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The White Pine news. [volume] (Ely, Nev.) 1906-1910, June 18, 1910, Image 1

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ASSOCIATED PRESS DISPATCHES AND ALL THE NEWS OF THE WORJLDS GREATEST COPPER CAMP
THE DAILY AND THE WEEKLY NEWS THE BEET NEWSPAPER PUBLICATION IN EASTERN NEVADA, DTDISPENAtBLE IF YOU WOULD KEEP ABREAST WITH WHAT IS GOING ON IN THE WORLD.
- jp. THE DAILY NEWS ENJOYS THE LARGEST CIRCULATION OF ANY PAPER PRINTED IN THE ELY DISTRICT, BOTH AT HOME AND ABROAD. IT ALSO ENJOYS THE LARGEST CONFIDENCE GIVER
A NEWST APRS iN THE DISTRICT, FOR THE REASON THAT IT IS KNOWN TO BE CONSERVATIVE AND CORRECT IN ITS STATEMENTS AND FAD A 1RI INTEREST IN TERRITORY IT OOVRR
-:--— I ---
PS] WHITE PINE NETS
ESTABLISHED IN 1868. EAST ELY, WHITE PINE COUNTY, NEVADA, SATURDAY, JUNE 18, 1910. | VOL. XLI NO. 230.
The Big Gold Camp Guarantees One
Hundred and Twenty Thousand
Dollars and Land Fight in Nevada
SAN FRANCISCO, July 17.—Tex
Rickard announced to the Associated
Press this morning on receipt of a
telegram from Morris Sullivan of
■ Goldfie’d, Nevada, that the Jeffries
Johnson fight would be held there
July 4th. Sullivan guaranteed $120,
000 to the promoters.
"Sullivan is absolutely depend
able,” said Rickard, later in the day.
"I have no details, but I know the
man. You can announce that the
fight will take place in Goldfield un
less a much better offer should come
from some other Nevada city. 1
think it Is hardly possible tnat any
other city will raise the Goldfield
hid."
Militia Ready for Action.
SAN FRANCISCO, July 17.—At a
conference attended by Governor Gil
lett, Adjutant General Lauck, Col.
Pippy of the governor's staff and an
officer of the regular army, plans
were made today to call out the state
militia to stop the Langford-Kauf
man fight tomorrow. The conference
theld in the office of Attorney
ral Webb and although they
d not deny that action had been
l. Promoter Louis Blot, of the
Langford-Kaufman fight, after hear
ing the governor’s decision, declared
he would hold the "contest" as he
had advertised it, and would compel
the troops to stop the fight.
Flglit Talk in Frisco.
SAN FRANCISCO, June 17.—To
all intents and purposes the Jeffries
Johnson championship battle is a
pugilistic contest, a perfectly good
light. The fighters are ready and are
training faithfully; there is no doubt
about the gigantic purse, as nearly
half of the money has been deposited
in the bank; the match has been more
widely advertised and attracted
greater Interest than any contest in
ring history.
That it will not be held in San
Francisco or elsewhere in California
is generally admitted, a conclusion
which sporting circles grudgingly
concur in. Tex Rickard, promoter of
the much-heralded bout, has declared
his intention of suing Governor Gil
lett and Attorney General Webb for
damages which he alleges he sustain
ed because of the intervention of
atate authorities to stop the fight.
While no legal steps have been
taken as yet against any of those con
cerned, Promoter Blot of the Lang
ford-Kaufman fight, slated for today,
is in no better case. He has the pub
lished assurances of the attorney gen
eral that that official will file a peti
tion for injunction against the match
tomorrow. Blot declares that he does
not see how his twenty-round go can
be prevented, and states that he will
hold it on programmed time; but his
tone lacked convictions when he said
it.
As to the big fight, Webb stated to
day that he would not bother with an
application for a temporary restrain
ing order, but would ask for a per
manent injunction. He expects to
have his application on file with the
court within a few days. Rickard does
not intend to contest. He said today
that he would immediately transfer
the match to some other state if the
court ruled against him. He does
not look with favor on the prospect of
a long legal fight to keep It here.
Governor Gillett, whose letter yes
terday to the atorney general created
the greatest stir sportdom has known
m
• RENO REFUSES TO •
• GIVE ANY BONUS •
• - •
• RENO, Nev., July 17.— •
• “Reno stands ready to make •
• good its offer, but the city will •
• not guarantee Rickard any cash •
• bonus to bring his fight here.” •
• This statement from the Busi- •
• ness Men's committee today is •
• accepted as practically positive •
• evidence that no effort will be •
• made by Reno interests to out- •
• bid Goldfield iu its offer of •
• $120,000 for the Jeffries-John- •
• son fight: •
since Jim Corbett defeated John L.
