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The weekly union record. [volume] (Oroville, Calif.) 1864-1866, October 29, 1864, Image 2

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OROVILLE, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 29.
National Union Nominations.
FOa PRESIDENT,
ABRAHAM LINCOLN,
OF ILLINOIS.
FOR VICE PRESIDENT,
ANDREW JOHNSON,
OF TENNESSEE.
Presidential Electors.
J. G. McCALLCM.of £1 Dorado.
S. BRA WAX, of Sun Francisco.
C. MAC LA V. of Santa Clara.
IV. IV. CHASE, of Alameda.
IV. OLIVER, of Siskiyou.
For Congress — ‘l'iird ,
GEN. JOHN BIDWELL,
For Supervisor. First District — T. FOGG.
Foi County Sui rti.or— IV. KDMCXDS.
For Coroner G. IV. PRJXTV.
Our Ticket.
We take pleasure in calling the attention of
the voters ol Butte county to our Ticket.
Gen. John Bidweli, oar candidate for Con
gress, is emphatically a man ol the people.
Thrown upon his own resources in early life,
he crossed the continent among the earliest
adventurers and settled in the dacramcnto
Valley. As the reward of his adventurous
and enterprising spirit, he is now the owner of
a fine tract of land, which, by an untiring in
dnstrv, he has brought to that degree of cul
tivation, in which usefulness and ornament
combine to render the attractions of home
pleasant to himself arid agreeable to those w ho
partake of his generous hospitality. He is
indeed, one of nature's noblemen, truthful,
honest, and unassuming. As a neighbor, kind
and generous; as a citizen, enterprising and
benevolent; as a politician, a patriot rather
than a parlizan, with talents more remarka
ble for sound judgment than for dazzling bril
liancy; with a modest, yet dignified demeanor.
He is well qualified to represent his constitu
cuts in the councils of the nation.
George W. Fiinly, candidate for Coroner,
is well and favorably known ns a former rep
vesentative from this county in the legislature.
Uis record before the people is one that does
him honor.
For Surveyor, William Edmunds—has had
many years of experience in the Government
service, and in his profession, enjoys the confi
dencc of those who liavc bad the benefit of his
services.
For Supervisor of first District, our towns
man, Mr. Fogg, is thoroughly identified with
the interests of the county, as a property
holder, and as a business man possesses those
qualifications which w ill enable bim to guard
and protect the finances of our county.
We con say of them all, they are true to the
Union, and worthy the support of all Union
men.
A Word to Union Voters.
UKMKMBKR, that on the Sih day of No
vember, you arc called upon to deposit your
ballots for Liberty and Union. The result of
this election will decide the destiny of this
nation. The Klcction of .McClellan will de
cide for an armistice with the vain hope of a
pretended compromise in lavor of the Union,
while, in reality, it will give new life and vigor
to the rebellion, and end with a final dissolu
tion of the Republic, and a return to despot
ism.
On the other hand, the election of Lincoln
and Johnson will bo the decision of the ['topic
for a prosecution of the war, until the hydra
headed monster of rebellion shall have been
crushed, and peace and order once more res
tored beneath the old Flag throughout the
Union. Ta-t not the enemy deceive you by
falsehood and hypocrisy. Let every Union
man go to the polls and vote the entire Union
Ticket.
The Last Grand Rally of the Campaign.
Geo. John Bidwcll and lion. A. A Sar
gent will address the citizens of Unite county,
at Oroville, on Friday evening, November
FOURTH. Filensivc preparations have
been made to give them a brilliant reception,
as will bo seen by reference to the programme
in another column. As this will he the last
demonstration of the campaign, so let it be
the grandest. fail the people turn out en
masse, and show to our brelhern of the mono
tains and valleys, that old Rutte is proudly
and firmly marching with loyal hearts and
cheerful step to the music of the Union.
Mkan.—"Slander ranch, that something
may stick." appears to be the policy pursued
by the U-opperbead Have worshippers against
Gen. John Bidwcll. The abuse, ns appeared
ihrough the columns of the California (express
is from the pens of anonymous scribblers,
who would blush with shame should their
names be made public- An exception, how
;vcr, is one Mr kusel of Chico, who can boast
'fan idea no higher than a Rigger Indian—
»nd was arrested and fined for selling whisky
■ o Riggers. Upon it being known that he
was one of the public slanderers of Gen. Kid -
veil, bis neighbors, to give vent to their feel
ngs of alter contempt for the man and his ua
vriucipled conduct, assembled and burned him
a effigy in front of his rum mill.
The reports circulated privately are Iron)
rile Copperheads, ard are groundless—made
K'k-ly on partuunism.
e have no better or more capable man in
.he Ristriet than Geo. Bidwell to represent us
o the halls of Congress—no one who has been
to long identified with and knows so well the
wants of the people of Northern California.
