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Morning appeal. [volume] (Carson City, Nev.) 1877-1906, December 09, 1877, Image 2

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MORNING APPEAL.
SISDAT DECEMBER 9. 1S77
SUNDAY READING.
Last Sunday we treated our readers to some
parts of a sermon by Rev. Joseph Cook. Again
we call attention to some of Lis sayings. In
a sermon upon "organic instincts in con
science"' wc find him expressing himself in the
following manner more brilliant, it seems to
U3 than coherent or logical. Addressing himself
to the distinction between instinct and reason,
he says : "There are organic and instinctive
activities o conscicnco by which wc forbodc
punishment or anticipate reward Who denies
this? Not Nero when he stabs himself, or
causes his servants to hold the sword on which
he falls. Not Nero when he hears groans from
the grave of his mother whom he murdered
the other da-, at Baiae. Tacitus says, as I
recollect at this moment, that Nero, after he
' murdered Agrippina, heard the sound of a
trumpet and groans from her grave. Ho had
had no Christian education. He had not been
brought up wrongly, and probably did not feel
as Hume did that it was necessary to explain
his qualms of conscience by a shock he re
ceived in his youth. Nero had an education
drawn out of the black sky and the blood
soaked sods of old Rome ; and yet he anticipa
ted the action of the Furies behind the veil.
Who will stand here and affirm that these in
stincts which in all aes have expressed them
selves in what all religions have taught as to
the Furies and Nemesis and the Avenging
Fates, and as to 'what awaits us in time to
come beyond death, are not expressions of an
organic and ineradicable instinct in man ? If
God makes an instinct, there is always some
tiling to match it. The instinct of the migrat
ing bird finds a South to match it, an ear
sound to match it, a fin water to match it
We walk directly out uon this uuiversal or
ganic possession of man and infer the exis
tence of the other side of it. The poor bee
throws out its antennce and touches things
near it, and conscience throwsout her anten
naj and touches things behind the veil. Con
science makes cowards of us all, not on ac
count of anything tliis side the veil, but of
something on the other side. But when con
science makes cowards of us all, is it merely
of some arrangement of the molecular atoms
in the universe, merely of some shiver of the
uki'.nate particles of thi3 inert stuff that we
call matter, merely of a somewhat, or is it o
a someone that conscience makes us afraid
I have yet to find a materialistic philosopher
who does not admit that this foreboding or
ganic instinct is human. This is the way con
science is made ; and I undertake to sav that
it is not bunglingly and mendaciously made.'
Still upon the same subject, and also still pur
suing the view and strain of a man whose tone
seems to mean " I, at least, am competent to
treat of science, with the scientists ; for am
not a scholar? and doth not my theology keep
paco with my enlightenment?" There seems
indeed, under his audacity of tone and clever
ness of rhetoric this sort of a self satisfied
swagger. But it is good reading, noni
less as for example: "Let your thoughts run
through the vistas of historical precedents. Call
up Socrates with his protesting genius, which
always told him what not to do. C;tll up every
great poet that has addressed t iC Muses ; call
up every orator that has invoked the aid of
the gods ; remember Demosthenes there on
the Bema, looking abroad on the matchless
landscape, the temples, the tombs of the men
who fell at Salamis, and yet invoking, above
them all, the immortal gods. Remember that
no public state assembly was opened at Athens
in her best days unless precjJad by prayer.
A dripping cloud would disperse an audience
in the Pnyx, and that because men thouglrt
that this portent indicated that the gods were
against their assembling. Votive tablets to
Jupiter clothed the naked rocks at the sides
of the Bema. Even your Napoleon believes
in a protecting genius. Lowell pictures the
first man ia his naturalness as God-conquered
with his face to heaven upturned. In our
highest moments wc instinctively speak of a
oomeonc, and not merely of a somewhat.
