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The weekly union record. [volume] (Oroville, Calif.) 1864-1866, March 17, 1866, Image 1

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VOL.. 13.
m UNION RECORD.
PUBLISHED EVERY
SATURDAY MORNING
JAS, WAGSTAFP, VM. DEMOTT,
Publisher? and Proprietors.
Offlc« on Bird Street, Between Myers and
Han toon Streets.
TERMS.
One year per Mall $5 00
months do 300 ]
Three months do 3 00 j
Delivered by Carrier per month 50
Single copies 10
ADVERTISEMENTS:
Per square of ten lines or less, first insertion.|3 00
Each subsequent insertion I 50
A liberal discount will be made ic favor of those
who advertise by the year.
Business Cards inserted on reasonable terms.
BUSINESS CARDS.
J. M. BURT,
Attornr>* ami Counsellor at Law, & Notary
Public.
Practices in the Courts of the Second Judicial
District, and in the Supreme Couit.
Office—On Bird street, in Burl's brick building,
op stairs, Oroville.
1... C. GRANGER,
Atlornry ami Counsellor at Law,
Will pra dice in the Federal and State Courts of
California.
Office—Over W. M. Elliott s Liquor Store,
2!untoon street, Oroville, California.
Dll. J. B. CHAV,
Office,
EXPRESS BUILDING, SECOND STREET,
Opposite Western House. Marysville.
MU J. M. VAICB,
Phyll c I a ii an *1 Surgeon,
Oroville.
May be consulted at all hours—from 10 o'clock
A. M * to 4 P. M., at the Drug Store of Colton A
Darrach on Montgomery street. At other times, on
Bird street, at his residence.
s. ROBBWBAUM,
Attorney' ami Connsfllor at Law, District
Attorney, and Notary Public.
Office—Court House,
Oroville.
DR. F. s. 89TOBR,
Wynmlnlte, Butte County, California.
Having permanently located in Wyandotte, may
lx* found at his office at all hours when not absent
on professional business.
JOHN DICK,
Justice of the Peace, ami Notary Public.
Office Theatre Building, opposite Court
House, Oroville.
• JKO. W. PRISTY,
Vnltefl States Collector for Butte County.
Office on Myers Street. l»etween Montgomery
and Bird Street. Oroville.
A. MAUKHICK, Jr.,
Attorney ami Counsellor at T.aw, will
Pr;u tiee in all of the Counties of the Second Ju*
dieial District. and in the Supreme Court.
Oftiee—On Myers street.
A. O. SIMPSON, \ I THUS. CALLOW.
A. c;. SIMPSON,
Wholesale and Retail Dealer in Books and Station
ery. Staple, ami Fa: y Articles,
Montgomny Street, Oroville.
D. C. BIRLINOAMK,
Dentist.
Office—Over Cheap John's Cloth-
X ing Store, Montgomery street,
Oroville.
J. KLOCII iV Co.,
AVltulr»alr ami Befall Dealers In Groceries,
Provisions aM> Produce,
Opposite Wells. Fargo A Co's. Office, Montgomery
street. Oroville.
GEO. C. PERKINS,
NVholesalele Retail Dealer In Groceries.
Provisions and Produce,
Corner Myers and Montgomery streets, Oroville.
K. DIM JAM,
I lilted States Assistant Assessor of Butte
County. California.
Office—On Myers street, Oroville.
\V. PR ATT, M. D.
Physician nml Surgeon, Rock. Creek,
Butte County. California.
lAIEB GRSSR,
Commissionv'u of Deeps for Nevada Territory.
Office—With County Clerk.
E. S. OWEN,
Attorney \ Counsellor at Law. Fobestown.
Butte County, California.
FALLEN Ell *V Co.,
Bankers,
Corner Myers and Montgomery streets, Oroville.
AVM. F.DMINDS.
County Surveyor!
Office—ln the Court House.
ItENBV VOI NC,
Surveyor. Oroville.
Wm. Faulkner & Son,
Importers of
CARDS AND CARD STOCK,
ALL COLORS.
PRINTING INK,
All Colors.
Bronzes, Varnish,
Printing Presses, Type and
PRINTI X G M ATKRIALB
Of Every Description.