He is no political wire-puller—he is an honest,
alaiu and intelligent farmer. The large num
ber of day laborers who have been and are
now in his employ sneak in the highest terms
*f his liberality and generosity. They will ail
vote for him wherever they may be scattered
through the First Ristriet.
A Chance. —A loyal Irishman in San
Francisco has deposited in the Alta office the
lum of two hundred and fifty dollars, from his
swn bard earnings, which any Copperhead is
Invited to cover on the result of the Presidential
sleet ion
Tie principles cf seif government, for which
oar fitters endured the horrors of a seven-years
war, have been discarded by a portion of the
American people, and a rival government set
np based upon a despotic principle, which
denies the right of the majority to rale. The
political distinctions which have heretofore
characterized parties have been swallowed up
in the great question, paramount to all others
••abail the American people surrender tie
right of seif government to the dictation o' a
military despotism?’’ Such a despotism the
leaders of rebellion have set np. and are
attempting to establish on a permanent has;?.
They are assisted in tide onhoiy work by a
large band of conspirators in the free .'■ta'es,
who, under the disguise of loyalty to the Union,
are eternally prating about •• Peace’’ and
“Compromise". Many well meaning citizens
arc deceived by their sophistry, and join their
ranks in opposition to the measures of the
government, which are being enforced for the
preservation of oar national existence'.
The unconditionally loyal men of all former
parties have laid aside all minor questions, and
united in one great Union party for the defence
and perpetuation of the Union, the Government,
and the freedom and liberty of mankind. They
have determined that this Republic shall stand,
a proud monument of man’s capacity and right
to enjoy the principles of seif government. The
executive authority has presented every oppor
tun.ity that can be offered consistently with the
dignity and forbearance ol a jn-t and generous
nation, for the return of a disaffected people to
their allegiance, and the enjoyment of peace
under the protection of the Constitution ; bat
every opp rluoity has been disregarded, the
Union, the Constitution and the laws Lave
been spurned w ith contempt, and the autbori’y
and power of the Government have been defied.
Under this condition of things, who can dis
cover any other proper course fur the nation to
pursue than the vigorous prosecution of the
war to restore peace by their subjugation?
On the IGth of last month, the Richmond
Enquirer, discussing the question ol I’eace.
says : “This Confederacy or I he Yankee nation,
one or the other goes down, down to perdition
That is to say, one or the other must forfeit its
national existence and lie at the mercy of its
mortal enemy. We all know by this time the
(ale in store for us if wc succumb. The other
party has no smaller slake. As surely as we
completely rub their armies —ami without that
is no peace or truce at a!!—so surelv will wc
make them pay our war debt, though we wring
it out ol their hearts. And they know it well,
and therefore they cannot make peace except
through their utter exhaustion and absolute
inability to strike another blow." The Enqui
rer speaks by authority the sentiments of the
rebel Confederacy—one government or the
other must go down—forfeit its existence—be
forever destroyed. Which shall it be?
The rebels ure fighting to destroy the Gov
ernment and Union handed dowu to us by our
fathers. The Government, supported by the
Uuion parly, is fighting for the suppression of
the rebellion. What is that lactii u doing
which styles itself the Democratic party ? Fur
whom are they fighting ? For which belligerent
arc they bound by secret oath to light, and for
the destruction of which government arc they
secretly armed ? They that are nut for us arc
against us. That they arc not w ith the Uuion
party is the strongest proof that they arc
against it, and against the government which
looks in vain for any olhet support than that
which it receives from the Union party.
That a large portion of the leaders of the
Democratic party are traitor?, who have stolen
the livery of the Union to serve the rebellion
in, is beyond all question. There is another
portion who do not really desire the destruction
of our national fabric, but whose braius arc so
crazed, whose minds are so incapable of realiz
ing an emotion above those of a brute, and
whose perceptions of right and wrong are
simply those and those only which have their
foundation in a selfish, ignorant or ungodly
prejudice, that they would rather sec this
nation and all its past, present and future
greatness sink into oblivious nonentity, rather
thau see it borne out safely from this struggle
by any other authority thau that of the Demo
cratic parly. The-only argument that is likely
to have any effect on either of these two classes
is an application of physical force that will
affect cither their parse or their poison. If
there arc honest, well meaning men in their
ranks, who are deceived by their falsehoods
and hypocrisy, to them we address this epistle.
You find iu your platform a declaration in
favor of peace and union; your nominee declares
for war and union. The leaders of your party
are divided on peace and war policy—one por
tion would have pence and disunion by acknowl
edging the independence of the Southern Con
federacy; the other would have peace and
union if they could have it by authority of ihe
name of the Democratic parly, otherwise they
would let ihe (ale of Rome ho the fate of this
Republic—divide her people into factions until
she falls an easy prey to the enemies of self
government. The whole tenor, scope and
directi in of the dt durations from rebel author
ity, from flic first act of secession to the present
moment, have assured us that they have struck
for disunion and independence, and unless wc
g-unl them that, and pay their war debt, there
can be no peace until we conquer and subjuga’c
them. Are you ready to yield to disunion ?
