mex.. April 15. The
ljodies of fourteen men, summarily
shot to death after a drumhead court
martial, lit' uncovered in a trench
on the outskirts of this city.
Troops are in command of the city
and it is believed not to be unlikely
that a dozen prisoners now tinder
guard may lie executed in the morn
ing and placed In the common trench
along with the bodies of those still
awaiting the final rites of burial
EXPECTS A III SH.
Contractor W. E. Meyers stated
last evening that a number of new
buildings were to be erected in the
district in the immediate future,
plans and specifications having al
ready been drawn. He expects to
see a Idg revival in Ids line within
the next two months.
• ••••••••••••••a
• •
• TO riUHTiAIM JOAN •
• •
• OI-’ AIM' PHOTF.CTItFSS •
• HOME, April 15.—The fluid •
• ceremony of the I tent ideation of •
• Joan of Arc, takes place at St. •
• Peter’s next Sunday. Follow- •
• iiig the reading of the dec is-e •
• the pope will descent! to veil- •
• orate the portrait of the Maiden. •
• After April 15, Joan of Are may •
• l»e publicly venerated and altars •
• may Is- dedicated to her in all •
• churches. •
• Tile pope shortly will publish •
• a decree proelainiinn the Maid •
• the proteelress of the Catholics •
• of France. Forty pilgrims are •
• exported to come to Home for •
• tile ceremony. •
• •
• ••••••••••••••a
NEW V. S. Jl IXiF.
WASHINGTON. April 15. The
president today sent to the senate
the nomination of Robert S. Jlean to
be I’nitod States district judge for
Oregon.
GOES 10 SEE
UETI ItMMI TO WASHimiTON
THE PRESIDENT SUM'S IX NEW
Y(MtK TO ATTEND THEATEH
WITH Jilts. TAET.
NEW YORK, April 15. President
Taft left the city this morning to at
tend the meeting of Yale Corpora
tion in New Haven. I’pon his return
here this evening In* attended a the
ater, after which he took the mid
night train to Washington.
The theater party was composed <>f i
the president. Mrs. Taft and a mini-1
her of relatives. The performance^
was, “If 1 Were a King.'’ by E. H. |
Sol hern, at Daly's theater: The pres
ident. Is very fond of the theater and
expressed much pleasure from the'
presentation witnessed. The house
was parked to its utmost capacity.
Mr. Taft has been putting In many
long hours of work since his Inaugu
ration and today's brief respite from
official duties, wits decidedly agree
able to him. lie usually passes from
eight to nine hours a day In the ex-j
ecutlve offices of the White House
jnnd rarely eats luncheon.
CINCINNATI. April 15.—In the
Masonic temple here last night. Pres
ident Tart was unanimously elected
it member of Kilwinning lodge of
Masons.
NITRO GLYCERIN I At TORY I.ETS
4.0 — THREE DEAD — TOWN
THROWN IN T4 > PANIC HY
SHOCK—EEI.T A."* JllbES.
SIT.1.1 VAN, lud., April IB —The
nitro glycerin factory at Goodin, ill.,
across the Wabash river from this
place, was destroyed by an explo- j
sion this afternoon. Details are lack
ing, but It is reported that three j
men were killed. The shock was felt
for 35 miles, in which radius a num
ber of windows were shattered and
other small damage done, in this
city the explosion caused something
of a panic for a time.
Tito explosion destroyed nil wires
and there is now no communication
with Goodon.
INDIANAPOLIS, hid., April 15.—
Front information obtained by long
distance telephone, it Is gathered that
three men were killed in the explo
sion of the nitro glycerin plant at
Goodon. ill., this afternoon. The
plant "its blown to pieces,
Q
Aldrich to Then Present
The Republican Tariff
View to Senate and
Open Discussion There
DK.AHM Jt.vrs TO have faik fox
SIDKKATIOX—PUKSIDKNT KX
TKltS MKSKAGK IIKIIAI.F
I FIX'KM—MINORITY VIKAVS.
WASHINGTON, April 15.—The
senate committee on finance today
agreed that opening of the discus
sion of the tariff hill in the senate
should go over until Monday.
On behalf tlit* minority, Mr. Money
asked If the committee would con
sider the amendments which will he
offered by the Democrats.
The Republicans have so far de
clined to make any agreements in
advance for the amendments. It is
generally stated, however. that
amendments admitted to be of an ini- |
portant character will receive earnest
and full consideration.
Doth houses of congress were In
session today. Present prospects are ;
that Senator Aldrich will not make
a speech in explanation of the sen
ate amendments of the tarifT bill be
fore Monday next.
The president today sent to con
gress a special message on the Phil
ippine tariff clauses.
Tile message transmits the recom
mendations made by the secretary of
war for the revision of the Philip
pines tariff so as to permit of as
much customs revenue as possible for
the islands and at the same time ex
tend to the islands the principal of I
protective tarifT for the advantage
of their industries.
MINORITY REPORT.
WASHINGTON, April 18—For
more than four hours the Democratic
members of the senate conferred to
day In an effort to agree upon a
tariff policy.