OT.D TYPE METAL—Machinists may a t aT.
times be supplied with old Type Metal, by calling
at 411 C.av street,San Francisco,
n 42 Wm. FAULKNER X SON.
Sacramento Seminary!
FOR YOUJVG LADIES!
TENTH STREET, BETWEEN F AND G.
Sxurramrnto.
The next session will commence July 31st. and
close December 22 d. For Circulars, address
n3S-tf MR,or MRS. HERMON PERRY.
MAZER’S HOTEL
For Sale-
THE PROPERTY KNOWN AS THE MATER'S
Hotel, situated on Myers street, between Rob
inson and Bird, is offered tor sale at a great bar
gain. Terms made known bv application to
PETER SCfcUCHMACHER.
March 3d. I £O6. Myers street, Oroville.
THE WEEKLY UNION RECORD.
SALOONS.
KELLY’S SALOON!
HUXTOOX STREET, OROVILLE
(Successor to PlatDlp Farreily.)
The subscriber takes this method
of informing old customers and the public gen
erally, that he has purchased, and is now sole pro
prietor of the well-known “Farrelly Saloon.*' situ
ated on Huntoon street, Oroville, and that the
same will be conducted as a
FIRST CLASS SALOON,
where the public are assured that the BAR will
always be furnished with the FINEST BRANDS of
Wines,
Brandies,
Liquors,
English Ales,
Porter,
Cigars,
And in short, every article usually kept in a No. 1
Saloon.
A FINE LUNCH is spread daily at 10 o'clock.
No expense or trouble will be spared to make
“KELLY’S SALOON,*’ a place of resort worthy
the patronage of the citizens of Oroville and Butte
County. A liberal share of patronage is respect
fully solicited.
GEORGE KELLEY, Proprietor.
Oroville, October 7th. ISGS. 43
BANK EXCHANGE
Comer and Myers Streets,
OROVILLE.
fBMIE ATTENTION OP THE PUBLIC IS RE-
S spectfully called to the above First Class
Saloon, where the
First Quality of Liquors
Of ai l Kinds
ARE KEPT CONSTANTLY'
Also, the best article of
LAGER BEER!
This Cellar Saloon is the most pleasant retreat
in hot Summer days, and has the most extensive
accommodations. In connection with it is
A Splendid Shoot ins Gallery,
For Sportsmen. The public have the thanks of
the proprietors tor a liberal patronage, and solicit
a continuance of the same.
TF.BO HEINS,
August 10,1565. WM. SCHNEIDER.
CITY BREWERY!
And Brewery Saloon,
Myers Sticet, Oroville.
f|xHE UNDERSIGNED RESPECTFULLY I\-
u forms the public and his old friends, that he
is now manufacturing, and keeps constantly on
hand, a large and superior quality of
LAGER BEER!
FOR WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
Ten Gallons, S-"*
Five Gallons, £ -»0
All Orders
Will be promptly attended to. that are left at
the Bank Exchange Saloon, on Montgomery street,
or at the
CITY BREWERY,
Myers Street.
A liberal share of the public patronage is re
spectfully solicited.
Wm. SCHNEIDER.
November l<th, ISGS.
Fresh Supply of Liquors
AT TPK
PLAZA SALOON!
X. ZAMBELICH, Proprietor.
Opposite the Court House.
On the Corner of Bird and Iluntoon Sts.
rj**HE UNDERSIGNED RESPECTFULLY IX-
I f Tins his old friends and the public generally,
that he has just received a large and fresh supply
of Liquors, Wines, etc., of a
SUPERIOR QUALITY.
His numerous customers are assured that he
keeps but one quality of liquors, and that is of the
best quality. All are treated alike. Liquors all
warranted, pure, of the best quality. Everything
> kept as in the most fashionable saloon.
Winter Drinks A No. 1.
N. B.—Orders physicians attended to with
the greatest promptness.’
Thankful tor the liberal patronage extended to
him in the past, he solicits a contTr.aance of the
same. N. ZAMBELiCH.
Oroville, May 27th. l>bo.
VINEYARD FOR SALE
OR REXT.