Riohter says that when a child fir3t witnesses
a thunder storm, when the greatest objects of
nature, such as the Alps, the Hiinalaj-as or the
ocean, come before the mind for the first time,
then i3 the moment in which to speak of God ;
fjr the sublime everywhere awakens thc-
thought, not only cf a somewhat but of a
someone behind it. Not a somewhat merely,
but a someone walks on Niagara's watery rim.
The further up you ascend the Alp3, if your
thoughts are awake, the more near you come
to anticipated communion, not only with
somewhat, but with someone higher than the
Alp3, or than the visible heavens that are to
be rolled away. There arc in the midnights
on the ocean voices that the waves do not ut
ter. I have paced to and fro on the deck of a
steamer midway between England and Amer
ica, and remembered that Greenland wa3 on
the north, and Africa and the Tropic Islands
on the south in the resounding, seething dark ,
and my home behind me, and the mother is'...;
before me. Lying on the deck and looking
into, the topgallants and watching them sway
to and fro am6ng the constellations, and lis
tening to the roll of the great deep, I have
given myself I hope some opportunity to stu!
the voices of nature there ; but I assure you
that m7 experience has been like that of eTe: y
other traveler in the moments when the sub
limities of the sea and the star3 have spoken
Ja'udest. A somewhat and a somcoas greater I
turn tney spoko louder yet. ihe mos;
audible word uttered in that midnight in the
centre of the Atlantic was not concerning Af
rica or America or England, or the tumbling
icebergs of the North, but of the someone who
holds all the immensities and the eternities in
his palm as tho small dust of the balance,
Was that natural ? Was it instinctive? Or was
thi3 mood a forced attitude of spirit? I should
have thought I M as not human if I had not
had a tendency to such a mood. I should
have been a stunted growth : I had almost
said a lightning-smitten trunk without the fo
liage that belongs to the upper faculties, with
out the sensitiveness that comes from the cul
tare of one's whole nature, if I had not fe!
behind the somewhat of the material glob
the someone giving it order."
Ths Era of Good Feeling.
It
Under date of Washington Dec. 7 we have
tho following pleasant information from Car
oiina : The last issue of the Charleston
South Carolina, News and Courier received
here has an editorial warning the colored Re
publicans of Charleston not to support at the
municipal elections, next week, the Indepen
dent ticket composed of colored Republican
and Independent white Democrats. The ar
tide causes considerable comment here.
says : ' Upon tho colored people of Charles
ton will rest the responsibility for the defea
of the Democratic ticket. Any attempt
defeat the Democratic ticket by the colored
people will rekindle the angry feelings that
were fast dying out, the old color line will be
re-established and the whites will be pitted
souarely against the blacks. Does any col
ored man doubt the result of such a contest
the State government in every department
being controlled by Democrats ?"
London, Dec. 8. The present is regarded
as the supreme crisis in Turkish affairs in Bui
garia, whose result will be the relief of Osman
Pasha or the collapse of Turkish resistence
outside the quadrilateral and north of the
Balkans. The Turcophils journals are des
pondent this evening, and and think Sulei
man has been so slow in following up his
successes that he will gain no substantial ad
vantages. A correspondent at Bucharest tele
graphs that no alarm i3 felt at the headquar
ters of the Czarwitz, who, although he has
only 75,000 men, has his position so elabar
ately fortified as to compensate for the infer
iority to the Turks in numbers. It is believed
possible that Suleiman may secure temporary
and isolated success, but it is impossible that
he can force the Russian position on the Jan
tra line of intrenchments. In view of the
belief that Suleiman has drawn his forces
west of the quadrilteral and attacked the
Czarwitz, General Zimmerman has been
ordered to strike the Turkish communications
botwecn Verna and Shumala. Unless the
Turks succeed in defeating the Czarwitz they
ire likely to get much the worst of the present
move, it is still believed at Bucharest that
the attack qy Stileiman was inteuded as a
heavy feint to make some important move
ment to draw the Kussians from Plevna and
permit Osman to break through. Including
the garrisons of the quadrilatrel and the
Army of the Doburdscha, the Turks have
130,090 men in eastern Bulgaria, and a heavy
torce of irregulars. That Suleim attacked
with so small a force indicates that a general
uovement wa3 intonded.