Are you willing to swell the rank? f factious
citizen? until the nation is prostrated bv internal
dissensions and falls by the perfidy of her own
people, to rise no more iu the grandeur of her
past glory—her freedom lost, her people dis
franchised and enslaved, or exiled to lore ga
lauds?
"If God in his wisdom has doomed this
nation to destruction —it her mission is fa.tided,
and her dory is to pass away, let the groans
of her dissolution resemble the agony of her
birth, and as she was born, so let her expire,
amid the shock of contending armies, ihe
thunder of cannon, the screams of the wounded
and the groans of the dying.” Rut methiiiks
I hear you say. “1 would not have her die. for
with her dies the very name of freedom. I
would not have her perish, for with her perishes
humanity’s las! hope, and mi..ions of anguished
hearts crushed beneath the iron heel of a cruel
and relentless despotism, sink in thedaikgnlf
of slavery forever.” Awake, then, from the
stupor which has benumbed your faculties, and
bewildered your senses, by listening to Ihe
hypocritical (cachings of factious traitors, under
the false name of Democracy! Fly to the
rescue of your country in the hour of her peril,
and leave to your children ibe proud legacy of
honor, that will descend like the mantle’ ol
h pah upon tb<ir shoulders, when you shall
have passed from the laud of the free to the
home of (be blessed.
Tbe demonstration on Thursday evening was
grand beyond expectation. The unfavorable
■ f the weather in the ■
de’erred many livirgat a distance from comi-g
who otherwise would have been present. Yet
the alter dance was large—equal to that of the
forcer demonstration in numbers and enthusi
asm. Between four and Eve hundred men
were in procession a; many more lined tbe
streets, j br-icg in the cheers and sh uts that
arose to tbe ear like tbe sound of many wa'ers.
The fair ladies of Ororiile and the cocntry
around were present with their smiics and con
gratulations and patriotic sonos. adding j y
and cheerfulness to the occasion.
THE PEOOESSIOX
Farmed at the Armory, at 6b. o'c.ck. Just
at this time, the Hamilton deiegati B of ■
wagons and a number on horseback, escorted
by the Card, arrived and fell into lice, amid
cheers, huzzas and the firing of cannon. In
the front wagon there rode in triumph on the
-tnrmv sea the old ship Constitution—a little
three masted bark got up for the occasion by
Capt. Dick Prentice, of Hamilton, manned by
five sailir boys in while, and illuminated with
some 40 glebe lanterns suspended from her
rigging. Tbe precession marched through tbe
principal streets in the following order: Ist.
the Band; 2d, Orovble Boards: 3d. citizens
with transparencies and torches; 4th. delega
tions from Cherokee Flat, .Morris Ravine,
Thompson's Flat, Hamilton. After passing
through the principal streets saluting prominent
places of business and residences of prominent
citizens with cheers and huzzas for every ntani
testation of loyally and patriotism, the assent
blage gathered around the speaker s stand, in
front of the St. Nicholas Hotel, to listen to
the speakers of the occasion.
THE ILUMINATIOX
Was grand and beautiful. On M nigomory
street, one continual glare of light changed the
darkness of night to the brightness of day.
Business places on other streets showed enua
evidences of enthusiasm, and nearly every pri
vate residence was decorated w ith illumination? -
that lit up the scene with beauty and grandeur,
and added cheerfulness and admiration to the
hearts of the already enthusiastic multitude.
The assemblage was called to order by J ujge
Cooghey, and, the Hon. F, M. Smith being
called to the chair, in brief at.d eloquent lan
guage thanked his fellow citizens for the honor
o! presiding over their meeting on an occasion
manifesting so much patriotism.
THE SPEAKING
Was such as the popularity of the speakers
had led us to expect. The first speaker, Hon
J. F. S wift, was (as he said) disappointed, dis
satisfied, chagrined, because the people of
Butte had made such a demonstration that the
Democracy had been shamed away, and he
would have to make an entirely different speech
from what he intended, he having been prepared
to skin the Democracy, while Kdgerton would
apply the salt. Ho gave a very cheering
prospect of the cause o( the Union in the Sta'c.
interspersed with numerous anecdotes and
scathing rebukes, which were skinning to the
Democracy and their nominee.
Mr. Kdgerton, on takiig the stand, made a
Hr iff allusion to our Colonial existence—our
independence and prosperity—and the rebellion.