After the session. Senator Culber
son, the minority leader, announced
that tile Democrats had agreed to
support an income tax amendment,
and to stand for substantial reduc
tions in schedules, and play for a de
crease In the rates on the necessaries
of life.
The decision is not binding and
tlie meeting was not entirely har
monious. Some senators admitted
frankly that they would seek protec
tion for the industries of their
states. Senator Stone spoke in favor
of his program for independence of
the Filipinos after IB years and ab
solute free trade with the islands
during that period. Senator FoRter
wus opposed to free trade with any
of the colonies. Neither of these
senators, its was apparent, could have
obtained a majority of the Democrats
for their proposition had a vote
I teen taken.
Only on one question was the con
ference agreed, and that was the in
come tax. The conference adjourned
until Friday as those present agreed
that they were not sufficiently ac
quainted with the Dill to pass judg
ment intelligently upon it.
In \lew of the criticisms made of
the tariff bill as amended by the sen-1
ate finance committee, particularly
the observation that the bill will not
produce sufficient revenues. Sen
ator Aldrich will undertake, on Mon
day, satisfactorily to explain the rev
enue features of the measure.
The senate committee had the
benefit of the advice of the best ex
perts in the government service.
These experts declare the bill as
amended by the senate will raise
much more money than appears, and
Senator Aldrich still insists that no
additional Internal taxes will be
needed.
Great dependence is placed by the
senate lawyers on the work done by
former Senator Hemenway, on be-1
half of the new senate committee on
public expenditures. Information Is
being collected by him which will be
used in paring down annual appro
priations. The senate leaders have
taken Hit' position that government
extravagance must cease and it Is re
ported that Mr. Hemenway will rec
ommend a reduction of about $35,
000,000 from the $150,000,000 of
permanent funds, and that a like
sum may be pruned from the regular
annual appropriations for the vari
ous executive departments.
PERMANENT TAKIFFCOMMI8KION
NEW YORK, April IB.—To spread
the sentiment, for the creation of a
permanent tariff commission. tb«
merchants' association of New fork,
is sending out subscription matiks to
raise funds for an edmational cam
paign.
MINERS BLAME OPERATORS
ASK FOR ANOTHER MEETING
WKIlXIK, I’ll., April 1ft.—Hefore concluding I heir convention today,
tin* coal millers derided to stund by the Intermitional union. Interna
tional Hoard Menitier Morgan has sent u note to the operator* blaming
tliem for the strike and suggesting another conference. Representatives
of the latter who arc here do not believe that the suggestion for fui-tlicj:
conference will In' considered.
UUEEN WILHELMiNA OF HOLLAND.
The wish Tor an lielr to the throne has long been uppermost In the intnds
of the people of Holland, but several times when the royal guards stood by
their rums ready to thunder the Bind news from the palace the hopes of the
people were dashed to earth. Queen Wllhelmlim probably enjoys more sin
cere affection on the part of her subjects than any other ruler In Euroi>e. She
Is now twenty nine years of age. She was married to I take Henry Frederick
of Meeklenburg-Sehw erln on Fell. 7, 1901.
MANY FAMILIES ARRIVING TO
MAKE THEIR HOMES IN CAMP
MOSTLY JOINING WORKERS AT
M'GILL—LARGE NUMBER OF
SINGLE MECHANICS ALSO COM
ING IN—ACTIVITY AHEAD.
A most notable Increase has re
cently occurred in the number of new
comers to the district. About these
the most striking feature is that they
principally represent families who
are arriving to make their homes.
The larger number of these ar
rivals have been leaving the train at
McGill to join workers who have
been there for some time, while sup
porting their families elsewhere.
Last evening there were three fam
ilies transferred at McGill to the
smelter train and on Wednesday
evening five. Not in more than two
weeks has a train passed McGill from
C’obre without leaving one or more
families.
Beside the families arriving last
evening there were about 25 mechan
ics who came in to take up work on
the erection of equipment of the new
fourth unit of the concentrator.
These men will be followed steadily
for some time by others who are be
ing employed in Salt Lake for the
work. Many of them will find per
manent positions here and remain.
It seems certain that the camp ha?
entered upon an exceedingly healthy
growth of most desirable kind which
will continue steadily from now mi
The great amount of work which
there is now to do will be steadily
augmented during the balance of the
year, while 191u will unquestionably
witness the biggest construction and
operating era in the camp that the
state has ever known.
DOLLY VARDEN CASE COMES
BEFORE GRAND JURY TODAY
ORIGINAL OWNER OF PROPERTY
IS HERE IN RESPONSE TO HI M
MONS TO APPEAR BEFORE
ItOllY—HAS LITTLE TO SAY.
N. Austin, one of the original own
ers of the Dolly Vurden property, ar
rived on last evening's train, having
been subpoenaed to appear before me
grand jury to tell what he knows
about the deal wherein a number of
stockholders are now supposed to
have lost what money they put Into
Dolly Varden stock.