A correspondent at Pera says that a gen
eral advance has been begun by Suleiman
for the purpose of thinning the left wing of
the Czarowitz and cutting off the Russians
from Schipka. He says the Turks still held
all the points gained, and that a heavy en
gagement took place on yesterday from Pla
cova to Chuiun cast and southeast of Tirnova,
in which the Russians fell back uuder cover
of the night. Tho events of the next five
day3 are regarded in London as sure to be
decisive of the campaign, and probably as the
end of the war.
A telegram from Sistova states Tirnoqa by
speedy reinforcements from Biela is fully se
cured against surprise from Suleiman Pasha.
A WONDERFUL SPECIMEN.
Mr. Hart of the Sazerackers relates the
following: His attire would have excited
the cupidity of a soap-fat man, and just as he
stood he would have afforded first-class raw
material for working up in a soap factory.
He was the greasiest looking man ever seen
in Austin since the man fell into a barrel of
lard oil up at the Manhattan mill. Likewise,
he was oily-tongued ; but there was a tired,
far-away look in his eye and an unsteady mo
tion to his legs that denoted him an out-and-out
old bum. He walked into the saloon and
employed himself in examining the mineral
cabinet. After a close scrutiny of the con
tents of the cabinet he turned to tho bar
keeper and remarked : " You've got some
powerful rich rock in thar'. ' " Yes," curtly
replied tho barkeeper, in a tone which plainly
indicated that in that little word was wrapped
up and concealed the sentence, " You don't
git no drink out of me, you dog-goncd old
stiff." " Yes," continued tho greasy man,
" powerful rich rock ; but up to my cabin
I've got the alfiredest richest and most pecu
liarest piece of rock you ever seed in all your
life. I brung it from Arizony ; digged it my
self and I wouldn't take most nothin' for it."
The barkeeper is an enthusiastic collector
of specimens and he pricked up his cars and
was all attention while the man was speaking
of hi3 marvelous piece of ore. He had lived
in this couutry long endugh to know that a
man's attire is not always a sure indication of
his financial condition, and that it frequently
happens that men presenting a ragged ap
pearance have a considerable amount of coin
stowed in their clothes, or buried under their
cabins, or deposited in bank ; and he thought
it would not cost a great deal to be polite to
this stranger, and perhaps he could wheedle
him out of that wonderful specimen. Set
ting a bottle out ou the bar and smiling his
sweetest smile, he said : " Come up, stran
ger, and take a smile. "
The stranger grasped the bottle, upturned
it and took a smile about two inches deep.
When he had swallowed the smile and wiped
his mouth on his coat-sleeve the barkeeper
asked him what he called his specimen, and
would he not bring it down sometime and
let him see it.
" It's very rare stuff," said the stranger,
" the experts down to Arizony call it chloride
of sodium, and I give a small piece of it to a
fellnr what keeps this restaurant below here,
but I'll bring my piece down and give it
to you to-morrow."
To-morrow has not yet come ; but since the
barkeeper has learned that chloride of so
dium is only common salt he has bought a
new pick handle and built a signal service
station in which to lay for the man who was
going to give him that specimen.
GREAT HOLIDAY DISPLAY!
ft-7 m
WATCHES,
JEWELRY, SILVERWARE. BOOKS, STATIONERY, KOTIOHS,
FANCY CCODS,
PIANOS,
STOLQ
TOYS
TOYS
ETC ETC.
TOYS ! ! !