ONE AND A HALF MILES FROM ORO
ville. 4.300 bearing vines, 24 varieties. the
most valuable lor wine, raisins and market. Three
hundred fro it trees, pears, plums, peaches, apri
cots and quinces. Four hundred young quinces
and MX) rooted tines in nursery lo set out. A fine
opportunity tor irrigating and an abundance of
wood with* I*2o acres of land. The above ranch
and vineyard will be sold cheap for cash. Enquire
at OroTtUe of Geo. C. Perkin* and Judge w. 6.
Saflbrd. 4w-5I
OROVILLE, SATURDAY MORNING, MARCH IT, 1866.
HOTELS.
UNION HOTEL.
Corner Montgomery and Myers Street,
OROVI L L E .
This new brick and elegantly fur
nished Hotel stands first in the State for com
fort and accommodation for the traveling public—
every room being well ventilated and neatly fur
nished.
The Table
Is supplied with every LUXURY OF THE SEAS
ON, and everything will be done to insure the
Com tort of the guest of this House. In connec
tion with this House is the
Bar and Billiard Saloon.
New Billard Tables of the Latest Patterns and
Improvements.
The Bar
Will always be supplied with CHOICE LIQUORS
and CIGARS. PBICES MODERATE.
The Office of California Stage Company
Is at the UNION HOTEL.
STAGES LEAVE THIS HOUSE DAILY, FOR
All parts of the Country.
Wm. L. HOPKINS, Proprietor.
Oroville, October 14,1^65.
ST. NICHOLAS HOTEL,
OUOVILLE.
TAKE PROPRIETORS OF THIS FAVORITE
Hotel would most respectfully inform the trav
eling public and permanent Boarders that the ST.
NICHOLAS, is now being thoroughly REPAIRED
ENLARGED AND IMPROVED IN ALL ITS
DEPARTMENTS, and they are now prepared to
offer superior inducements to their patrons and the
public in general-
Bu si ness men and travelers will find the ST.
NICHOLAS second to no Hotel in the State,
whether as regards LUXURV, COMFORT oil
ECONOMY.
The ST. NICHOLAS will always be kept as a
First Class Hotel.
The Table
Will at all times be served up with the greatest
variety of eatables—the best the market affords—
and in a style to suit the most fastidious taste.
A Splendid Bar.
Is connected with the House, where will he found
the very best of Liquors and Cigars. Also,
Two fine Billiard Tables
A fine Reading Room is also attached to this
House, constantly supplied with the latest dailies
and periodicals.
The proprietors, by strict attention to the com
fort of their guests, hope to give satisfaction to all
who may favor them with their patronage.
H. B. HUNT.
Oroville, Sept. Oth, 1865. P. R. MOORE.
LONGVILLE HOTEL!
A. J. AA’OOD, Proprietor,
fMATTIS LARGE AND COMMODIOUS HOTEL
M is situated in Humbug Valley. Plumas county,
in a beautiful and healthy location. The rooms
are large and airy and well furnished. The table
is at all times turnished with the best the market
affords; the stabling is of the best. It is a‘ home
tor the traveller." For the invalid a fine soda
spring, celebrated for its healing qualities, is ad
joining the Hotel. A liberal share of patronage is
solicited. A. J. WOOD. Proprietor.
YOUNG & ANDERSON,
jmT
WATCHMAKERS,
Jewlers,
Opticians & Engravers,
Montgomery Street, Oroville.
4LLWORK IN OUR LINE ATTENDED TO
prompth'. and at low rates.
San Francisco
LAGER BEER!
Manufactured at Philadelphia Bretrery ’
The undersigned keeps constant
ly on hand a large supply ot the best quality
of San Francisco Lager, which he will sell as fol
lows:
Ten gallon keg for six dollars.
Five gallon keg for three dollars.
All orders will be filled promptly by calling at
his Saloon, on Montgomery street, under Colton A
Darrach's Drag Store. Oroville. H. HONS.
May 13th. I>»>3. n2e-lf
Flower Roots for Sale!
A CHOICE SELECTION OF
Sweet Williams, Primrose.
Pansies, Penstemon,
Corn-bottle. Coreopsis.
Alyssam, Petunia,
V*rbascum
And other flower roots, will be sold cbeap.
Greenbacks taken at par. For sale by
C. E. CAMPBELL. Florist.
Thompson Flat, Butte county. California.