He alluded to tbe position of the Democracy
of California in Ibul. showing that those who
were for war then, and peace now, are unworthy
the confidence of the pedfilu; that they were
aiding the plot of Confederate scripholders to
make the United States pay the Confederate
war debt; discriminated between Democrats—
scccsh traitors were bad enough, but Northern
copperheads deserved to be rammed, jammed
and damned, forced into the big gun of the
Comanche and fired into hell's back kitchen :
showed the fallacy of .State sovereignty as
claimed by the Democracy; evaporated the
charge of arbitrary arrests; unmasked the
proposition fora Convention of states, showing
the rebels we're whipped, and wanted more time
to recruit : that Knglish and American confed
erate scripholders were in league with tbe
rebels and copperheads in the peace compromise
convention cry ; that they would cry in vain ;
that the masses of the South w ould be w elcomed
back whenever they would lay down their arms,
but the leaders should be hung. His speech was
a telling one. powerful and eloquent, and wit)
long be remembered by thi se who heard it.
The speeches were interspersed with music
by the Baud and songs from the Bloc Ciub, the
closing scenes being enlivened with the “Red,
White and I’due," and numerous cheers. After
which, the speakers took their leave, and the
assembly dispersed, their countenances radiant
wilt joyous emotion, and their hearts buoyant
with hope.
Humanity at a Discount.
Or.c of the most remarkable features of this
rebellion is the savage ferocity am] barbarous
inhumanity of those concerned in it. Wc
never hud nny admiration for the political
course cf the Hon. Charles Sumner, but we
must confess the incidents of this war have
convinced us. and confirmed us in the conviction,
that his great speech on the Barbarism if
Slavery was not an overdrawn, but a truthful
picture of the influences of that institution over
the people where it held sway. As an illustra
tion of this truth, the Fort I'iilow massacre,
and numerous other instances, one of which
follows, are evidences direct and to the point.
A St Louis paper states that a band of Price’s
guerrillas attacked a party of V. S. troops
under Major Johnson. The Major was com
pleU-ly overwhelmed, and himself and command
subjected to the most shocking barbarity that
ever blackened the page cf hislorv. Major
Johnson was murdered and sea’i-ed. One
hundred aud thirty of his men shared his fate:
most of them weie shot through the head, then
scalped, the wretches tearing off the scalps
with ibeir bayonets, and thrusting them, reek
ing into the mouths of the dying. The fellows
who committed these acts will, if they have
the opportunity, vote for McClellan.
The Cleveland Herald neatly savs that,
seeing the velocity with which the Chicago
Copperhead train is rushing to sure destruction.
McClellan, the cautious railroad man. keeps
his eye on the warn;; g —•• Don’t stand on the
platform 1"
I’E.vDLiTO.'- has not yet accepted the Chicago
nomination for Vice I’resident, and. owing to
the prospect of an overwhelming defeat, prob
ably never wJU
Mart «sh _ r-ssr : 2 2d,
■£ i sof SbeMan’i las; vi -lory in the
Shenandoah v. >y, out! ‘nr ’ ■« JaX-O killed,
wonndc-d and m:s- '<7. We 1s: in the nomine
24 gun.-, and captured in the fzht 1,000 men
and :-0 guns. The rebel loss was a bent 10 OX.
C’aUar’a division captured, within two weeks,
.’I goes and 5 bank Sag-, besides a la'ce
cumber of ambc!arces. torses and males. It
s said that I gstreel was not in ti
bat Karly Lad strock desperately to recover
■1 - ' . s reputation. Dei -
.‘ ' X th New Tork pars the r -
to Fisher's Hi ', captaring 14 cans, wagon
trai .?. and slaughtering an immense comber
of the enemy.
Additional details are given, showing the
■ fSI 1 - ist victory
Sbeoaodoa valley. .. r prisoners
dly stated at 3 S ndau’a an
is being prepared f.: f irthcr movements.
Later advices from Missouri confirm the
defeat of Price, (lev. Hall thicks oar cavairv
are damaging Price's movement through Kan
sas. and are sprinkling the road with the Mood
of his best ciea. The Union loss io the late
battle was two hundred and £fty L ied and
wounded. The rebel loss was much greater.
We took between four at. I Sve hundred pris
oners. Many d sorters from Price’s army
were c icing in. The Union forces j n Arkaa
sas were preparing to intere pt Price.
Pbe New 1 rk s specia
patch says it is stated that Grant will insist
that- ihc civilians row at he front encaged in
the distribution of tickets t,, ? litiers for the
coming election .-had either leave the armv
altogether or make sr me arrangement bv which
tlicir mission can be performed without imped
ing military operations. Their political dis
cussions excite the s I iiers in some cases ami
lead them to neglect their duties.
A large number of French officers have
arrived at New \ ork from Mexico. It is
stated that ten thousand Frc!.--:, troops are to
be withdrawn from Mexico at an early day.
■». i ""niraxsai
J doe Tvlkk.—This gentleman, who hail
from Stockton, addressed - meeting at this
place, on Monday eve; i:.g. There having been
no very general am, itncenic; t prev ; usly made,
there were few in attendance except citizens of
our town ; but the speaker entertained those
who were present for about two hours, and, if
anything, there were more people present ai
the close than the beginning i f i.:= sjecch.