Mr. Austin was Interviewed by a
News reporter last evening and in re
sponse to a question asked him as
to whether or not he had promised to
take care of the small stockholders in
the company, he said that he had
been misunderstood on that occasion,
but did not say how the misunder
standing came about. lie states that
the property is looking well, but
needs money to get on a paying basis.
Asked as to why he had given a deed
to the property when he was working
it himself under a lease from the
Dolly Vurden Co., he said he would
tell the reporter about that later.
Mr. Austin will not be alone in ap
pearing before the grand Jury today
In the Dolly Varden matter. There
are a number of other witnesses
called who will have questions to nn
swer l'hese have been engaged In
a ,(*ood deal of comment and wonder
as to final developments.
Yesterday the grand Jury is un
derstood to have been busy with the
men held for the killing which oc
curred a few weeks ago at the Vet
(“ran mine. II is not thought that
this matter has yet been gone Into
as fully as the jury intends before
reporting.
• • '
• <T>AI. MINK IIISAHTKK •
• •
• WITH TIIIIKK DKAIi •
• - •
• FAIRMONT. \V. Va., April 15 •
• —A gas explosion occurred to* •
• day ut the No. 1! shaft of the •
• mine of the George Greek Goal •
• & Iron Go. at Farmington, near •
• lien*. •
• Almost immediately following •
• the explosion the mine caught •
• lire. Three miners are known •
• to ho dead. A number of others •
• are in great |H‘ril. I .urge res- a
• cue parties aw* working heroic* •
• ally. •
• •
I
Patten Forced Into the
Pit With Furious Buy
ing Orders to Prevent
Heavy Slump in Prices
IS SLCt LSSFlIi IX ItRIXGlXti RE
ACTION WHICH TAKES OFF
MUCH OF LOSS OF RAY—RE
CLAKES HE HAS NO CORNER.
CHICAGO, April 15.—Wheat bulls
received a setback today on the
board, when the prices toppled pre
cipitatedly. July tumbled an extrem*
of 5% cents. May fell 3 Vi cent
and September 3 % cents.
Patten bought furiously all along
the line and the close showed a re
i action averaging slightly over one
] cent.
The purchases of James A. Patten
land his immediate associates during
i the final 19 minutes of today's ses
sion of the board approached seven
| million bushels of May. July and
[ September wheat.
CHICAGO, April 15. The appeal
I of Pittsburg bakers to Secretary ot
State Knox to take steps to end
{manipulation of wheat and othei
; markets excited comment today b>
James A. Patten, popularly alleged
to control the present market for th*
high priced cereal.
"In the first place,' said Mr. Pat
ten, “I don’t control the market. My
i line at no time has run over ten
1 million bushels. I have preached the
gospel of higher wheat because I saw
what was coming."
Mr. Patten at this point in the in
terview paused to open a telegrom
which had been handed him. He
read it, smiled grimly and then re
marked:
"Now, what do you think of that?
Here it is reported on the board that
j I am ’disgusted’ with the w hole wheat
I business because of criticism and am
going to get out.”
| The so-called "wheat king" tossed
the tiffending note on his desk, and
1 resumed:
| "I'm a grain trader, and 1 don’t in
tend to quit. I bought when the mar
ket looked cheap, as did others who
accepted my view, and immense pro
fits have lieen made. I have already
sold a great deal.
"For three or four years, this has
been coming. At the end of each
crop, bins were empty everywhere
With increasing population here anti
abroad, it was obvious that sooner
or later the crop of one year would
be exhausted before a new crop was
at hand. Last fall, if not earlier, i
saw it coming. I bought wheat and
my friends did likewise. The great
unthinking public here and in Eu
rope won hi not, or could not, see
what was coming. Liverpool would
not buy months ago. thinking the
prices of that day too high. Now
Europe wants 55,000.000 bushels.
The harvest was early last year. It
has been trying to cover 13 months
instead of tip* usual 12, and It can’t
tlo it. We need wheat for the mills
right here in t'hicago now.
"Here's another point. If we
hadn’t bought wheat—I mean myself
and others the price would Is
higher here than it Is. Europe
would have taken it, for the foreign
ers finally recognized the weakness
of their position. Where would the
domestic supply have come from?
We would have lieen compelled to
buy from the very Europeans we
sold to.
"I regard it as fortunate that I!
was an American who first diagnosed
crop conditions and took advantage
of it. Tills was not philanthropy. I
trade to make profits, hut this talk
of manipulation is ail rot."
ROOSEVELT HO AT PITS IN.
ADEN. April lo.—The Admiral,
with Theodore iHoosevelt and mem
bers of his party aboard, came Into
port this morning for a short stav
TO SIGN NELSON M’FARLAND
FOR 45 ROUND FIGHT JULY 4
NKW YOltli. April 15.—Jimmy (.'offrotli, manager of file Coltna
Athletic club, who yesterday matched Jack Johnson and Stanley Ketchell
for H light on October 12, left this evening for Chicago, when* he will
meet Battling Nelson and Parky McFarland tomorrow to secure their sig
! natures for a 15 round Imut at Colmn on July I.

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