ETC.,
JOECKT GS . POS'S
HOLIDAY
Cliristmas is Oomlng? 1
SD IX ORDER TO MEET THE DEJIAXI) FOR HI'. (SOXACLG COIHUS THE
L undersigned is replenishing his stock with carefully selected purchases of tho
Finest Watches and Watch Chains, both Co!d and Silver;
The latest and handsomest patterns of
oF JEm 77 HI L HrL
Tho mas' decant and desirable
bf E R W A R
o
E L
E
A rare collection of Cooks of
POETRY, ART, ROMANCE, HISTORY AND THE DRAMA ;
And an endless variety of Fine Envelopes and choice Writing Paper, Cards, Etc.;
PL1XOS, Ffff PIANOS, fiff PIANOS !
Of the very bejt make and pattern, including Stoinway's and other first rate manufacturers; a
NOtiO!lS9 A CKEAT PBOFTSIOX OF FAStY GOODS s FOtiOIISt
GUNS, CUTLERY, FINE PISTOLS, AMMUNITION AN3 FISH1NQ TACK'.F.
WITHOUT END.
And in the most exhaustion assortment.
In fine, the stock comprises the very larjest and beat scluutlonj of all kinds of.
HOLIDAY GOOD
Ever brought to this market. They will be sold at the VERY LOWESTP PRICES ever tiked i.i N
e-CALL AND TAKE A LOOK."U
Vada.
JOHN G. FOX,
PKOPKIETOK.
Carson City, December 5, 1877
dcftn
SEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
CARSON THEATER.
TWO NICHTS ONLY !
THUKSDAY & SATUKDAY,
December 13 and 15,
AND
GILLSON & BARBER
Rave on Rand and OflVr for Sale a Largo
and Well Selected Stock of
GENERAL MERCHANDISE,
WHICH WE OFFER AT AS I.OTVRT""S
as any legitimate house in the trade can uosiM-.'
afford to sell and pay their honest debts.
Rice & Tickner,
E K A L, IXSERANClii AGENTS,
CA3S0N CITY, NEVADA.
CAPTAIN JACK COMBINATION.
j CAPTAIN JACK and MISS HEX A, assisted by a
powerful company, ma realistic drama of American Iron
tier Life and Adventure, es;ecial!y written and arranged
by r red. (i. ileader, the author of Joa Murphy s "ileip,
jlaura Ore, and other successes, cnt.tlee
CAPTAIN JACK!
The Poet Sc at of Ihe Black Bills!
Chandor. TI113 statement is rather inter
estin? than otherwise : J. A. Chandor. th
traveling companion of Mrs. Ralston, is rec
ognized in New York as a notorious confi
dencc man. The detectives say that five
tears ago he was known as one of the shrewd
est confidence operators in that city. Hi
plan was to get acquainted with foreigners
who were about returning to Europe and pre
tend that he was going in the same steamer ;
that his baggage was already on board. He
would then borrow all the money he could
get his victims to trust him with, and disap
pear. Lassallo Chandor, his father, was one
of the most notorious confidence men in the
United States about thirty years ago, and
served a term in the penitentiary for defraud
ing Charles Joseph Affher out of a large sum
of money and jewelry. His trial occupied
the court six days, and was quite celebrated,
One of the defendant s counsel was Joseph
L. White, at one time a prominent lawj'er
or California.
Careless Handling of Arms. The Csr
son Valley News of Friday has the follow
ing : Wednesday evening Henry Wyatt and
several other boys were fooling with a Henry
rifle in Eaycraft's bar room, when they acci
dently discharged the same. The ball passed
through the ceiling and floor above and up
by the side of the bed where Hewitt was ly
ing sick, mhsing liia body but a few inches,
passed out through the window.
CAPTAIN JACK By the Original
Kin x (a younj Irish girl living on the
Plains her first appearance in California P.cna
And other characters by the company.
ADMISSION ONE DOLLAR
No extra c'.iaro for reserved seats, to be had at the The- J
ater. Box sheet open Monday at 10 o clock.
r fii r ni , i
rrlliBit '.
'3 RESTAURANT FRANCAIS.
Dinner Bill of Fare,
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9.