Mr. Tyler is certainly one of the tnu.-t effective
speakers io the Sta'e. 11 is sjuecb embraced
many very good poinis, which were illustrated
by a rich luod of anecdotes. Much of the
argument was addressed to foreigners, and he
proved incontestably that Modern I*emocracy
is in alliance with the Southern conspirators
ooe ol the cardinal doctrines of whose creed is
that all government originates in usurpation
and is maintained by force : who claim that
they arc u "superior race,” and contemptuously
term all foreigners "paupers," etc. lie reminded
foreigners that they arc excluded from voting
by the "Cor.liderate Constitution"—and yet,
notwithstanding the rebels degrade the for
eigner beneath the negro, there arc many of
them, especially I. ishnien, who manifest a sym
pathy with the rebel cause! The speaker pro
duced documents to show that the i-ini! ' ale
cause of the rebellion was i. I slavery, but the
determination of the S utherii aristocrat? to
ftec themselves from the * rule ol the majority.”
P>y the adoption of the caucus system and the
“two-thirds ruie” in n urinating candidates for
the Preside ; the South contr ed the Dem
ocratic party and the country Ur thirty years,
and actually secured a plank in 11,; Cincinnati
platform endorsing secession J, ctrinc! It was
this that gave them the delusive idea that the
North wonl ■ “It ; th m go io p. neehut only
the few doughface leaders of the party slunk
■away to their holes when Ihc secession viper
rui-ed its head, and laid there until a President
was to be elected, when they came crawling
forth, hissing and spitting their venom at decent
men. and calling upon the people to elect a man
who would carry out the aforesaid resolution io
the Cincinnati platform and "let the South go
in peace.” Hut we cannot follow the speaker
in detail ; suffice it to say, he gave Copperheads
a dose which will lay heavy ou their callous
stomachs until election day, and reassured
Union men in the strength of their cause. The
meeting closed with rousing cheers lor "Abe
and Andy," Grant, Sherman and .Sheridan.
M> CI.EU.AXS A lICITRABY Akrlsts.—The
Copperheads of Connecticut are principally
busy explaining away McClellan's arbitrary
arrest of the Maryland legislature. The latest
excuse for him is that he was young at the
time. Said Professor Fowler, at the Middle
town clambake. "He was a young man, and
wasn't accustomed to the ways of doing busi
ness at Washington." This is a new version of
the sad "Roma: cc of the Poor Voting Man."
Professor Fowler said that McClellan ix’cevd
iugly “regrets" this youthful indiscretion. In
consideration of his youth and inexperience,
the people will permit George H. to tarry in
Jericho till bis beard is grown.
Gr.NKn.ii.s and Peii.tTios.—Since General
McDowell has made a speech or two on politi
al matt the Copi rhead press [says the
Bee) arc struck with horror at the idea of a
military officer having anything to do with
politics. In their eyes, such a course is out
rageous. They conveniently forget that their
candidate for President is a Major-General in
the army, and that he once wrote an election
eering idler to a-s st the eiecli >n of Judge
Woodward in Pennsylvania. Probably it is
right and proper fur thvir Major-General to
meddle with politics, because be is not military
officer enough to omour.t to much.
Nov hi, Wager.—The following bet was
made at Vreka, (he other day : If Siskiyou
county goes for McClellan, C. 11. Pyle is to
saw half a cord of black oak wood in front of
the court house, with a ball and chain to bis
leg—the usual .price to be paid lor the sawing,
and the money to go to the Sanitary Fund.
It the county goes for Lincoln. K. A. Schmatka
is to comply with the conditions of the bet in
place of Pyle—that is. saws the wood and pays
the price of sawing into the Sanitary i and !
"Cease hostilities and w ithdraw the armies.”
said the McClellan Convention. Move on
Karly at once, aud crush him,” said Grant to
Sheridan ; and he did it. Which is the short
.A road —• an enduring pace 7
orats. —Three rebels cf different degrees hap- 1
peaed ~tc-!y To be together "I to” said ore. ’
•: r McCMa- ca bis letter of acceptance."!
•i s;j port him said the sc roc-’, ‘on ’.be doc- >
*r ' >' rf the platform of the Chica;'' Cottveu
add I the tl -
...... , . |UJ - V
t r. -recess as securtcc the
of the S Ah these met
assume the honored name of Democrats
One ... _. .
Evidently, a man who should attempt to
support the Chirac ■ plat form and nominee at
the same time would meet a similar fate to the
man who I red to travel two roads at once, and
nnf'r'nnately—sr’lt himse’l!