January 37,1566. nl3-tf
The Wooden End of the Board.
General Banks, in a recent speech
delivered at Washington, in favor of
negro suffrage, told this anecdote :
"When I was younger than I am, in
the State of New Hampshire, at the
town of Nashua, where I obtained my
education at a university with a belfry
at the top and a water-wheel under the
lower stories [laughter], .looking out
with my associates and fellow students
upon the smooth and glassy surface of
the Merrimac river, that stream of per
petual beauty and perpetual life, we
saw a colored boy, intimately known to
us, upon the surface, engaged in the
pleasant exercise of skating, for it was
Winter. While we looked upon the
beautiful Merrimac, the little negro boy
suddenly went in. You may never
have seen a negro under such circum
stances. We went down to him with
all the speed possible. Going out to
the middle of the river, we took up a
plank and handed it to the little negro,
and he grasped it w ith as much alacrity
as any one of them will take a ballot
when we give it to him. Just as we
had got it on the hole into which he had
fallen, he fell off the plank and went in
again. The second time he came up,
he wore an expression I shall never
forget. You never have seen a negro
under such circumstances. He was
speechless; his emotions suppressed all
rhetoric; he did not indulge in any
eloquence at all. He grasped the plank
this time, not with alacrity, but with
ferocity, and we brought him again to
the surface. We thought he was a
negro saved from the jaws of death ;
but oft’ the little fellow slipped and went
down. You may never have seen a negro
under such circumstances. [Laughter.]
We handed him the plank again, but
he did not touch it this time. You may
never have seen a negro refuse a plank
under such circumstances. Ho addressed
us a speech, and I never heard a speech
that contained so much of touching
eloquence as was embodied in that little
negro’s speech : ‘Please gib dis nigger
de wooden end ob dat board !’ [Laugh
ter.] You see the end we had given
him was the icy end. It was the same
icy end that the Southern people have
been holding out to him for two hundred
years. He was entirely sati-fied that
the wooden end was the best. Now, sir,
what we propose for the negro in this
country is to give iiim the wooden end
of the board. He has had the icy end
for more than two centuries. The
desolation of more than moral retribution
lias come upon the men who extended to
him the icy end of the hoard, and come
upon them justly. 1 wish now to give
him the wooden end of the board. He
will receive from that act of justice the
same joy which that little negro expe
rienced.
Extraordinary Presentiment of
Death.—A Mexican woman known as
“little Carlotta,” but whose name is
Carlotta Espersa, died in this city, on
Friday last, under very strange circum
stances, showing that she had an extra
ordinary presentiment that she would
cease to live on that day. On Friday
morning, she arose from her bed in the
enjoyment, apparently, of good health,
and proceeded, as usual, to the prepar
ation of her morning meal and her
general household duties. Whilst on
joying her breakfast, in company with
a young man who boarded with her, she
told him it was her wish that he would
remain with her during the day, and not
go to his work, for, said she, "after to
day, you will never see me again alive.
I will die before night.’’ He scouted
the idoa and made fun of it. She per
sisted that her presentiment would be
fulfilled, and he, to pacify her, promised
to remain witli her, which he did.
During the course of the dav, she con-
C * '
versed with the young man repeatedly
on the subject of her coming demise,
and insisted that she would die before
night. She gave him particular direc
tions in regard to her funeral expenses,
and told him not to go around and beg
money from the neighbors to bury her,
but to go to Judge Fowler, the Mayor
of the city, and get him to have her
buried at the expense of the city. All
of which he promised to do. Towards
evening, while sitting in a chair, giving
them directions, and without a sign that
dissolution of soul from body was about
taking place, and without a struggle, she
died. Yesterday morning, the young
man repaired to the Mayor and procured
the necessary order for her funeral ex
penses, and she was buried, yesterday,
at the expense of the city, as requested.
Marysville Appeal , March 11 th~
The Snow.
[The f, How in g beautiful poem i» rsaifi to have
been written by an actress, and originally appeared
in a New York paper, several years ag-o. It has
been likened to Hood's •* Bndge of Sisrhs" in its
touching pathos and smooth versification-}
Oh 1 the snow, the beautiful snow.