C'ara Chowder
Fresh Crawfish Salau
SOUPS.
Mock Turtle, Bouillon.
FISH.
Boiled Flounder, Egg Sauce.
EOILED.
Mutton, Caper Sauce. Tongue, Picklo Sauce
nam, unampajrne sauce.
ROAST.S.
Beef. Goose, stuffed with Oysters. Veal Stuffed.
Mutton or Lamb. Goose, Cranberry Sauce. Fork.
ENTREES.
Stewed Rabbit, with Mushrooms, Phj's Feet Breaded.
Stuffed Pig, Stewed Lamb and Pease, Oyster Pate'.
VEGETABLES.
Tomatoes. Sweet Potatoes. Parsnips,
fotatoes. Lima Beans.
PCDDING-Plum.
PIES.
Mine:. Custard. Apple.
FRANCOIS A. MANNONY, Proprietor.
Oar Stock Conststlii Pit of
GRCCERItS,
PROVISIONS,
BUTTER,
FLOUR,
GRAIN,
GROUND FEFD,
CLOTHING,
LQU3RS,
Fxtoxa.t Msdiclncs,
O LS.
PAINTS,
CROCKERY,
STOVES.
TIXWABE,
HARDWARE
BOOTS AND SHOES,
A0ENT.S FOR
.Etna,
Fireman's fanil,
North British anil Mrrosntlle,
iScoltisli Commercial,
London & Llr.rpool & Uli!-,
Royal.
Im-ritilt No'iliKin and Quven
Commrrcial Union.
Special attention given Woodyard risk".
auiOtf J. U. kLKKEY, Solicitor.
AT
OLCOVICH BROS.
A
nkw A.n f n i;s nsrrp. v op
CLOAK
Has just been received, which arc sold at such low r.itci
that they are voiiijf very quick. Therefore ladles i.J :u
well to call soon.
ie8 nor ie-
AreTsold
Etc.
.Etc.
.Etc
FRISBIE'S RESTAURANT.
11 VINO ROtlGHT THE
'above named Restaurant of Mrs.
iM. A. Frisbie, the undersigned so-
licits the patronage of the public.
Tho Rritanrant has been Rn vnteil and
Karni-JifHl aaw tnrontf nuut, and no
pains will b spared t make it in
all respects a First Class
Restaurant.
Also, Two Nicely Furnished Rooms to let, $10, with board,
per mourn.
The Table will be provided with all the Dtllcacies of
the Season.
OPEN ALL HOURS. DAY AND NIGHT.
FRANCOIS A. MANNONY, Proprietor.
Carson, Sptember 30, 1ST'. lm"1
From our Ion? experience in the business, and knowing
and appreciating the wants of our customers and the in
habitants of this section of the couutry generally, we feet
We Can Guarantee Satisfaction
To all who may'favor us with their patronac.
Give ns a call and examine oar stack and
prices before purchasing elsewhere.
GILLSON
Carson, Oetober 6, 1S77.
& BARBER.
At !50: cents on :tho Doltar, to
CIoso out a Lirgo Consignment.
This is a rare chance for tho ladies to buy 'Cloaks and
Furs for less than their real value.
All are invited to call at
OL.COYICII JSIiOS.
Carson City, October 17, 1877.
$12.50 Twill! 8B Teeth! 12.50
OVER 100 f UTS " TflOXK JIKtrnHI,
and perfect fittimr Teeth made in the last yiarat
$12 50 per set, and not an unsatisfactory Job yet.
I can assure the public that the same kind t uo-k end
the same kind of material is used that I jjot iio p.r w.t for
a few years ao. '
None but the very best of material is used, and mtiro
satisfaction jruarauued or no pay aked.
BROKEN PLATES NEATLY MEHBED.
EXTRACTING $1.
Over Twenty Years' Practice In California and No
Call and seo.
Offica opposite ilCrton Uouse, Carson street, Carson Cit
HOT17 C. EU.UN"i3, I'cutUt

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