Sullivan, arrived from Sacramento to
day. He was positive in defining his
position. The fight could be stopped
and would be stopepd be declared.
For the opposition his procedure
might arouse he did not care a hoot
apparently. He said as much in al
most as many words.
The governor came to San Francis
co to preside over an exposition mass
meeting. As it has been noised
around that the status of the exposi
tion at Washington had much to do
with his “no fight” order, the sport
ing writers hustled around to hear
anything relative to the battle that
might slip out. They were disap
pointed. Not a word concerning it
was spoken at the meeting.
The only real action of the day in
the big fight mixup was a gloomy one
of the fight fans. Work was stopped
on the construction of the arena.
WILL INVESTIGATE CHARGES.
WASHINGTON, June 17.—A
meeting of the Senate committee on
privileges and elections has been call
ed for tomorrow to consider the
bribery charges in connection with
the election of Senator Lorimer, of
Illinois. It is expected that a reso
lution will be reported providing for
an Investigation.
JURY AGREE
NEW YORK, July 17.—It took a
Brooklyn jury only a few miuntes
this afternoon to find a verdict of
guilty of manslaughter in the second
degree against Richard Sage, a 17
year-old boy, who ran an automo
bile over Mrs. Catharine McCoy, an
aged woman on May 7, at Third
avenue and Pacific street, killing her j
almost instantly. After congratu-1
lating the Jurors for doing their,
share to make the streets safe from !
“such reckless young devils,” Judge 1
Dike said to Sage:
"I predict that by the time you get1
out of state's prison you will know
the difference between a mud-guard
and a carburetter.” He remanded
Sage for sentence Monday. Under
the law the maximum for Sage’s
crime is 10 years at hard labor.
-—. I
BRILLIANT CONTEST HOPED
FOR AT SHEEPSHEAD BAY
— ■
NEW YORK, June 17.—Although the promise of fair weather was
lacking, everything else pointed to a brilliant contest at Sheepshead bay
this afternoon, when the turf classic of the year, the suburban handicap,
Is run over this historic tourae.^ Of the seven high class horses named
to start, not one was regarded out of the running. The withdrawal of
Fltaherbert was one disappointment. James R. Keene's starts, Ballott
and Maskette, it was thought, woulu be the best favored at post time.
Mrs. W. J. Gaynor Poses For
First Snapshot Photograph
Photo by American Press Association.
j Mayor Gaynor of New York is being tloomed by his friends ns a possible
I candidate on the Democratic ticket for president. This suggestion is being
attacked on all sides by W. B. Hearst. While Mayor Gaynor has of course
been silent on the subject, his wife and daughter have been taking an active
part in various social affairs in and around New York. This picture shows,
reading front left to right, Miss Edith Gaynor, Mrs. Gaynor and Miss Pat
Matlldia Page. They were the guests of General Howe at Governors island.
New York. General Howe refused to permit Mrs. Gaynor to be photographed
i until she had given her consent. “I might as well get used to it now," Mrs
j Gaynor said before posing for the photographer.
I _
PASSAGE OK STATEHOOD HILL
«Y SENATE IS REING CKLE
DRATED THROl'GHOI’T THE
TERRITORY.
PHOENIX, Ariz., June 17.—News
of the passage of the statehood bill by
«.-« Senate was received with wild
rejoicing. Phoenix almost took a
half-holiday and forgot everything
else in the general desire to discuss
the brighter prospects opened by the
Senate's action. Men prominent in
public affairs congratulated one an
other on the streets, and there was
general jollification throughout the
capital.
Only two days ago hope of achiev
ing statehood at the present session
of congress had been abandoned;
therefore., the delight occasioned by
today’s news is all the greater. This
feeling extends throughout the ter
ritory, save for a few big mine own
ers and combinations of cattlemen,
who prefer lue present form of gov
ernment.
Private dispatches from Washing
ton received late today conveyed as
surances that the Senate and House
conferees would adjust all differences
on the stateuood bill before adjourn
ment.
DEATH GIVES SLEEP AT LAST.
Former Police Chief Has Been
Awake Twenty Years.
HACKENSACK, N. J., June 16.—
A onzo Wire, the former police chelf,
who asserted that he had not closed
his eyes in sleep for 20 years, died
' last night from an affection of the
j lungs and bronchial tubes. Mr.
| Wire’s strange ailment was believed
I to have been the result of a lightn
ing Btroke which grazed him 30 years
: ago, when he was driving a team of
horses. Soon after he began to de
velop insomnia.
In spite of his inability to sleep
Wire did not seem to be affected, ex
cept that he lost a little weight.