Filling the sky and the earth below;
Over the housetops, over the street.
Over the heads o! the people you meet;
Dancing.
Flirting,
Sk:mming along.
Beautiful snow! it can do nothing wrong;
Flying to kiss a fair lady’s cheek
Clinging to lips in a frolicsome freak—
Beautiful snow ! Iron the heavens above,
Pure as an angel, and fickle as love !
Oh ! the snow, the beautiful snow !
How the flakes gather and laugh as they go !
Whirling about in its maddening fun.
It plays in its glee with every one;
Chasing.'
Laughing.
Hurrying by.
It lights up the face, aud it sparkles the eye:
And even the dogs, with a bark and a bound.
Snap at the crystals that eddy around;
The town is alive, and its heart in a glow,
To welcome the coming of beautiful snow.
Flow the wild crowd goes swaying along.
Hailing each other with humor and song !
H *w the gay sledges, like meteors, fl.ish by,
Bright for a’moment, then lost to Hie eye;’
Ringing.
Swinging.
Da.-b.ing they go.
Over the crust of the beautiful snow:
Snow so pure when it falls from the sky.
To he trampled in rand by the cn»wd rushing by—
To be trampled and tracked by the thousands of
feet
Till it blends with the filth in the horrible street.
Once I was pure as the snow—h it I fell I
Fell, like the snow flakes, from Heaven—to hell;
Fell, to be tramj-led as filth o! the street—
Fell. l-> be scoffed, to be spit on. and beat;
Pleading.
Curing.
Dreading to die.
Selling my soul to whoever would buy:
Dealing in >hame for a morsel of bread,
Hating the living and fearing the dead;
Merciful Hod I have 1 fallen so low ?
And yet I was once like this beautiful snow I
Once I was fair as the beautiful snow.
With an eye like its- cry-tal. a heart like its glow;
Once I was loved for my innocent grace—
Flattered and sought lor the charms of my face;
Father,
Mother,
Si.-ter. all,
God, and myself, I have lost by my fall;
The veriest wretch that goes shivering by
Will take a wide sweep, lest 1 wander too nigh;
For, of all that is on .»r about me, I know
There is nothing that's pure but the beautiful snow.
How strange it should be that this beautiful snow
Should tall on a sinner with no where to go !
How strange it would be, when the night comes
again.
If the snow and the ice struck my desperate brain !
Fainting,
Freezing,
Dying alone I
Too wicked for prayer, too weak for my moan
To be heard in the crash of the crazy town.
Gone mad in their joy at the snow's coming down;
To lie and to die in my terrible woe.
With a bed and a shroud of the beautiful snow I
Scandal in Hoosierdom—lndian
apolis is rife with scandalous stories.
A distinguished citizen has created a
sensation in connection with the young
and fascinating wife of a venerable and
confiding gentleman. A physician has
found it convenient to retire to private
life on account of the unfavorable ter
mination of a case from one of the
adjoining counties, wherein a young,
beautiful, accomplished and weelthy girl
died under his treatment. The walls
of the city are plastered with circulars
denouncing a certain gay and festive
young gentleman as a scoundrel, villain,
and such like pet names. A lady whose
virtue lie had attempted is said to have
taken this extraordinary means of
“showing him up.” Another young
gentleman, who had been writing letters
to a school-girl, with dishonorable intent,
was drawn into an ambuscade by the
fair decoy, and cowbidcd within an inch
of his life by a lusty male relative. A
gentleman who spends some of his time
in New York, the other day wrote an
affectionate letter to bis mi.-tress, to join
him, and inclosing §SO as traveling
expenses. At the same time, he wrote
a loving and dutiful epistle to his con
fiding wife, full of regrets and lies.
Unfortunately the two letters got mixed,
and that intended for the leman was
sent to the wife. Of course, there was
a row, and divorce talked about, but the
Lothario finally succeeded in making
the impression that it was all a joke;
that Miss was a fictitious person
age, and the whole matter was gotten
up to have a little fun at his wife's
expense, whom he knew to be slightly
inclined to jealousy. The wife made
fifty dollars by it, anyhow.
In a town in Connecticut resides a
man who made a fortune in the mi.k
business, by not giving full measures.