T :: . :. a >:<•; It.— 1 it
Gord -c, of A mad'-. recently addressed a Dem
cra’lc Club ir> Jacks n. and said that, unless
Lincoln is rlrctcd President by a majority of
votes oatstde of \\esterr Virjii ia. Loots . -.
etc., the Democracy wIII rebel. If the Copper
head- do not rebel only iu such an event, they
wii! remain qhiesceat for many years to come.
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
Grand
UNION RALLY!!
rally Round ilie Figg IVys.
Hally once again.
GEN. JOHN BID WELL,
A N D—
HON. A. A. SARGENT,
Wb; address tl»e ciii/.cns of Bntte County.
AT OKOVILLE,
Friday, Nov. 4th, 1864.
SPEAKING Ay LI. COMMENCE AT 7 I*. M
Thi'ii will be held iu lhr afternoon • f the
Fourth
A SANITARY FAIR!!
Tin* Military of Maryiivillr, Cliir*, Orovlib
Bangor. ami Butte Mountain Knngri*.
Will be present on the occasion.
Torch-Light Procession
Ai.d Grand Di-play of Fire-works,
in the evening.
SANITARY BALL
Wb! be given ;it night in Arnvuv Hall. A spr
id invention i- extended the ladies. Turn "lit.
Uunm Men, to the ia.-f Grand Hally of the Cam
paign.
VINEYARD & STEELY.
Brass and String Band.
_ A MUSIC FURNISHED AT SHOUT
£ • • . • Cot Parlies,
V V . at n-u-< ’.«• rate-. A
/ kinds of n: -i i iu-tm meats fur
nished. Address. J. 11. YIN EVA RD.
November ‘2S, ”m-.V2 Oregon City.
\V K ST'S
Feather River Ferry!
EAII OROVILI.F. AT THE FOOT OF MONT
- x gmuery Street, is in thorough repair, and the
traveling public will find it to their advantage to
cross at this point. The roads leading t<* and from
it are in line ■•ondi;i.«n. and persons appro odiing
o vile from the w< -t will find it :» saving in ins
tall e t.» eioss at this ferry. M- l>. WEST.
O t -her !*sih, Isr. j. * lyjl
Opposition Steamer Day
jv o i /; mnj : n i j .
<efTf*TP-i Oj*pn-i?i n t> New Yoik vi.i N; .nagna.
trying tin United Slates Mai;.
Orial Kt-tlut tion In Ratra.
000 Miles less Ocean Travel in the Tropics than by
Panama.
ao i:\in o\ Tin* ipuTi; aftkr No
vember Ist.
rjIHE CENTRAL AMERICAN TRANSIT COM
B pany will dispatch the favorite steamship
America,
WM.L. MERRY. Commander.
F**r San Juan del Sur. NICARAGUA. From Mi--
skm street Wharf,
ON MONDAY. NOV. 1 lib. ]<•;{.
Connecting at Grey town with the new and nil
steamship
Golden Rule,
:».."»otl Tons Burthen. FOR NEW V()RK.
- ‘ t
Meals furni-iud tree by the Company while cro-*
tug. A Baggage Mu>tcr will lie sent thr-.agh by
••ar;i Steamer. Insurance on the lowest
rales.
For further information npplv t *
1. W. RAYMOND. Agent.
N. V». corner ol Battery an I Fine Streets,
un stair.-. San Francisco.
lUKKVII FOR
CHEAP JOHN!
NEW GOODS!
NEW PRICES!!
I WILL FELL ALL GOODS ON AND AFTER
the 15tu day of October IMI4,
From 10 to 20 Per Cent
CHEAPER
in ax a vr o'////;/; house l\ rorrx '
I have g"t a Omni Assort meut of
Clothing,
Boots, Shoes,
Hats, Caps,
AND ALSO. A GOOD ARTICLE OF TOBACCO.
WUkli I will sell 20 per cent, cheaper
Than any Other House
IN BUTTE COUNTY I
Call and Srr For \ ourself.
AT (HEAP JOHN'S STORE,
Montgomery Street.
Next Door lo Perkins*.
N. DZEIIGOWSKY.
UioviilCjUtl. 13th 800
tat if tt-an has the following on this subject :
ibe richest j .-;c ef the campaign is Grarrv
Wa t s lea-ed opir r that perse; ? who six
■ Btte ijro W tb< States to , hm to Ottg
a? where he i?, We befieee Welt ha? a child:
■ ge does Mar
f:. ::i dav : h:? birth, or c:: e months prior
to that T:me ?
Probate Notice.
INi'a1 N
i'a jruia. la the matter of Lie Estate of Ja
cob Bakthol- y. .Uv.'riSnJ.
On reading and t.:r.g the ; : F v. iy Bur


-
’ -' '
'
-
s
; >a;o do v.i>- iT. , *!.
t*ar U-:--;e the iV.M o« tne C-unty
Uutte.at the Court romt of .said On t. i
th
'
BMm nid dtf.tim lad thtre to show gim
*hr .-..i v-r-K . ft O’.'t- .•. >h<-..1d t made of
- . '
s . . ~ Bartl ’ g ■
It is ■ of this ord
- - ■ ■ - ■ -
it Dxios
shed i
<»rv\il:v. i tv ••: Butte ...