Throughout uis last illness he was
just as wakeful as ever, and it ap
parently did not affect his vitality
seriously.
HIS SKIN TURNED BLUE.
Man Employed in Chemical Works
Has Peculiar Affliction.
NEW YORK, June 16.—A singu
lar case of discoloration of the hu
man body was brought to the Flower
Hospital tonight, when Joseph Pick,
aged 22, was rushed there by an
. ambulance surgeon, who thought him
dying from gas poisoning. Pick s
j face waB a purplish blue—the same
color as Is apparent in extreme cases
| of gas asphyxiation.
| At the hospital the man was strip
ped, and it was iound his whole body
was the same tinge as his face, but
otherwise he had no symptoms of
asphyxiation. His mother. Mrs.
Louisa Pick, said he was employed
in a chemical factory and that he
had been slotfly acquiring the queer
bluish tinge. Gradually the bluish
tinge had become more and more
perceptible and within the last two
or three days it had crept up on his
face.
“It got so bad,” she said, “that I
was ashamed for hint to go out dur
ing the day. This afternoon he beg
ged so I let him go out. .Maybe now
he will get some relief."
i CALLS BRIDGE HOME-BREAKER.

I BATON ROUGE, La., June 16.—
Representative Derouen, in the lower
house of the legislature, has given
notice of a bill for “the absolute sup
pression of the playing of bridge
whist.”
“I am introducing this measure,”
declared Mr. Derouen yesterday, “for
the benefit of children of my state,
who rarely have an opportunity to
know their bridge-playing mothers.
It is also for the benefit of husbands
who hardly have a speaking acquain
tance with their bridge-playing
wives”
INDIANAPOLIS, June 17.—
Charging that the big hats woman
are wearing are keeping men from
churrh services. Rev. Clippinger, a
Methodist minister, has acked the
women of his flock either to leave the
newfangled headgear at home or
reduce the size.
Mr. Clippinger says male members
of his congregation tell him they are
remaining away because they can’t
see over or under or past the hats.
Some have threatened to stay away
until styles change. Mr. Clippinger
argued to the woman that their desire
to keep up with the styles should
not be the cause of keeping away
from services. His announcement
has caused excitement among fe
male chuchworkers and it is said
other ministers here will follow his
lead.
WILL RESEMBLES VERDICT.
Woman Leaven $2.71,000 to Plaintiff
Lover Seeking $100,000.
CHICAGO, June 16.—The sudden
death of Mrs. Fannie S. Steele in a
Chicago hotel Monday, became known
today when Mrs. Steele’s will was
filed In the probate court.
Edgar R. Accotta, of New York,
who, It was reported, sued her for
9100,000 for breach of promise some
time ago, received 925,000 by Mrs.
Steele’s will. The esitmated value
of MrB. Steele’s estate is 2500,000.
Accotta was In Chicago on Monday,
and Is said to have been at Mrs.
Steele's when she died. Death Is re
ported by hotel physician to have
been caused by apoplexy.
• SUSPICIOUS CHARACTER •
• VISITS WHITE HOUSE •
• - •
• WASHINGTON, June 17.—A •
• muscular man six feet in height, •
• with black hair and heavy black •
• mustache, called at the execu- •
• tive offices of the White House •
• today and asked to see the
• President. He was recognized •
• as the same man who visited the •
• executive mansion June 17 of •
• last year, and when arrested at •
• that time had two revolvers in •
• his possession. Taken into cus- •
• today, he was again found to be •
• armed with a pistol. The man •
• gave his name as James Strick- •
• Iy and said he was from Cum- •
• berland, M. D. The man is be- •
• ing held for observation as to •
• his sanity. •
TEN MILLION REDUCTION.
WASHINGTON, June 17.—The
House ways and means committee to
day acted favorably upon the bill
authorizing the issuance of certifi
cates for indebtedness for reclama
tion work, after amending the meas
ure making the amount of certificates
twenty million dollars instead of
thirty millions and limiting the use
of the money to the completion of
existing projects. The approval of
the president to the report of engi
neers is required.
PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL STOCK
HOLDERS OVER SUBSCRIBE
AMOUNT DEMANDED BY CON
GRESS FOR BIG CELEBRATION.
SAN FRANCISCO, June 17.—At a
meeting late today of the stockhold
ers of the Panama Pacific Interna
tional Exposition company the neces
sary sum was pledged to raise the
present subscription of approximate
ly $6,000,000 to the $7,500,000 re
quired to secure national aid for the
fair. If the amount is not subscrib
ed this week the present subscription
will be assessed to make up the bal
ance.