As he grew rich, he thought he would
change his occupation to something
more respectable, and accordingly
bought a gri.-t mill. In conversation
C C
with Lis wife, be said he did not feel
right about the cheating be had prac
ticed in the milk business, and wished a
way could be devised whereby he could
repay in the grist mill what he had
cheated in the other. At last, they
settled on the following plan, which was
to have the measures with which they
took toll as much too large as the milk
measures were too small.
The Agricultural Department at
Washington is in receipt of the seeds
of some 80,000 trees, shrubs, plants,
fruits, and vegetables, sent home by our
Consul in Japan, all indigenous to that
country, and a'very large majority of
them total strangers among us.
I The Mississippi Levees. —Major
General Humphreys, who commanded
the Second Corps during the last period
of the rebellion, is, bv order of the War
Department, engaged in examining into
the extent of damages to the levees of
the Mississippi river, made bv the war,
with a view to repairing them. From
1850 to 1861, he was occupied in ascer
taining the best method , f protecting
the valley from the effects of tloods.
His report was very interesting, espe
cially in a scientific point of view, and
his observations respecting the Missis
sippi delta are directly opposed to the
theory of Sir Charles Lyell, the cele
brated English geologist. The latter
has concluded that the delta has been
at least one hundred thousand years in
forming, and in his recent work on the
Antiquity of Man. he admits a calcula
tion, according to which a human skele
ton found at the depth of sixteen feet
below the surface is about fifty thousand
years old. General Humphreys, on the
other Land, demonstrates that it is only
between four and five years since the
delta began to be formed, and that the
present bed of the river, instead of being
alluvial, is of blue clay, much older than
the present geological period. So far
as the evidence which Sir Charles
adduces in favor of reckoning the age
of man on this planet at a hundred
thousand years or more, is derived from
the Valley of the Mississippi, it is not
sustained by the evidence furnished by
General Humphreys.
The total cost of levees which may
be depended upon, from the mouth of
the Ohio to that of the Mississippi, will
be $26,000,000. The levees, in 1861,
were considered worth $2,000,000. —
Hartford Post.
There is more truth than poetry in
the following from the Humboldt (Ne
vada) Register : The other lodgers at
a corral in California, in early times,
complained of one who was continually
guilty of unseemly sounds while sleep
ing. It grew unbearable, and a medical
examination was procured. The man
of medicine discovered that the offender's
skin was too short; that when he shut
his eyes, the air inhaled through the
nostrils found vent through the mouth
or elsewhere, causing the obnoxious
sounds; and that the only remedy was
to keep the man awake till he should die.
That is the way this coast is afflicted.
It was all right while the miners were
wanted only in California; but, since
1854, they have been wanted in so many
other places, that it makes trouble.
There is a shortness; and when the
miners leave California fur Washoe, or
Washoe for Grenada or Montana, a
collapse occurs. There is need of more
people. Oregon, California, Nevada,
Idaho, and Montana, ought to have
12,000,000 of people distributed over
them. When it comes to running all
this expanse of rich territory with about
half a million, the population gets
mighty light every place but that where
the latest excitement is.
Steady Habits. —Emerson, in his
book on English character, speaks of an
old town in England where a piece of
bread and a draught of beer are given
to every one who should ask it at the
gate. This is paid for from a fund
bequeathed for that purpose in 1136
more than seven hundred years ago.
To show how such trusts arc abused,
however, it is complained that a minister
takes .£2,000 per annum from the in
come of the fund intended for the poor,
while this small pittance is only spent
on small beer and crumbs. Considering
the comparative ages of the nations, we
can nearly match that in this country.
About 1775, the Hon. Theodore Atkin
son, of Portsmouth, New Hampshire,
left a legacy of £I,OOO, the income of
which was directed to be distributed in
loaves of bread to the poor of the town
every Sunday. This has been done
regularly for nearly a century ; about
£5,000 have been thus spent, and the
fund has not been impaired.— Historical
.Magazine.
Mormonism Exemplified. —The
Salt Lake Vedette of February 20th
savs: ‘‘A Mormon at Coalville, Sum
mit county, forty miles from here, had
two ; babies ’ born to him the other
night, by two of his wives, with just
forty minutes difference between the
infants’ ages ! But what's the worst
about the barbarous thing is that one
of those wives is the other's mother—
not an uncommon case in L tah ! ”
The proud have no friends —not in
prosperity, for then they know nobody;
nor in adversity, for then nobody knows
them.