'V. S. SAFFORD
Prolute Judge Butte Count v.
. mu \m
N
i lrrk «•: Butte County JK\ <-flu*io Clerk of the
I’roJute Court, d<- hereby certify the foreg i;isr to
be a true oo} y of the order made and entered > i.
the ro.iiiwto >a..l C -.at.
IS
- - .
( - - ) 1- l. J. G. MOO UK, Clerk.
Jv*‘s C.keen. Depute.
J. M. BURT,
■tw d 2 A Harney fur IVtiiii aer.
Watches,
CLOCKS, & JEWELRY!
AT ((IST FOR TlllllTt OVA'.
BY GEO. E. SMITH.
(.'.ill in and Examine the Go nls n :-l
Prices, and Judge for yourselves.
-J
r l1•' Al l WHOM IT MAY CONCERN. <
K
to sell, AN!* VVII SK! 1 :i:,\ porti .
ray stork of
WATCHES, CLOCKS, JEWELRY AND
Fancy Goods,
AT NEW VOBK WHO! ESAI.E PI
Pp-viding always that I can find buyers. ,i:. i pro
viding further .‘and this document i"- i—ned with
fi»c express understanding that a!! Goods - >l,l at
this time and at those pi ices, are to be paid far
IV C ASH OV DKLIVF.R\ !
Without any equivocation nr mental reservation
whatever.
It ant if 111 Silver II ntitin<p\Vn(riics,
from $l4 to
(.old lit If ItticUlcM,
from $. to $l2.
(•rrmnn Mlvrr-Plale«l Teaspoons,
?1 AO t" $2 per half dozen.
table Spoons ami Forks. Plated with Purr
SlbVF.lt,
from f to $4 per half dozen.
Solid (.old (nliforiiin .Made and
Other Jewelry.
AT TUB SAME RATES.
Call scon or yon miss the chance of getting these
Goods at Mi. h prices.
NOW IS YOUR TIME TO 15L V
WATCHES,
Clock?, Jewelry, and Fancy Goods,
At \e*« \oilv U hoi« tak Prices,
FOR THIRTY I»AYS.
All kinds of work in my line done as usual, at tin
LOWEST POSSIBLE JUTES.
GEO. E. SMITH.
Orovilie, Oct. 22, I SGI. . n M
Great
CHANGE in BUSINESS
NEW GOODS !
AT AUCTION PRICES.
WILL SELL HEREAFTER. GOODS OF ALL
sort', at Auction Price-. A lull assortment of
the following goods will be constantly kept on
hand:
FA M V A\U STAPLE
DRY GOODS!!
Clothing,
Boots & Shoes,
Hats, Caps,
Carpets,
Oil Cloths, etc.
lVr-‘ j- a i-hing to purchase, will save ten per
■ tut. * a a.. Mup'e Articles. The will
Be Strictly Adhered To.
By this means we can give
GItEATISA R G A 1 \ S .
I>. N. FBfESLEBEX.
Orovilie, Oct. Ist, ISG4. c4S
PUBLIC SPEAKING !
CHANGE OF PROGRAMME.
I nion Mm, Particular Attention!
HON- A. A. SARGENT AND GEN. JOHN
Bidwell, Union nominee f> r Congress from
the Third P.strict, will speak at the foi. wmg ]»!a
ces : Particular attention i« called tether :tj>-
poiiitroents. a> they vary in some part lar- from
announcements heretofore made, and it is impor
tant that all mistakes be avoided :
Yreka .. Monday, Oct. 24th
S oil's Barr Tuesday. Oct. 2Ath
Fort Jones W ednesday, Oct. 2*llh
Callahan's Ranch Thursday, Oct. 27th
Trinity Center Friday, Oct. 2Mh
Weavervilic Saturday. Oct. 2 *tli
Shasta .... Monday, Oct. Jlst
Millville Tuesday. Nov. Ist
r. Si
Tehama .Tbur>day, Nov. ltd
Orovilie Friday, Nov. 4th
Marysville Saturday. Not. oth
MR. GEORGE W. TYLER will not attend at
these appointments.
A. J. BRYANT.
Chairman U. B. C. Cemuiittec.
LJii;. u lj SL'y&liv . bc.relary
VHiSWU.K.
JOHN CHITTLE.
Wholesale and Retail
DRUGGIST
M r STREET
MVIiVvVII.U', \KVU KIR-T.