Resolutions adopted informing the
committee on industrial exposition of
the Senate and the committee on for
eign affairs of the House of Repre
sentatives of the pledges and request
ing quick action before the end of the
present session. Resolutions were
then adopted calling upon the munici
pality of San Francisco to amend its
charter to permit a band issue of
$5,000,000 for the benefit of the ex
position. Governor Gillett was the
chief speaker at the mass meeting
and he described the efforts of the
committee, which he led to Washing
ton, to secure congressional aid for
the exposition project.
Telegrams were read from Presi
dent Taft, the California congres
sional delegation and Mayor McCar
thy.
NOISELESS EATER GOES FREE, j
Clears Himself of Charge of Stealing
Nineteen Pies.
WILMINGTON. Del., June 16.—
The fact that he does not make any
nlose when he eats pie this morning
led to Robert Cassidy being dismissed
in the city court after he had faced
a charge of larceny. Some time last
night 19 pies and as many pie plates
were stolen from George H. Huber’s
bakery. Police Sergent Bailey
found 19 pie plates near the Phila
delphia & Reading Railway tracks at
the Madison street crossing, and in
a box-car near by was Cassidy
asleep.
He was arrested and Officer Hen
derson, of the railroad police told
the court he saw a man who looked
like Cassidy near his office last
night and that he was making a noise
like a man eating pies. “I never
make a noise when I eat pies,” pro
tested Cassidy, wheieupon the court
dismissed him.
Civic and Military Socie
ties, States and Cities In
Home Coming Pageant
NKW YORK, June 17.—Col. Theo
dore Roosevelt is today fast nearing
Yew York where a welcoming dem
onstration awaits him tomorrow on
his return from foreign lands. Weath
er conditions for tin' welcoming dem
onstration are dubious today. Milky
fog fairly screened the bay and a re
lentless drizzle made New York a
sodden spot. However, the reception
committee announced today there
will be no postponement of any of
tomorrow's programme on account of
fog, rain or anything else in the
weather line if the steamship Kaiser
in Victoria gets in on time.
When Mr. Roosevelt drives up Fifth
avenue to Fifthy-ninth street to
morrow morning the avenue will be
lined from Eighth street to Fifty
ninth street with 15,000 to 20,000
men and women, members of local
and visiting organizations, that have
agreed to do him honor on his re
turn from Africa.
Many of the organizations will be
in uniform, and nearly all will have
bands. To each organization of more
than 100 persons a whole block has
been assigned. They will carry Roose
velt flags, their society Hags and the
national emblem. The visiting or
ganizations will come (from many
states of the union. Some small
ones have been given positions at the
Mattery. The Spanish War Veterans
will parade in uniform, with several
bands.
The Hamilton Club of Chicago,
under the leadership of John H. Bat
ten, will send 100 members, who will
go down the bay on the steamship
Commodore, and will later have a
stand on Fifth avenue. The Pitts
burg Business Men’s association will
Bend 500 men, marshalled by Colonel
A. P. Moore. Omaha will send a
delegation, and Philadelphia, Cin
cinnati and other cities will also be
represented.
The Verrazano League of Italian
societies will turn out between 6000
and 7000 members, and the Order of
the Sons of Italy, of Paterson, N. J.,
will send 500 more. To these will be
added Italians of Long Island City.
The United Hungarian Societies have
asked for positions for 1500 men. and
the United Swedish societies have
asked for 1000 more.
Governors aiul Mayors Galore.
The Army and Navy Union has ask
ed for a place for between 200 and
300 and the Spanish War Veterans,
who are to march, will turn out 2
000 from New York and others will
come from various cities.
The Austrian societies of New
York will be represented by 150 men,
and the Koosevelt Neighbors' associa
tion, of Oyster Bay, together with a
delegation from the Nassau County
Board of Supervisors will have 600
men in line.
Governors will be given positions
on the stand at the Battery. They
will go down the bay on one of the
cutters to greet the former president
and be the guests of the committee
during the parade. Secretary of
Agriculture Wilson and Secretary of
the Navy Myer have been assigned
positions on the stund and will also
go down the bay and ride with the
committee. Governor Fort, of New
Jersey, and Governor Quinby, of New
Hampshire, will be present. Mlrabeau
L. Towns and Civil Service Commis
(Continued on page two)
DEMOCRATIC REFORM RULE
IS ADOPTED OY COMMITTEE
WA8HINGTTON, June 17.—The decision of the House of Represen
tatives on tlie rules committee today to report the “reform” rule designed
to prevent legislation being “smothered” in committees, makes another
tight on rules in the House in this session improbable. The rule is prac
tically that prepared by the Democratic conference known as Clark-Sherley
resolution. The House committee on labor today decided to favorbly re
port the bill creating a department of labor with seat in President's cab
inet. ^

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