NO. s*o.
The Mute Detective. — “ No dogs
admitted, sir," said the porter to a gay
assemblage, as a young man appeared
at the entrance. “ You must leave him
behind if you go in.”
" Very Well,” said the young man.
“ Stay about here. Prince, till I come
back.”
And ho joined the crowd within ; but
by and by the young man w ished to
refer to his watch, when, behold ! the
chain had boon snapped in two, and the
valuable time piece was gone. He
considedod the case a moment, and then
a sudden thought flashed in his mind.
So, stepping out, lie whispered the fact
to the porter, and gained permission to
take his dog in for a minute or two.
“ Look here, Prince,” said he, “you
knowing dog, my watch is stolen and
he showed him the empty pocket and
the cut chain. “Do you understand,
oldffcllow I In there, sir, is the thief.
You find it. my good doggie, and I’ll
get you a famous treat. You under-
C »
stand, do you ?”
Prince wagged Ids head and tail, and
gave bis master a wonderfully knowing
look, and then the two stole quietly into
the place again. Quietly his dumb
detective glided around among the peo
ple. smelling at this one's coat and that
one's chain, until at last he set his teeth
firmely into the coat-tail of a gentccl
looking man, and could not be shaken
off. The young man quietly made
known the case to the bystanders, who
gathered around him, and had the
thief’s pockets duly searched. Six
other watches were found upon him,
which he had gathered up in the course
of the morning, and which their right
ful owners were glad to get their hands
on again. Prince selected out his mas
tor’s property in a twinkling, as that
was all he cared for, and gave it to him
joyfully. It would have taken a ycry
keen police to do work so neatly and
quickly; and all agreed that he merited
as good a dinner as a dog could have.
A good beef bone and a bowl of milk
satisfied all wants, and then he was
just as ready to do the same favor again.
Some philosophical wretch says that
“age is venerable in man, and would bo
in woman —if she ever grew old!”
Every woman acknowledges that she is
growing old until she reaches twenty.
After that, nobody has a right to ques
tion her. There is a belief current that
when she arrives at that age, she dis
covers the fountain of perpetual youth
so vainly sought by Ponce dc Leon, but
whether it consists in exercise and fresh
air or cosmetics and cotton, we have
never ventured to inquire. There are
sanctuaries which would be profaned by
the footsteps of man, and chief among
these is the place where woman puts
herself together and takes herself apart.
W ere mankind one-half as inquisitive
as the gentler sex (so called), this mys
tery would have been solved long ago ;
and it is still questionable whether or
not some modern Paul Pry will not tell
us all about it, though we should be
sorry to have him do so. We prefer to
take the ladles at their word, and shall
thank no scoffing infidel for undermining
our faith in the ability of woman to
remain young just as long as she chooses.
Champaign Cnion.
Among the sports in Australia is that
of hunting the emu. A few months
ago, a Sydney paper tells us, as a Mr.
Davidson, of the Black Range, was
riding into town, he fell in with an emu
at Belle Vale, and gave it chase. The
bird, which was an old stager, and fully
six feet high, took in the direction of the
town, and its pursuer was in hopes of
being able to drive it in alive; but, on
coming to the fences, many of which
intervene between Belle ale and Yass,
the bird succeeded in making for the
bush, still hotly pursued. Fortunately,
Mr. Davidson was on a staunch cob,
that kept well up to the game, and after
a chase of between seven and eight
miles, the emu become fairly exhausted
and an easy prey to its pursuer. The
emu resembles the ostrich somewhat in
size and appearance.
Sharp.— Judge Kelley was descan
ting, in presence of President Johnson,
upon the repulsive appe-arance of the
ovster. “It isn’t handsome, Judge,”
said the President, “but it has the ad
vantage of you in one thing.” “What
is that ?” queried Kelley, who is an
exhaustless talker. “It knows when to
shut its mouth,” replied Mr. Johnson.
Men will always be apt to think the
money market is tight if they are in
the unfortunate habit of getting so
themselves.

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