(Formerly Rice Cofls;i A (Y)
C« N '
fav w « . f t; , . that he ;•* now fudv
prvptivd for the Wb ae.i detail Drag bt>i
‘ * -
a:.,; that he !. ;<• ; jet.era’, red;; :■ -•> , n :.r.ee
• '
f v.-' Uhuuj
' •'
, ‘ ’ *rv .anleu t. examine
;’ ' : •k. :?'; i A-v ; that %
can Bml therein ererr thin? pertaining to a
First-Class Drug House,
A:. ': at r- v I; ,ii give The
closest . ver.
I. EM RAJ At.KMV FOR
Ayers’ Jaynes’
A:. ’, other Patent Modi ine*.
VA-'N A POM ARI^
Antimalaria.
The Oc’ivUrated
Magnetic Oil.
I! O HI. IT/,E I. I. .< TI I. 1.! y(J I \
Chilian Ague Pills,
From the original rsve;.
also ran
cAUV U. 11.1 s SPKi IFH i IM| \
(The great rectedy for 0 *r rrhvra.)
Chinese Detergent,
And other Po* :.ir Patent M«sh. iw.
Q - r*in- Stone.C
- I
ao de-'»ri|»ti ';i>. Paw t> \ r.
i'ht >. \\ h:te l.ea.i a.; pv’- , ; j
Oil. P.r >he< of L! do
Fresh California Hops,
In one and -."..e h.;lf j nth.: 1*1:4
j ..
Fancy Goods,
Perturaerie'. A«• .
AT UNPRECEDENTED LOW PRICES
N- n ' 1 :t \| T: 1 ! : ■ 11, K. ;..lt trir ||
JOHN I'M ITTI.I
1 1
♦ni-.‘»4 Meat eorun ■ r Pir>t.
C. GAPPELMANN & CO.,
(> ■ < c>sors to P Sjucvkf AC. . )
waoi.i;>vi.k pfim-n imported wo
DOMESTIC
WINES, BRANDIES,
Cordials, Syrups,
AM* '.\N IK \ NOCU
Premium Lager Beer !
WISH T-> ( M.I.THE \TTF.N >N >*■’
W w l‘< r- f ■ U -e tha*
we ran giro fin* ntost ■ nmpiefe .'atinfant*»n l-»
ih *-e \rh<» may t.iv>r n- with :l*ir pnf rormge
Having rem % : ■ s j.«-h pa md adM
largely t > o r :.rmr; v >k. jidd« r- < a * in- -i.il**d
with anv kn avn Lr> i in thr market. We are al
so Agents fur Hit hoi brands of
i \ i.noii m \
WINES and LIQUORS,
AXD nr.ALEKS IX
Fresh Oregon Cider,
Ma;iid.iuiiir»‘U I. ■ m i ■;-e A j»| • >.•» ai r warranted
genuine.
We retunu* r thank-* for the h oral • -atronag**
hrre tot-»rc htM-uvrd up uus and hope ti a *u
t tunanee ot the s-anu .
» . UAI’PEI.M W*N a i »
11l and 11 > s»* .nil srren
hr-I wren I> and Maiden I aim
f. CAPPELM.WX. I’. SPRKCKEI.>. 11. I AM .
Merchants’ Saloon,
CORNER OF MAIDEN I.\M: A THIRD ST".
Opp -:tc City Maikrt.
St, Nicholas Exchange,
ADJUINI.Ni. si- XU liOLA< HOTEL.
D Strert.
’‘i \u * *-• \ ir.i.K.
D, McCARTY, Propneto. .
KEEPS COHSI ixn.v OX HAND THE CHOI
CEST BIIAXHS <IK
LIQUORS & CIGARS!
ST. NICHOLAS HOTEL,
I I.LK.
■ ■ -
renovated and re? rbr»‘uchi»ut. . . 1 *- t’ i-r> *■
ent the largol and Lr-t ar.ar.ged Hotd. <f
- ■
1 - • •
H r »n*r j- well fnrn -h-<1 thr ash - * and pre<* » m
Ti.rJ. -T accouirnmia:! >:i>-d any H-del n N'*rth«-in
California.
THE St NICHOLAS HOTEL CARRIAGE
Will he in Htlendanre on the ar-ival of the Rr.at
and Car-* aud convey pa.-senger- to U >■ II > .**.
THE CALIFORNIA STAGE COMPANY
■ • D •.-i. ; -Stan r«apaoy <rit} Mhrr
1.*.-w*D!r»r- at tbH aa d -tart from «h» M-tcl
du»>r erery morninp. Iv
M r. IWFFIC\ Pr- : ■ •
Huh, i- .i.
United States Hotel,
M \HI S\ IL.LK.
•WIH

l«e kej*t .<> i in*; 1 a-- il %u Onmiws h .
l»eon hand to convey psasenger* from the dep**t t<*
the hotel free of charge. >*ag- - leave thi- h »>,
for all part- of the Slate. The pah-mage of ib r
traveling j*u- .• j- v s-o!i. pr.}
Iv i w. C. nioKLs !• ...

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